Map Thread XXII

It started with a dream.

A moderate one, really - a measure to just elimimate the most intolerable and internationally-embarassing consequences of Dixie race politics. Enforcement of lynching bans, if not a true guarantee of equal rights under the law. Requiring businesses over a certain size to have a separate counter for nonwhite customers, rather than turning them away on sight. Guaranteeing public education to every black child, even if it might not be as good as that provided to whites.

This was the Civil Protection Act, pushed forward by the Readjuster Yarborough administration after the landslide victory of 1963, brought on by race riots and economic slump under Democratic governance. Liberals saw it as a necessary reform to stave off the rise of black revolution - rumored to be funded by the Yankee goliath. Conservatives saw it as the first step towards racial equality and integration - and doom to the Southern way of life.

By Election Day 1966, the Democrats thought they had won the political battle. Despite being on their political last legs, they had filibustered and obstructed the Act every step of the way, all the while warning of catastrophe if it were to pass. They expected to retake the Senate, at least, and put the Act in its grave. Instead, by the smallest of margins, the Readjusters held on to their majority - all but guaranteeing the Act would be passed in the coming months.

How involved Democratic officeholders were in what followed is still a historical controversy, and will likely forever remain so, as any evidence there might have been burned in the 1971 Siege of Montgomery. In any case, on December 4, during a routine meeting with military leadership in the White House, President Yarborough and much of his cabinet was arrested. At the same time, military units across the country were seizing state capitals and asking local leaders - often literally at gunpoint - to acclaim the new regime or be removed themselves. Some, like Georgia's Maddox, were all too happy to do so. Others, like Alabama's Wallace, had to be physically removed from the door of his office by soldiers.

The coup became civil war in Louisiana, where Senate majority leader Long had coincidentally made a last-minute flight home to make Christmas arrangements. Tipped off about the coup by a friend on the staff of one of the putschists, Long rushed to the State House, and together with Governor McKeithen, called up the Louisiana National Guard, which assembled just in time to block the progress of a column of Marines advancing from New Orleans. While this map was being produced in the depths of the Pentagon in Washington, the two sides exchanged fire near the sleepy town of Duplessis, setting the fire which would soon consume the Confederacy whole.

Meanwhile, the United States - long invested in undermining the status quo in the Confederacy - was deciding how to respond. For decades, American policy was covert arming of black partisan groups, trained and armed in secret camps in the Upper South and infiltrated across the border in motorboats. An armed conflict within white society hadn't been thought a serious possibility, and now that it was happening, Washington rushed to exploit the situation. After pondering a peacekeeping occupation of the Mississippi, it ultimately decided to approve plans for an armed rising combined with an invasion of a U.S.-trained black liberation army launched by way of Mexico. The plan would succeed beyond all expectations - but with consequences no one had foreseen...


See also (in a slightly retconned timeline):

People's Republic of New Africa, 1978
Martin Partition Plan, 1963
My questions are perhaps a little confused given the two chronologically subsequent maps are slightly retconned in some manner, but: Did the Martin Partition fail and the entire land area end up being ceded to Black Nationalists? And under the Martin Plan, were the White areas to be annexed to the United States?
 
Look Away Dixieland!



What happened to the Upper South? It seem obvious it been taken back by the North, but when, and how?


I find it ironic Wallace seems to be against the coup, and had to be arrested.

What's going on in Texas and Florida?

My questions are perhaps a little confused given the two chronologically subsequent maps are slightly retconned in some manner, but: Did the Martin Partition fail and the entire land area end up being ceded to Black Nationalists? And under the Martin Plan, were the White areas to be annexed to the United States?
Apologies - I foresaw these questions would come up when I changed those details and wrote a second comment on the original Reddit thread but forgot to xpost here. Here it is:

Why is the CSA only the Deep South?
This was the CSA before the call-up of troops in the ACW which led directly to Virginian secession. ITTL, a Seward presidency leads to a more passive approach to the secession crisis, leading to a peaceful separation where the Upper South remains in the Union.

What happened to Texas and Florida between this map and the two linked above?
In the previous maps, the explanation was Florida was retaken by the Spanish after a failed attempt to take Cuba, and Texas seceded with U.S. support shortly after - i.e. both lost in the late 19th/early 20th century. In this one, I retconned it a touch such that Texas and Florida are moderate 'holdouts' which remain in the control of loyalist forces when the U.S. backed African rising occurs, leaving them outside the successor state of New Africa. Open to comments re: which 'canon' makes more sense/is more interesting.
 
Apologies - I foresaw these questions would come up when I changed those details and wrote a second comment on the original Reddit thread but forgot to xpost here. Here it is:

Why is the CSA only the Deep South?
This was the CSA before the call-up of troops in the ACW which led directly to Virginian secession. ITTL, a Seward presidency leads to a more passive approach to the secession crisis, leading to a peaceful separation where the Upper South remains in the Union.

What happened to Texas and Florida between this map and the two linked above?
In the previous maps, the explanation was Florida was retaken by the Spanish after a failed attempt to take Cuba, and Texas seceded with U.S. support shortly after - i.e. both lost in the late 19th/early 20th century. In this one, I retconned it a touch such that Texas and Florida are moderate 'holdouts' which remain in the control of loyalist forces when the U.S. backed African rising occurs, leaving them outside the successor state of New Africa. Open to comments re: which 'canon' makes more sense/is more interesting.

If the CSA Military and hardliners coup the government over such the waterdown and weak Civil Protection Act I can't image how they ended slavery itself without a very violent reaction, or even how the USA with the Upper South ended it there.

I think the latter makes more sense. Can't see Spain taking Florida.
 
SC general box should be dark gray, yes? @neonhydr
nQXuW63.jpg
SC box should be gray like Bama's, yeah?
 
nQXuW63.jpg


It started with a dream.

A moderate one, really - a measure to just elimimate the most intolerable and internationally-embarassing consequences of Dixie race politics. Enforcement of lynching bans, if not a true guarantee of equal rights under the law. Requiring businesses over a certain size to have a separate counter for nonwhite customers, rather than turning them away on sight. Guaranteeing public education to every black child, even if it might not be as good as that provided to whites.

This was the Civil Protection Act, pushed forward by the Readjuster Yarborough administration after the landslide victory of 1963, brought on by race riots and economic slump under Democratic governance. Liberals saw it as a necessary reform to stave off the rise of black revolution - rumored to be funded by the Yankee goliath. Conservatives saw it as the first step towards racial equality and integration - and doom to the Southern way of life.

By Election Day 1966, the Democrats thought they had won the political battle. Despite being on their political last legs, they had filibustered and obstructed the Act every step of the way, all the while warning of catastrophe if it were to pass. They expected to retake the Senate, at least, and put the Act in its grave. Instead, by the smallest of margins, the Readjusters held on to their majority - all but guaranteeing the Act would be passed in the coming months.

How involved Democratic officeholders were in what followed is still a historical controversy, and will likely forever remain so, as any evidence there might have been burned in the 1971 Siege of Montgomery. In any case, on December 4, during a routine meeting with military leadership in the White House, President Yarborough and much of his cabinet was arrested. At the same time, military units across the country were seizing state capitals and asking local leaders - often literally at gunpoint - to acclaim the new regime or be removed themselves. Some, like Georgia's Maddox, were all too happy to do so. Others, like Alabama's Wallace, had to be physically removed from the door of his office by soldiers.

The coup became civil war in Louisiana, where Senate majority leader Long had coincidentally made a last-minute flight home to make Christmas arrangements. Tipped off about the coup by a friend on the staff of one of the putschists, Long rushed to the State House, and together with Governor McKeithen, called up the Louisiana National Guard, which assembled just in time to block the progress of a column of Marines advancing from New Orleans. While this map was being produced in the depths of the Pentagon in Washington, the two sides exchanged fire near the sleepy town of Duplessis, setting the fire which would soon consume the Confederacy whole.

Meanwhile, the United States - long invested in undermining the status quo in the Confederacy - was deciding how to respond. For decades, American policy was covert arming of black partisan groups, trained and armed in secret camps in the Upper South and infiltrated across the border in motorboats. An armed conflict within white society hadn't been thought a serious possibility, and now that it was happening, Washington rushed to exploit the situation. After pondering a peacekeeping occupation of the Mississippi, it ultimately decided to approve plans for an armed rising combined with an invasion of a U.S.-trained black liberation army launched by way of Mexico. The plan would succeed beyond all expectations - but with consequences no one had foreseen...


See also (in a slightly retconned timeline):

People's Republic of New Africa, 1978
Martin Partition Plan, 1963
This is fantastic.
 
I've been playing a lot of TNO recently and felt inspired to make a super-shattered America similar to Russia.View attachment 873618
Instead of having the generically named "Outer Quebec Republic" you could go with the Republic of Madawaska.
It was a historical unrecognized state in around that area. Existing for a few months before the Maine/New Brunswick border was fully formalized.

The French speakers there aren't actually Québécois anyway, they are Acadian or Brayon.
 
Instead of having the generically named "Outer Quebec Republic" you could go with the Republic of Madawaska.
It was a historical unrecognized state in around that area. Existing for a few months before the Maine/New Brunswick border was fully formalized.

The French speakers there aren't actually Québécois anyway, they are Acadian or Brayon.
I didn't know that, thanks!
 
What's the best free software for basic WorldA maps? Paint.net costs 15 NZD on the Microsoft app store and I ain't paying that. Gimp is an unintuitive mess. MS Paint has turned to shit.
 
What's the best free software for basic WorldA maps? Paint.net costs 15 NZD on the Microsoft app store and I ain't paying that. Gimp is an unintuitive mess. MS Paint has turned to shit.
I think you're looking at the wrong web here. Paint.net is a completely free software and they have their own website. Just search up "paint net" and it should come up.
 
That gives me a link to the Microsoft store. I did manage to find it anyway though.
There should be a "get it now (free download)" prompt at the top right corner of the page beneath the header. That's the primary download for PDN. The only main difference between the paid and free version is that the free version's updates need to be installed manually rather than automatically like the paid version
 
Top