Map Thread XXI

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This is a biogeography map we did for Atlas Altera. It is an ode to maps made by Alfred Russel Wallace and his infamous Wallace Line between Borneo and Sulawesi. This one is a map on faunal distribution patterns in the world of Altera, or zoogeography.

Altera_Biogeography_Fauna_Small.jpg
To see other and more serious maps from the project, go to AtlasAltera.com or r/atlasaltera or go to the Altera Deviantart page. You can also take a deep dive on Youtube.com/@atlasaltera

You will find that some of the hierarchical geographical levels of analysis differ from Wallace's. My schema is a balance of qualitative and quantitative territorial groupings informed by Holt et al.'s mapping of phytogenetic turnover for each birds, amphibians, and mammals, as well as Schmidt-Wallace's original provinces, which privileged mammals.
 
This is a biogeography map we did for Atlas Altera. It is an ode to maps made by Alfred Russel Wallace and his infamous Wallace Line between Borneo and Sulawesi. This one is a map on faunal distribution patterns in the world of Altera, or zoogeography.

View attachment 812758
To see other and more serious maps from the project, go to AtlasAltera.com or r/atlasaltera or go to the Altera Deviantart page. You can also take a deep dive on Youtube.com/@atlasaltera

You will find that some of the hierarchical geographical levels of analysis differ from Wallace's. My schema is a balance of qualitative and quantitative territorial groupings informed by Holt et al.'s mapping of phytogenetic turnover for each birds, amphibians, and mammals, as well as Schmidt-Wallace's original provinces, which privileged mammals.
Telamon on his way to summon one of the most banger maps of the mapmaking community:
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The Union of South Africa in January 2020

Screen Shot 2023-02-24 at 7.04.52 AM.png


South Africa, officially the Union of South Africa, is the southernmost country in Africa. It is bounded to the south by 4,367 kilometers (2,713 mi) of coastline that stretch along the South Atlantic and Indian Oceans; to the north by the neighboring countries of Angola, Barotseland, Bembaland; and to the northeast by Mozambique. It is the southernmost country on the mainland of the Old World, and the most populous country located entirely south of the equator. South Africa is a biodiversity hotspot, with unique biomes, plant and animal life. With over 180 million people, the country is the world’s 11th-most populous nation and covers an area of 3,019,139 square kilometers (1,876,005 square miles). The nation’s capital is located in Pretoria, while its largest city is Johannesburg.

The history of South Africa dates back to the colonization of the area by the Dutch Empire. Many people from different parts of the world - from Western Europe to South Asia - would settle in the Dutch Cape Colony - resulting in South Africa being nicknamed the “rainbow nation” for its large ethnic diversity. The colony came under the control of Great Britain following the Napoleonic Wars, and British influence and immigration followed. Tensions between the Anglo South Africans and Dutch Boers resulted in frequent clashes throughout the 19th century, such as the First and Second Boer Wars. South Africa would eventually become a self-governing dominion on 31 May 1910. It initially included the Cape, Transvaal, Natal, and Orange Free State, but grew to include the former South West Africa colony, Southern Rhodesia, the Bechuanaland Protectorate, Swaziland, and Basutoland.

South Africa is one of Africa’s most advanced democracies; it has never had a coup d’etat and regular elections have been held for almost a century. In its early years however, only the white minority could vote. Over a generation, the voting franchise would be gradually expanded - first to Cape Coloureds and educated Black Africans in 1950, then Asians in 1966, and finally the rest of the population in 1975. Since 1975, all ethnic and linguistic groups have held political representation in the country’s liberal democracy, which consists of a federal parliamentary constitutional monarchy in the Westminster tradition - and nine provinces. South Africa is one of the most diverse countries in the world, and over 40% of its population consists of immigrants. The country is a Commonwealth realm and is officially bilingual (English and Afrikaans) with 9 other languages being recognized.

A highly developed country, South Africa has the 19th highest nominal per capita income globally and the 24th highest ranking on the Human Development Index. The nation has the second-highest ranking on the Human Development Index in Africa, behind only Biafra. Its economy is the 11th largest in the world - and relies primarily on its abundant mineral wealth, manufacturing industry, agriculture, tech industry, space industry, and international education. South Africa ranks high in international rankings of education, economic freedom, quality of life, health, safety, civil liberties, and political rights. The country is a founding member of the League of Nations, and also has membership in the Commonwealth of Nations, OTO, the African Co-Prosperity Organization, the Sub-Saharan Economic Community, the G10, the G25, and the OECD.
 
The Union of South Africa in January 2020

View attachment 812958

South Africa, officially the Union of South Africa, is the southernmost country in Africa. It is bounded to the south by 4,367 kilometers (2,713 mi) of coastline that stretch along the South Atlantic and Indian Oceans; to the north by the neighboring countries of Angola, Barotseland, Bembaland; and to the northeast by Mozambique. It is the southernmost country on the mainland of the Old World, and the most populous country located entirely south of the equator. South Africa is a biodiversity hotspot, with unique biomes, plant and animal life. With over 180 million people, the country is the world’s 11th-most populous nation and covers an area of 3,019,139 square kilometers (1,876,005 square miles). The nation’s capital is located in Pretoria, while its largest city is Johannesburg.

The history of South Africa dates back to the colonization of the area by the Dutch Empire. Many people from different parts of the world - from Western Europe to South Asia - would settle in the Dutch Cape Colony - resulting in South Africa being nicknamed the “rainbow nation” for its large ethnic diversity. The colony came under the control of Great Britain following the Napoleonic Wars, and British influence and immigration followed. Tensions between the Anglo South Africans and Dutch Boers resulted in frequent clashes throughout the 19th century, such as the First and Second Boer Wars. South Africa would eventually become a self-governing dominion on 31 May 1910. It initially included the Cape, Transvaal, Natal, and Orange Free State, but grew to include the former South West Africa colony, Southern Rhodesia, the Bechuanaland Protectorate, Swaziland, and Basutoland.

South Africa is one of Africa’s most advanced democracies; it has never had a coup d’etat and regular elections have been held for almost a century. In its early years however, only the white minority could vote. Over a generation, the voting franchise would be gradually expanded - first to Cape Coloureds and educated Black Africans in 1950, then Asians in 1966, and finally the rest of the population in 1975. Since 1975, all ethnic and linguistic groups have held political representation in the country’s liberal democracy, which consists of a federal parliamentary constitutional monarchy in the Westminster tradition - and nine provinces. South Africa is one of the most diverse countries in the world, and over 40% of its population consists of immigrants. The country is a Commonwealth realm and is officially bilingual (English and Afrikaans) with 9 other languages being recognized.

A highly developed country, South Africa has the 19th highest nominal per capita income globally and the 24th highest ranking on the Human Development Index. The nation has the second-highest ranking on the Human Development Index in Africa, behind only Biafra. Its economy is the 11th largest in the world - and relies primarily on its abundant mineral wealth, manufacturing industry, agriculture, tech industry, space industry, and international education. South Africa ranks high in international rankings of education, economic freedom, quality of life, health, safety, civil liberties, and political rights. The country is a founding member of the League of Nations, and also has membership in the Commonwealth of Nations, OTO, the African Co-Prosperity Organization, the Sub-Saharan Economic Community, the G10, the G25, and the OECD.
The concept of a unified Southern Africa makes me really love life , especially when it's the wholesome ending.
 
The Union of South Africa in January 2020

View attachment 812958

South Africa, officially the Union of South Africa, is the southernmost country in Africa. It is bounded to the south by 4,367 kilometers (2,713 mi) of coastline that stretch along the South Atlantic and Indian Oceans; to the north by the neighboring countries of Angola, Barotseland, Bembaland; and to the northeast by Mozambique. It is the southernmost country on the mainland of the Old World, and the most populous country located entirely south of the equator. South Africa is a biodiversity hotspot, with unique biomes, plant and animal life. With over 180 million people, the country is the world’s 11th-most populous nation and covers an area of 3,019,139 square kilometers (1,876,005 square miles). The nation’s capital is located in Pretoria, while its largest city is Johannesburg.

The history of South Africa dates back to the colonization of the area by the Dutch Empire. Many people from different parts of the world - from Western Europe to South Asia - would settle in the Dutch Cape Colony - resulting in South Africa being nicknamed the “rainbow nation” for its large ethnic diversity. The colony came under the control of Great Britain following the Napoleonic Wars, and British influence and immigration followed. Tensions between the Anglo South Africans and Dutch Boers resulted in frequent clashes throughout the 19th century, such as the First and Second Boer Wars. South Africa would eventually become a self-governing dominion on 31 May 1910. It initially included the Cape, Transvaal, Natal, and Orange Free State, but grew to include the former South West Africa colony, Southern Rhodesia, the Bechuanaland Protectorate, Swaziland, and Basutoland.

South Africa is one of Africa’s most advanced democracies; it has never had a coup d’etat and regular elections have been held for almost a century. In its early years however, only the white minority could vote. Over a generation, the voting franchise would be gradually expanded - first to Cape Coloureds and educated Black Africans in 1950, then Asians in 1966, and finally the rest of the population in 1975. Since 1975, all ethnic and linguistic groups have held political representation in the country’s liberal democracy, which consists of a federal parliamentary constitutional monarchy in the Westminster tradition - and nine provinces. South Africa is one of the most diverse countries in the world, and over 40% of its population consists of immigrants. The country is a Commonwealth realm and is officially bilingual (English and Afrikaans) with 9 other languages being recognized.

A highly developed country, South Africa has the 19th highest nominal per capita income globally and the 24th highest ranking on the Human Development Index. The nation has the second-highest ranking on the Human Development Index in Africa, behind only Biafra. Its economy is the 11th largest in the world - and relies primarily on its abundant mineral wealth, manufacturing industry, agriculture, tech industry, space industry, and international education. South Africa ranks high in international rankings of education, economic freedom, quality of life, health, safety, civil liberties, and political rights. The country is a founding member of the League of Nations, and also has membership in the Commonwealth of Nations, OTO, the African Co-Prosperity Organization, the Sub-Saharan Economic Community, the G10, the G25, and the OECD.
I see Lesotho and eSwatini are part of South Africa ITTL. Were the monarchies of those countries deposed as they united with South Africa, or do they retain some kind of authority as subnational monarchs? If so, is it closer to the ceremonial authority of traditional rulers in places like Uganada and Nigeria or do they hold some political power like the German Empire/British Raj/Malaysia?
 
The Union of South Africa in January 2020

View attachment 812958

South Africa, officially the Union of South Africa, is the southernmost country in Africa. It is bounded to the south by 4,367 kilometers (2,713 mi) of coastline that stretch along the South Atlantic and Indian Oceans; to the north by the neighboring countries of Angola, Barotseland, Bembaland; and to the northeast by Mozambique. It is the southernmost country on the mainland of the Old World, and the most populous country located entirely south of the equator. South Africa is a biodiversity hotspot, with unique biomes, plant and animal life. With over 180 million people, the country is the world’s 11th-most populous nation and covers an area of 3,019,139 square kilometers (1,876,005 square miles). The nation’s capital is located in Pretoria, while its largest city is Johannesburg.

The history of South Africa dates back to the colonization of the area by the Dutch Empire. Many people from different parts of the world - from Western Europe to South Asia - would settle in the Dutch Cape Colony - resulting in South Africa being nicknamed the “rainbow nation” for its large ethnic diversity. The colony came under the control of Great Britain following the Napoleonic Wars, and British influence and immigration followed. Tensions between the Anglo South Africans and Dutch Boers resulted in frequent clashes throughout the 19th century, such as the First and Second Boer Wars. South Africa would eventually become a self-governing dominion on 31 May 1910. It initially included the Cape, Transvaal, Natal, and Orange Free State, but grew to include the former South West Africa colony, Southern Rhodesia, the Bechuanaland Protectorate, Swaziland, and Basutoland.

South Africa is one of Africa’s most advanced democracies; it has never had a coup d’etat and regular elections have been held for almost a century. In its early years however, only the white minority could vote. Over a generation, the voting franchise would be gradually expanded - first to Cape Coloureds and educated Black Africans in 1950, then Asians in 1966, and finally the rest of the population in 1975. Since 1975, all ethnic and linguistic groups have held political representation in the country’s liberal democracy, which consists of a federal parliamentary constitutional monarchy in the Westminster tradition - and nine provinces. South Africa is one of the most diverse countries in the world, and over 40% of its population consists of immigrants. The country is a Commonwealth realm and is officially bilingual (English and Afrikaans) with 9 other languages being recognized.

A highly developed country, South Africa has the 19th highest nominal per capita income globally and the 24th highest ranking on the Human Development Index. The nation has the second-highest ranking on the Human Development Index in Africa, behind only Biafra. Its economy is the 11th largest in the world - and relies primarily on its abundant mineral wealth, manufacturing industry, agriculture, tech industry, space industry, and international education. South Africa ranks high in international rankings of education, economic freedom, quality of life, health, safety, civil liberties, and political rights. The country is a founding member of the League of Nations, and also has membership in the Commonwealth of Nations, OTO, the African Co-Prosperity Organization, the Sub-Saharan Economic Community, the G10, the G25, and the OECD.
This must be part of a larger timeline, as I am seeing that OTL Zambia is split up.
 
I see Lesotho and eSwatini are part of South Africa ITTL. Were the monarchies of those countries deposed as they united with South Africa, or do they retain some kind of authority as subnational monarchs? If so, is it closer to the ceremonial authority of traditional rulers in places like Uganada and Nigeria or do they hold some political power like the German Empire/British Raj/Malaysia?
Lesotho and Eswanti have subnational monarchs and enjoy a large degree of autonomy from Pretoria.

This must be part of a larger timeline, as I am seeing that OTL Zambia is split up.
That’s because it is part of a larger timeline. It’s for a timeline project called A Pale Rainbow - a world in which society and technology are far more egalitarian and advanced as a consequence of the Taiping Rebellion being co-opted into modernizing China and Hannibal Hamlin becoming President after Lincoln instead of Andrew Johnson, causing Reconstruction to succeed in terms of making African-Americans equal to Whites.

The borders are like this because in response to a stronger China, Britain forms the Imperial Federation in 1896 - which later evolves into the Franco-British Union during WW2 and finally the Entente Commonwealth Organization in 1946. The Entente fights HARD to keep their colonies, but due to a combination of American and Soviet support of independence guerrillas - the Organization dissolves by 1986. Britain and France go their separate ways - Britain and the rest of the Commonwealth form a successor organization known as the Commonwealth of Nations, while France joins the European Federation (stronger version of the EU with common investment market and military force).

Edit: South Africa isn’t the only developed country in Africa ITTL either. Other African countries that are a lot wealthier include Angola, Mozambique, Zambia (split), Malawi (called Nyasaland ITTL), Ethiopia, Katanga (southern DRC), Biafra (southern Nigeria), and Ghana (Ashantiman ITTL)
 
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Are there calls for creating more native subnational monarchies in the country then, e.g. the Zulu Kingdom?
On the contrary, South Africa is drifting further and further towards republicanism. After the death of Queen Elizabeth II in ITTL February 2023 - South Africa becomes one of the first countries in the Commonwealth to hold a referendum on the status of the monarchy. Most (55.4%) vote to abolish the monarchy and rename the country to the Republic of Azania (Azania was one of the names to be choosen for South Africa when it abandoned Apartheid IOTL).
 
Napoleonic Peace.png


A small little thing, but here's the state of Europe in 1888 in a world where Tsar Paul I of Russia survives his assassination attempt after a warning from his son. He punishes the would-be assassins, who reveal to him that the British ambassador in Saint Petersburg, Charles Whitworth, had helped organize the affair, even offering financial assistance. Paul executes the plotters, arrests Whitworth, and immediately writes to First Consul Bonaparte, pledging military alliance. More cynical than before, and more wary of the nobility, he makes a deliberate effort to both ruffle less feathers at home and punish Britain abroad.

The Bipartite Alliance eventually strong-arms Prussia and Sweden to join the war on their side, as well, and a temporary peace with Britain is quickly achieved after the shocking Bipartite naval victory in Skagerrak Strait. After peace is achieved, France joins Russia in what became known as Napoleon's "Turkish Adventure" to shore up the new alliance. The war was a success, and soon found the combined French and Russian forces carving up the Balkans between them, seizing Tsargrad for Paul's sense of sentiment, and finally negotiating joint French rule of Egypt with the local Mamelukes. In 1809, Napoleon (long since Emperor of the French) is married to Ekaterina Pavlovna. In 1815, France and Russia turn their attention to Austria, sparking the War of the Final Coalition. France and Russia met the forces of Austria proper, the Holy Roman Empire, Prussia, and Britain— and won, handily. Napoleon (and, apprehensively, Paul) seized the reigns of fate and used their crushing victory to reshape the face of Europe forever. The Holy Roman Empire was abolished (its territory divided into several mid-sized states to buffer between the Allies), Poland was formally annexed by Russia, France wrested control of Naples, and the Habsburgs lost Galicia and Bohemia.

But, in 1819, Paul was betrayed. His own son, Alexander, organized a conspiracy to abduct the Tsar and force him to abdicate, fed up with what he saw as subservience to the French peacocks. The plot succeeded effortlessly, and Tsar Alexander I was crowned that same month. And, with a letter and a word, the alliance with France was broken. However, Tsar Alexander I was too caught up fixing his father's domestic mistakes and trying to avoid being couped himself to go to war, much to the frustration of London, Vienna, and Berlin. Indeed, no war came— instead, an uneasy stalemate emerged between the two countries for decades to come.

Despite the new lurking Russian opposition, French victory after French victory had snowballed into French dominance over the continent. By 1850, Hungary had broken free of their Austrian overlords, the Ottoman Empire had all but collapsed (with the former allies more than happy competing to see who could mangle its corpse the fastest), and Irish social-republicans were in open revolt against Great Britain (who had recently lost control of the Indian subcontinent as well). "Social-republicanism" also spread through Germany and Italy like a wildfire— not only unifying Italy and the German Federation (mostly consisting of former Saxony, Bavaria, and surrounding states), but also gradually giving the newly-coronated Napoleon II the grounds he needed for his own conquest: in Rome, Sicily, and the Rhine. France and Russia began assembling allies and puppets. France led a loose coalition of allies (the United States, Ottoman Turkey, and Denmark) to supplement its informal control of Italy and Spain, and its growing colonial empire. Russia, meanwhile, formalized a new Grand Alliance, commonly referred to in history as "the Reaction": Great Britain, Prussia, and Hungary.

By 1888, the dust has settled from the miniature explosion of social-republicanism, and the continent now knows lasting peace for the very first time since the Revolution.

But who can say how long it will last?

(Thinking this may be an under-explored timeline idea— a lot of focus in "Napoleonic victory" scenarios is given to the actions of Napoleon, but I think there's a lot more room for "total victory" by changing the stuff that was outside of his control).
 
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Habsburg Greater Germany 1848.png

A quick map that I put together while I procrastinate university papers and wait for my new laptop to finish my other maps. Europe and surrounding regions in 1950, 100 years after the reunification of Germany and Italy under the Habsburg dynasty. Please ask for lore so I can make up lore and try to expand the universe a bit. Might make this into a full map much later.
 
@Aichi72 what's up with the weird shaped menagerie of countries in the Empty Quarter on the Arabian Peninsula?
Those are tribes present in that region that are nominally part of the Emirate of Nejd but are functionally independent as it is incredibly hard to enforce central government authority there.
 
View attachment 813340
A quick map that I put together while I procrastinate university papers and wait for my new laptop to finish my other maps. Europe and surrounding regions in 1950, 100 years after the reunification of Germany and Italy under the Habsburg dynasty. Please ask for lore so I can make up lore and try to expand the universe a bit. Might make this into a full map much later.
What happened in Iraq/Kuwait?
 
What happened in Iraq/Kuwait?
The Great Oriental War, in which Greece, Russia, and Iran teamed up to take down the Ottomans. The war resulted in a victory for the Greece-Russia-Ottoman alliance. The Ottomans were kicked out of Europe and Russia annexed eastern Anatolia. The biggest winners were the Iranians and Egyptians as the Ottomans pulled troops to defend Constantinople. Egypt declared full independence with British backing and Iran annexed parts of Kurdistan(?) and established an Iraqi client state in Mesopotamia. The British took the opportunity to expand their Kuwaiti vassal.
 
The Great Oriental War, in which Greece, Russia, and Iran teamed up to take down the Ottomans. The war resulted in a victory for the Greece-Russia-Ottoman alliance. The Ottomans were kicked out of Europe and Russia annexed eastern Anatolia. The biggest winners were the Iranians and Egyptians as the Ottomans pulled troops to defend Constantinople. Egypt declared full independence with British backing and Iran annexed parts of Kurdistan(?) and established an Iraqi client state in Mesopotamia. The British took the opportunity to expand their Kuwaiti vassal.
Why the hiccup in the Greek/Bulgarian border?
 
What happened in Africa?
Africa is basically OTL with only some slight differences such as Guinea and Eritrea, as well as some more territories that are under local tribal control. In 1950, the Africa seen on this map stands at the beginning stages of decolonisation as the European powers prepare to elevate the locals, particularly local elites, into colonial governance as part of a multi-stage decolonisation process that is intended to end sometime around the turn of the millenium. The only exceptions are the Portuguese and Spanish colonies, as well as some French colonies such as Algeria, Senegal, and Djibouti which have been fully integrated into the European metropole.
 
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