Map Thread XXI

While South Sudan as part of some East African union makes sense, I must say, that it looks aesthetically ugly on the map. Wonder if some western/southwestern part of Ethiopia could became part of EA fed. too? (I mean theoretically, in scenario it doesn´t make much sense, probably)
The Nuers in Ethiopia are fine as part of Ethiopia, and have no desire to join their compatriots in East Africa.
 
[50+ Likes] United Kingdom of the Spains, by CastilloVerde
United Kingdom of the Spains:
deycpua-d15f2e2e-9b83-497f-bd36-2d6cd6c361ae.png

The idea is that the Hispanic kingdoms gradually form into a united kingdom of Spain similar in some ways to OTL Great Britain, just with more steps.

The POD is that Enrique I of Castile manages to avoid his random early death in 1217 preventing Leon and Castile from being united in 1230 under Fernando III. The two kingdoms avoid a early union preserving their separate institutions and customs for much longer.

As the centuries pass, Leon and Castile and the other hispanic kingdoms continue onward with the Reconquista, engage in conflicts and royal marriages among each other, and embark on voyages of exploration until a lucky monarch finds himself inheriting the kingdoms of Portugal, Leon, Castile and Aragon like Charles V of OTL with his inheritance.

Eventually, Granada, which survived as an independent islamic kingdom for much longer due to division among the christian states, is brought into the Spanish crown after a grand invasion which completed the Reconquista - the event that marks the founding of the united kingdom.

Granada remains a separate 'Crown' from Castile to prevent Castile from becoming too powerful at the expense of the other crowns. However, Castile is the dominant kingdom and the castilian language functions as the language of government. The national capital is also the castilian capital of Toledo. Each of the other constituent realms, however, keep many of their old laws, institutions and languages separate from that of Castile and have their own devolved parliaments.

Questions and comments are always appreciated!
 
Map of Existing Sassanids.png

The Sassanid Empire survives the Arab Caliphate,and instead the Byzantines are wiped out by the Arab Caliphate instead of the Sassanids.Despite many struggles, the Sassanids have survived for 1000 years in 1225 AD.​
 
United Kingdom of the Spains:
deycpua-d15f2e2e-9b83-497f-bd36-2d6cd6c361ae.png

The idea is that the Hispanic kingdoms gradually form into a united kingdom of Spain similar in some ways to OTL Great Britain, just with more steps.

The POD is that Enrique I of Castile manages to avoid his random early death in 1217 preventing Leon and Castile from being united in 1230 under Fernando III. The two kingdoms avoid a early union preserving their separate institutions and customs for much longer.

As the centuries pass, Leon and Castile and the other hispanic kingdoms continue onward with the Reconquista, engage in conflicts and royal marriages among each other, and embark on voyages of exploration until a lucky monarch finds himself inheriting the kingdoms of Portugal, Leon, Castile and Aragon like Charles V of OTL with his inheritance.

Eventually, Granada, which survived as an independent islamic kingdom for much longer due to division among the christian states, is brought into the Spanish crown after a grand invasion which completed the Reconquista - the event that marks the founding of the united kingdom.

Granada remains a separate 'Crown' from Castile to prevent Castile from becoming too powerful at the expense of the other crowns. However, Castile is the dominant kingdom and the castilian language functions as the language of government. The national capital is also the castilian capital of Toledo. Each of the other constituent realms, however, keep many of their old laws, institutions and languages separate from that of Castile and have their own devolved parliaments.

Questions and comments are always appreciated!
How did you create the topography shadowing? Was it done on a raster program?
 
United Kingdom of the Spains:
deycpua-d15f2e2e-9b83-497f-bd36-2d6cd6c361ae.png

The idea is that the Hispanic kingdoms gradually form into a united kingdom of Spain similar in some ways to OTL Great Britain, just with more steps.

The POD is that Enrique I of Castile manages to avoid his random early death in 1217 preventing Leon and Castile from being united in 1230 under Fernando III. The two kingdoms avoid a early union preserving their separate institutions and customs for much longer.

As the centuries pass, Leon and Castile and the other hispanic kingdoms continue onward with the Reconquista, engage in conflicts and royal marriages among each other, and embark on voyages of exploration until a lucky monarch finds himself inheriting the kingdoms of Portugal, Leon, Castile and Aragon like Charles V of OTL with his inheritance.

Eventually, Granada, which survived as an independent islamic kingdom for much longer due to division among the christian states, is brought into the Spanish crown after a grand invasion which completed the Reconquista - the event that marks the founding of the united kingdom.

Granada remains a separate 'Crown' from Castile to prevent Castile from becoming too powerful at the expense of the other crowns. However, Castile is the dominant kingdom and the castilian language functions as the language of government. The national capital is also the castilian capital of Toledo. Each of the other constituent realms, however, keep many of their old laws, institutions and languages separate from that of Castile and have their own devolved parliaments.

Questions and comments are always appreciated!
Welcome back!
You've come back with a nice gift. 🙂
 
Sigh. This is the second time in under a week where I've been ninja'd on maps: first I had plans for a world map for Victories of the Heart, but bang! Up goes a fiiiine map by the original author. Then I started on a "Vikings stay in North America" scenario from the Beyond Time collection, and someone comes up with another "Vinland" scenario - in a largely "Munroist" style better than mine is ever going to be. [1]

Very nice map and scenario, and the lore is presented in an entertaining fashion. Re Bolgaria/Romei: did the Bulgarians take over a crumbling Byzantine empire and then reconquer its former territories in Anatolia, but failed to pull off a Spanish-type religious/cultural reconquista?

Quibble: I gotta say, I don't really believe this bit. Egypt for a variety of reasons can't play the role of Empire of North America to France's Britain. (What do you mean by "imbued with the Egyptian culture?" Does he and/or his son convert to Islam?)

This is where it all begins. King Henri III was so imbued with the Egyptian culture that after the defeat of the British and the beginning of the reconstruction of France, he often visited here on summer holidays. Thirty years later, his son Emanuel declared Egypt a part of France. After 20 years, the capital of France was officially moved to Alexandria. Here's a story. France has become a backyard in the state of France with its capital in Egypt!

[1] Aside from people doing basic paint type maps better than I do, there's just so much quality map-making now, based on fancy imaging programs, that I often feel, to quote the late great SJ Perelman, that I have been asleep for the last twenty years and everyone is jeering at my unkempt hair and rusty fowling piece.
I can assure you, Vinland is here only to soften the Columbus exchange and to make the South Africa-like situation. So I can't wait for your map about Vinland.

Yes, the Bulgarians considered themselves the successors of Eastern Rome. They pushed into Anatolia, but just like OTL Ottomans in the Balkan case, they could not carry out a complete Christianization of the region.

and yes, you don't have to make fancy maps, we love your art anyway.
 
Just a quick idea..."what if parts of both Anatolic and Tocharian speakers move to the British Isles and France and what if their languages survive until today?"


The Urhic-Vroetshemic language group is a part of the Anatolic branch of the Indo-European language family and the last remaining part of the Anatolic branch.
Proto-Urhic used to be part of an own Indo-European language family (most closely related to Tocharian) at the time, they - along with speakers of Proto-Vroetshemic - started to move to western Europe in 2500 BC. Due to close contact with speakers of Proto-Vroetshemic (and other Anatolics) the Proto-Urhic language recieved a fairly strong Anatolization, but on the other hand, the Proto-Vroetshemic language received some remarkable influences of Proto-Urhic.
Also after both the Vroetshemic peoples and the Urhic peoples settled down in their final lands (today's Vroetshemian Isles, Urhia and Misilia) both groups kept in close contact.
The Roman Empire could never conquer all of ancient Urhia and the islands of Vroetshemia were a long way away from the Romans.
The southern Urhic tribes could more or less keep their languages the entire time of being part of the Imperium Romanum, but their languages, especially the ones at the Mediterranean coast, got very strong Romance influence.
In 1083-1087, the Vroetshemic king Erdürjuw invaded the Urhian lands and unified these under his crown. The personal union lasted 235 years. The Urhian language(s) received a heavy Vroetshemization, resulting that Urhian ended being an (the last) Tocharian language. Since then, the Urhian language was part of the Anatolic branch of the Indo-European language family.
After the pestilence in Misilia at the end of the 13th century, romance-speakers settled there and the Misilian language got more and more romanized.

Today both Urhian and Vroetshemian are as mutually intelligible as are Czech and Slovene. Misilian is now a Romance language but still with strong Urhic elements.


The map below shows the linguistic situation in 1083 at the eve of Erdürjuw's landing.
iBhzA1n.png
 
I was recently shocked to learn that about 90% of the population of the (current, OTL) UAE are non-citizens without permanent residence rights. To me, this sounds like a recipe to build up to disastrous instability the next time a spark comes along. For the MOTF, here is an idea of a good-but-not-best-case-scenario of how this could be resolved in the nearish future. Of course, it also includes lots of red hatches, because there's nothing more fun to map than international conflict!
The New UAE: neither united, nor Arab, nor an emirate
M1JwGWY.jpg

The second Arab Spring of the early 2030s, set off by the violent Saudi succession crisis, finally shattered the perceived stability of the Gulf monarchies. In the United Arab Emirates, calls for representation and civil freedoms were compounded by the country's massive non-citizen population - nearly 95% as of 2032. When violent crackdowns on street protests served only to further enrage the migrant worker population, the Emirs were forced to compromise or flee the country.

The result of the 2036 compromise between the opposition and the old order was the most liberal government on the peninsula. Full civil and political rights were extended to all residents, and foreigners living in the country at the time of the revolution were offered citizenship - millions of whom accepted.

This radical shift in domestic power naturally created a geopolitical rift between the UAE, which reoriented towards Iran and India, and neighbors and former allies of Arabia and Oman, both of which managed to weather the Spring with their autocracies mostly intact. Almost immediately, Riyadh made an attempt to seize the oil wealth of southern Abu Dhabi, leading to a short but brutal conflict characterized by heavy use of drone swarm attacks. At the same time, Oman gave its backing to the Emir of Fujairah, creating a breakaway client state.
 
United Kingdom of the Spains:
deycpua-d15f2e2e-9b83-497f-bd36-2d6cd6c361ae.png

The idea is that the Hispanic kingdoms gradually form into a united kingdom of Spain similar in some ways to OTL Great Britain, just with more steps.

The POD is that Enrique I of Castile manages to avoid his random early death in 1217 preventing Leon and Castile from being united in 1230 under Fernando III. The two kingdoms avoid a early union preserving their separate institutions and customs for much longer.

As the centuries pass, Leon and Castile and the other hispanic kingdoms continue onward with the Reconquista, engage in conflicts and royal marriages among each other, and embark on voyages of exploration until a lucky monarch finds himself inheriting the kingdoms of Portugal, Leon, Castile and Aragon like Charles V of OTL with his inheritance.

Eventually, Granada, which survived as an independent islamic kingdom for much longer due to division among the christian states, is brought into the Spanish crown after a grand invasion which completed the Reconquista - the event that marks the founding of the united kingdom.

Granada remains a separate 'Crown' from Castile to prevent Castile from becoming too powerful at the expense of the other crowns. However, Castile is the dominant kingdom and the castilian language functions as the language of government. The national capital is also the castilian capital of Toledo. Each of the other constituent realms, however, keep many of their old laws, institutions and languages separate from that of Castile and have their own devolved parliaments.

Questions and comments are always appreciated!
Very cool map, is Grenada still Muslim or has it been mostly converted by the modern day?

Also, is Mallorca independent?
 
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