Map Thread XXI

Continuing my Time Zone ISOT series, UTC-04:00 (Atlantic Time) and UTC-03:30 (Newfoundland Time).

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UTC-04:00
Regions transported: Greenland (Thule Air Base), Canada (most of Labrador, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia), Bermuda, Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands, Anguilla, Caribbean Netherlands, Antigua & Barbuda, St Kitts & Nevis, Guadeloupe, Dominica, Martinique, St Lucia, Barbados, St Vincent & the Grenadines, Grenada, ABC Islands, Trinidad & Tobago, Venezuela, Guyana, Brazil (Roraima, most of Amazonas, Rondônia, Mato Grosso, Mato Grosso do Sul), Bolivia, Paraguay, Chile

Thule Air Base's name, taken from the legendary Greek island beyond the northern edge of the known world, suddenly became even more appropriate as the rest of Greenland was wiped clean of any traces human civilisation, leaving Thule's nearest neighbours over a thousand miles away in the northern tip of Labrador. While the USAF and USSF personnel stationed at Thule were concentrated in the base itself, Labrador's civilian population was spread out across the region in Happy Valley-Goose Bay, Labrador City and many smaller mining and fishing communities. The region's lack of land connections to the Canadian maritime provinces and separate cultural and history made efforts to integrate Labrador into the new Maritime Union slow and difficult, and, although a territorial government was briefly functional, ultimately fruitless. An independent Labrador republic formed instead, with the Inuit Nunatsiavut Autonomous Area being joined by Côte-Nord, the francophone remnant of Quebec, and later Labrador established a territory of its own over Newfoundland island. The Maritime Union itself had been formed by the governments of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island shortly after the Event thanks to the three provinces' cultural and infrastructural links, with the founders been later joined by the provinces of Gaspé, St Lawrence, Penobscot and Erie, plus the overseas territory of Bermuda.

Bermuda's decision to put itself under Maritime sovereignty was partly motivated by the security concerns which ripped through its southern neighbours in the Caribbean following the Venezuelan invasion of Guyana in the first decade on from the Event. The government in Caracas, buoyed by the almost complete disappearance of the United States (who's afraid of a bunch of spacemen in Greenland and the Puerto Ricans will support a fellow Latin nation) and the growing dependence of the Caribbean region on the Lake Maracaibo oil reserves, decided to finally press their longstanding claim to the Essequibo region. While the Venezuela's troops met more resistance from the Guyanese defenders than they had anticipated, the invasion was successfully executed, with Georgetown being forced to concede to Venezuelan demands. The vast majority of the annexed area's pre-war population fled eastwards along the coast, while some sought refuge in the Caribbean islands to the north, or even left the Americas altogether, settling in west Africa where they founded the state of New Guyana on the Gulf of Guinea. Abroad, condemnation of Venezuela's invasion was near universal, with only Bolivia, Aruba and Curaçao remaining neutral. A desire to present a united front and to increase defence co-ordination in the region led to the signing of the Treaty of San Juan and the formation of the Caribbean Sea Defence Organisation (CASDO), with the Maritime Union and Amazonia as partner nations.

Amazonia, the largest of the nations to emerge from Brazil, had also had a turbulent beginning. The authorities in Manaus had seen themselves as the rightful successors to Brasília and themselves as not just the government of Amazonas but the whole of the Federative Republic of Brazil. This claim was unsurprisingly rejected in the other state capitals, who on the whole ignored any "federal" directions issuing from Manaus. Unhappy at this insubordination, Manaus tried to send troops into Porto Velho and Cuiabá, prompting a series of protests, defections and ultimately proclamations of Rondonian and Matogrossan independence. At the same time, protests among the native groups of Amazonas broke out and Venezuela completed its annexation of Essequibo. Fearing a complete breakdown of order and leaving the country open to opportunist Venezuelan aggression, the regime in Manaus was overthrown and a new regime installed. The country was renamed the Federative Republic of Amazonia, the independence of Rondônia, Mato Grosso and Mato Grosso do Sul was recognised and greater autonomy granted to indigenous communities in the north and west. A second series of reforms reorganised the eastern areas into new states and territories were established in frontier regions with a view to future statehood, while the independent native republic of Maranhão was established in the upper Amazon.

Free from Manaus' rule, Mato Grosso and its southern neighbour agreed the creation of a United Republic of Mato Grosso, with the north and south having equal status and Cuiabá and Campo Grande declared joint capitals. Following the expansion of Matogrossan settlement along the Paraná River, a third eastern division was added and the country became known as the breadbasket of South America. Although various minor disputes over agricultural tariffs and water rights on the Paraná erupted between Mato Grosso and Paraguay, the southern part of the continent avoided the wars that had dogged the north. Bolivia peacefully regained a coastline and freed its navy from endless patrols of Lake Titicaca to sail the open Pacific while Chile, as well as playing chief negotiator in the spats between Paraguay and Mato Grosso, consolidated its control over the Southern Cone with the extension of the resettled Magallanes Territory to the Atlantic coast and beyond, and the establishment of an outpost on the San Matias Gulf, linked to the Chilean mainland by the nominally independent Mapuche state of Pwelmapu.


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UTC-03:30
Regions transported: Canada (Newfoundland and part of Labrador)

In a flash, over seven decades of confederation with Canada were over as the people of Newfoundland now found themselves separated not just from the rest of the country but from the rest of humanity, save for a few settlements across the Strait of Belle Isle in the far south of Labrador. Newfoundland's sudden independence was accompanied with a collapse of its petroleum and mining industries as the island's domestic demand alone proved insufficient and many of Labrador's mines were replaced with virgin tundra, leading to the re-emergence of the traditional fishing industry as a key employer. As the fishing fleet ranged further and further from the island's shores, small outposts began springing up along the southern shores of the Gulf of St Lawrence and New England, providing both rest for the crews and maintenance for their boats, but also a new market for their produce. With time, while some outposts ultimately became abandoned, others grew into new towns, their surrounding woodlands being cleared for agriculture, very little of which could be practiced on Newfoundland island itself.

New communities had also appeared in Labrador, however while the growth of the fishing and agricultural sectors had been largely organic, a restart of the region's mining industry required substantial investment, which St John's proved to be slow in providing. Frustrated Labradorians therefore turned to their own efforts and, through much perseverance, new mines were opened up. The struggle against the Newfie government however proved formative to a sense of Labradorian nationalism and ultimately resulted in full separation. With the majority of Newfoundland's remaining population now living off island and many having never even set foot there, Labrador many not be the last territory to decide to try life away from St John's control.
 
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Didn't realize what felt so off about the base map... until I noticed Antarctica mysterious' disappearance. Did all the ice melt? (But then, sea levels should be rather higher... and lots of coastlines should be good 'n gone)

I suppose it's not the most eccentric thing in the map, what with the Australo-Indonesian super union, Cuba finally owning Florida... only to sell it to the US, of all people? (Unless it's a Spanish-American war type sale thingie, with heavy coercion involved), and of course... is that a Moroccan re-reconquista? (that reddish(?) color, which is usually reserved for Morocco, make it seem so, anyway). Well, they're some five hundred years late, but better late than never I suppose.
Seems to be re-Reconquista from the British European Union.
 
Crossposting from MotF 253:
The Arctic Belongs to Norway!
(or Quisling “succeeds”)
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7 June 1941:

Attack or be attacked.

On some level, Stalin knew he would have to make this decision since the United Kingdom and Nazi Germany signed an Armistice last July. Despite German insistence that troop deployments in Poland were simply in support of “anti-partisan operations” – nobody was fooled about Hitler’s true intentions. Three million soldiers were not needed to hold down a minor Polish insurgency. And there was no “Polish insurgency” in Romania and Finland, but German soldiers had been deployed there too.

Still, Stalin clung to the hope that invasion could be avoided – or at the very least pushed back another year. Long enough that the Soviet Union could more readily resist the German hordes. Hitler’s Germany still relied heavily on Soviet raw good imports and the ceasefire established between the British and Germans could break at any moment. However, when German Panzers began moving into positions near the Soviet frontier at the start of June, Stalin knew that Germany intended to attack, and attack soon. He had to make up his mind.

There had been fierce debate among the Soviet High Command about how to respond to a German invasion. Some advocated for a pre-emptive spoiling attack, which would seek disrupt the anticipated German offensive before it could be launched. Others advocated for letting the Germans attack before throwing the invaders back with a counteroffensive. Every conceivable scenario was war gamed, then war gamed again. Each course carried considerable risks. It fell upon Stalin to decide.

The usually resolute Man of Steel was wracked with indecision. He knew his own survival, the survival of the Soviet state, and perhaps even the survival of the Communist ideology depended on his decision. Stalin spent days vacillating between options, but by the 7th of June it was clear a decision had to be made immediately. Soviet reconnaissance planes had spotted German infantry formations moving to jumping off points along the German-Soviet border. The Soviet intelligence sources were reporting that the invasion would be launched in less than a month, and possibly within the fortnight. The Rasputitsa was over, and the spring thaw no longer supplied the great rivers of Eastern Europe. Red Army echelons in the Western Military districts were still deployed in an awkward intermediate disposition in anticipation of Stalin’s order to either move to an offensive or defensive posture. If the Germans attacked the Soviet Military in its current state, it would be a complete disaster. There was no more time for indecision.

As Stalin prepared to sign orders, he thought back to the speech he gave on 5 May 1941 to graduating military cadets. “A good defense signifies the need to attack. Attack is the best form of defense.” Those words replayed in Stalin’s mind. With a heavy sigh, Stalin approved a variant of the spoiling attack plan drafted by Marshal Zhukov. To defend itself, the Soviet Union would launch a preemptive attack on 21 June.

Within minutes, the code word “STAR” was transmitted to Soviet formations in the Western Military Districts. Unbeknownst to the Red Army, German codebreakers were also listening in. A few hours later, at LVI Panzer Corps HQ in East Prussia, German General Erich von Manstein read the latest dispatch from OKW with a visible smirk, before turning to an attendant: “The Bolsheviks have no idea what they are walking into”

-----

Mere hours after invading Norway on 9 April 1940, Nazi Germany attempted to install a pliant, Pro-German, civilian government in Norway by supporting Vidkun Quisling’s (leader of the Nasjonal Samling party) coup attempt. Early that day, Quisling had announced on the radio that he had assumed the position of prime minister because the Norwegian government had the fled country. In reality, the Norwegian government had relocated inland to avoid capture by the invading German forces. Nevertheless, in an attempt to legalize the coup, German Führer Adolph Hitler demanded that Norwegian King Haakon VII appoint Quisling as Prime Minister. For his part, King Haakon refused – stating he would rather abdicate than appoint a government headed by Quisling. Support for Quisling’s coup collapsed, and Germany soon set aside Quisling and tried to build up an alternative government known as “the Administrative Council” in a bid to gain greater popular acceptance for a collaborationist government. Less than a month after invading Norway, Germany would successfully invade and occupy France and the Low Countries – as well as capturing the bulk of the United Kingdom’s expeditionary force. Now the masters of continental Europe, Germany sought to cement their control over the continent.

Norway’s government-in-exile, obliged to leave the United Kingdom under the terms of the latter’s armistice agreement with Germany, initially attempted to negotiate with Hitler to reach some sort of agreement that would allow for the return of Norway’s pre-war civilian government. The Norwegians agreed to a number of concessions demanded by Germany (such as coopting most of the “Administrative Council”) but refused to give Nasjonal Samling an outsized role in government to the degree that Hitler wanted and also refused the perpetual stationing of German soldiers in certain strategic points in the country. Hitler desired to invade the Soviet Union the following year and did not want to risk Norway joining the war against Germany (or being invaded by the United Kingdom, who Hitler did not completely trust to maintain the armistice agreement). As such, he refused to give ground to the Norwegian position, and negotiations collapsed.

Now concluding that King Haakon would never be won over, Hitler decided to drop all pretenses of working out a negotiated settlement with Norway’s government-in-exile. After a meeting with Quisling in on 16 August in Berlin, Hitler provided his full backing to Quisling and Nasjonal Samling. The German civilian administration in Norway was gradually phased out, and Quisling’s government was formally inaugurated on 30 January 1941. Soon after, a treaty was duly concluded between Nazi Germany and the newly installed Nasjonal Samling government of Norway. German military presence in Norway was legalized and Norway joined the Anti-Comintern pact. On the domestic front, Quisling quickly moved to “suspend” the Monarchy, outlaw political opposition, reconstitute the Norwegian military (under firm NS control), and inaugurate an anti-pluralist and pro-eugenicist regime.

With a weak base of domestic support (Nasjonal Samling only had slightly more than 40,000 members by 30 April 1941), Quisling made every effort to ingratiate himself with his German benefactors. This included promises to support Germany in any military confrontation with the Soviet Union. As the eve of war neared, German military planners began directly coordinating with Quisling’s government. The Nasjonal Samling agreed to make forces available to assist Operation Arctic Fox and Operation Silver Fox (the planned attack on Murmansk and the Kola peninsula) and promised to eventually raise a further three divisions to assist the Germans elsewhere against the Soviets.

On 21 June 1941, the Soviet Union launched “Operation Star” – a spoiling attack on German positions designed to disrupt the planned German offensive. Operation Star might have produced dividends for the Soviets had Germans not successfully anticipated the strike (due to breaking Soviet codes and with intelligence assistance from the Baltic states resistance). Germany received the Soviet attack on prepared positions – and after tying down Soviet forces with their infantry, unleashed Panzer spearheads to encircle the attacking Soviet forces in vast cauldrons. Soviet casualties were immense – with entire armies being destroyed or captured – the spoiling attack completely failed (for his part in drafting the plan, Soviet Marshall Zhukov was shot). To make matters worse for the Soviet Union, Stalin suffered a debilitating stroke less than a week into the war, which threw the upper echelons of leadership into complete chaos.

Even with these setbacks, the Soviet Union fought harder than anyone in Germany anticipated. It would take nearly seven years for German soldiers to reach the Ural Mountains – where they would unilaterally halt at the end of extremely overstretched supply lines. The war proved much more costly for Quisling’s Norway than anticipated. Norway would lose nearly 12,000 men in the conflict, with about twice as many wounded. Many of these casualties were rather needlessly self-inflicted due to Norwegian actions in the early stages of the war. The Quisling regime coveted many Soviet territories as part of its conception of the “Norgesveldet.” These included the Kola Peninsula, northern Arkhangelsk Oblast (referred to by the NS regime as “Bjarmeland”) and Novaya Zemlya, as well as the disputed territories of Svalbard and Franz Josef Land (the latter of which Quisling had renamed as “Fridtjof Nansen Land” in honor of the Norwegian polar explorer who had been a close friend of Quisling). Under the direction of the NS regime, the Norwegian military made many foolish and costly attacks in attempt to be the ones to secure possession of these territories, fearful that their allies would refuse to grant Norway its territorial claims unless they secured the land for themselves. In the end, Führer Göring (who succeeded Hitler in 1947 after the latter succumbed to complications from Parkinson’s) ratified the Norwegian conquests, but only after Quisling agreed to give the Germans substantial economic rights in Kola (mainly related to mining Nickel)

As the Cold War between Nazi Germany and the United States began to heat up, Norway became an invaluable part of Germany’s strategic posture. With Norwegian acquiescence, Germany built many military installations in Norway – from the great submarine pen “Nordstern” in the Trondheim fjord to the Luftwaffe Base “Nordlicht” in Fridtjof Nansen Land – Germany’s northernmost military outpost. Norwegian military bases would prove invaluable for Germany during the Swedish Crisis of 1956. Führer Göring, who had personal sympathies for Sweden, had allowed the country to maintain a greater degree of independence than most other continental European nations. This had allowed Sweden to be a relatively safe haven for Jews and other persons deemed “undesirables” by the Nazi Government. Upon Göring’s passing in 1953, the new Führer, Baldur von Schirach, began to increasingly intrude on Sweden’s domestic politics. This meddling came to a head in at the start of 1956. Nazi Germany put immense pressure on Sweden to expatriate a group of 193 refugees who had fled Nazi persecution. The Swedish government reluctantly acceded to German demands but was met with popular backlash. The Swedish government was toppled, and fresh elections in March inaugurated a government less willing to cooperate with Germany.

Führer von Schirach viewed this development as unacceptable, and immediately ordered the Wehrmacht to invade Sweden and force a regime change. While raising tensions between the superpowers to unprecedented heights (and almost leading to the outbreak of nuclear war), this task was accomplished in less than a week: Sweden came under German military occupation and the Nazis began the search for a pliable puppet to head Sweden’s new government. Seeking to make an example out of Sweden in order to discourage other European countries from breaking free of Berlin’s grasp, Von Schirach offered Swedish territory to the neighboring Scandinavian countries. Denmark declined Germany’s offer of Scania. While Finland seriously considered annexing the Torne valley, they too declined to annex parts of Sweden (as the Finnish populace was broadly sympathetic to the Swedes). In contrast, Norway’s ruling Nasjonal Samling party eagerly accepted the German proposal as a means to realize their desire of “Greater Norway.” On 29 July 1956, Norway formally annexed Jemtland, Herjedalen, and Båhuslen. Norway would see no further territorial expansion after this point, though the Nasjonal Samling government continues to make claims on Greenland (which became a US protectorate after the German occupation of Denmark in 1940).

Today, Norway under Nasjonal Samling is the leading state in Scandinavia, overshadowing its former masters of Denmark and Sweden. Oil and gas reserves (both in the North Sea and Arctic) have made Norway a key energy exporter to the German Reich, as well as providing Norway with the highest GDP per capita on the European continent. Furthermore, Norway’s strategic position, already important, is expected to increase in significance as climate change opens up new Arctic shipping lanes. While still a nation of fewer than seven million, Norway enjoys exceptionally strong diplomatic relations with their “racial kinfolk” in the German Reich – which views Norway as the “model ally”.
 
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The main prize of Germany's victory over the Franco-Russian Alliance in the Great War was indisputably the creation of the Central African Colony, more well known by its German name of "Mittelafrika", a vast colonial holding rivalring that of France in area and surpassing it in population. The colony was born out of the merging of two of Germany's already existing colonies, Ostafrika (East Africa) and Kamerun, and the land taken from France and Belgium at the end of the Great War, those being the entirety of the Belgian Congo (thus ending Belgium's short experiment at a colonial empire that had started with Leopold I's ambitions) and most of French Equatorial Africa sans the colony of Chad, which remained under French control and would later be merged with French West Africa.
Private enterprises were welcomed by the new colonial administration, and a lot of the already operating businesses in the Congo were allowed to stay, paying a "small" fee to the Mittelafrika Administration, obviously. The prosperity of the colonialists, however, came at the expense of that of the colonized. The overextension of the colony and the failures at the complete integration of the preexisting French and Belgian administrative structures made Mittelafrika very susceptible to organized resistance, something that was fueled by the afromentioned suffering of the native populations. Soon, Central Africa would see itself involved in a constant state of rebellion at war, with the Second Great War finally being the nail in the coffin for Germany's ambitions in Africa.​


Another update to Discordiale. If you don't know what Discordiale is, the general idea of the TL is a world where Britain and France never ally in 1905, and therefore Britain sits WW1 out, which ends in a narrow victory of the Germans in their initial Schlieffen Offensive, and consequently the victory of the Central Powers in the war. I suggest checking out the previous three maps I've made for the scenario:
[Anglo-Turkish War]
[Danube War]
[China in 1928]
Currently my objective is to get the world up-to-date to 1928, but I have yet to iron out details in Eastern Europe, Russia and Central Asia/India. Questions and comments are welcome, and I'll do my best to answer them accordingly!
 
Strong Bourbon France?
Super successful Napoleonic [1] France, followed by a successful changeover to a democratic Republican regime (There are Bourbons, but they're in the kingdom of Canada).

[1] And yes, the POD is clearly too early for Napoleon to survive the butterfly onslaught: it's not meant to be a high-plausibility scenario in any case.
 
Super successful Napoleonic [1] France, followed by a successful changeover to a democratic Republican regime (There are Bourbons, but they're in the kingdom of Canada).

[1] And yes, the POD is clearly too early for Napoleon to survive the butterfly onslaught: it's not meant to be a high-plausibility scenario in any case.
Does not!Napoleon crown himself Emperor or does he stick to ruling through a "republican dictatorship" with his rule legitimized through sham elections or something like that?
 
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Does not!Napoleon crown himself Emperor or does he stick to ruling through a "republican dictatorship" with his rule legitimized through sham elections or something like that?
Not sure, although the overthrow (and guillotining) of *Napoleon II in 1836 is retrospectively considered the restoration of democratic rule.
 
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Here's a little AH map. The POD is that the newly independent countries of the Americas unite in 1837 to form the United Republics of Columbia. Map is of 1860.
The United Republics of Colombia is composed of 14 republics - North America, Mexico, Central America, Cuba and Puerto Rico, Haiti, Venezuela, New Granada, Ecuador, Peru, Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay, Chile and Argentina - plus the state of Panama which is controlled directly by the Union government. Each republic is in turn divided into states, territories (darker) and autonomous territories (lighter).
 
unknown.png

The main prize of Germany's victory over the Franco-Russian Alliance in the Great War was indisputably the creation of the Central African Colony, more well known by its German name of "Mittelafrika", a vast colonial holding rivalring that of France in area and surpassing it in population. The colony was born out of the merging of two of Germany's already existing colonies, Ostafrika (East Africa) and Kamerun, and the land taken from France and Belgium at the end of the Great War, those being the entirety of the Belgian Congo (thus ending Belgium's short experiment at a colonial empire that had started with Leopold I's ambitions) and most of French Equatorial Africa sans the colony of Chad, which remained under French control and would later be merged with French West Africa.
Private enterprises were welcomed by the new colonial administration, and a lot of the already operating businesses in the Congo were allowed to stay, paying a "small" fee to the Mittelafrika Administration, obviously. The prosperity of the colonialists, however, came at the expense of that of the colonized. The overextension of the colony and the failures at the complete integration of the preexisting French and Belgian administrative structures made Mittelafrika very susceptible to organized resistance, something that was fueled by the afromentioned suffering of the native populations. Soon, Central Africa would see itself involved in a constant state of rebellion at war, with the Second Great War finally being the nail in the coffin for Germany's ambitions in Africa.​


Another update to Discordiale. If you don't know what Discordiale is, the general idea of the TL is a world where Britain and France never ally in 1905, and therefore Britain sits WW1 out, which ends in a narrow victory of the Germans in their initial Schlieffen Offensive, and consequently the victory of the Central Powers in the war. I suggest checking out the previous three maps I've made for the scenario:
[Anglo-Turkish War]
[Danube War]
[China in 1928]
Currently my objective is to get the world up-to-date to 1928, but I have yet to iron out details in Eastern Europe, Russia and Central Asia/India. Questions and comments are welcome, and I'll do my best to answer them accordingly!
So, how are Anglo-German relations in 1928? Given the Second Reich's really overbearing diplomacy (thanks to the 'ole Kaiser), I imagine sitting out the first world war!equivalent musta required more deterioriation on part of Anglo-French relations (fairly plausible given amount of colonial overlap) than any Anglo-German reconciliation. So I imagine the British aren't satisfied with Germany's position on the continent - well, how much did they extract from the French and the Belgians, anyway, besides colonies, on the mainland?
 
So, how are Anglo-German relations in 1928? Given the Second Reich's really overbearing diplomacy (thanks to the 'ole Kaiser), I imagine sitting out the first world war!equivalent musta required more deterioriation on part of Anglo-French relations (fairly plausible given amount of colonial overlap) than any Anglo-German reconciliation. So I imagine the British aren't satisfied with Germany's position on the continent - well, how much did they extract from the French and the Belgians, anyway, besides colonies, on the mainland?
Britain's current policy is that of containment of Germany, really, they've expanded their influence in the Middle East at the expense of Germany's ally, the Ottomans.
Regarding Europe, I'm not 100% sure on the exact terms yet, but the general gist is probably Germany taking Belgian Luxembourg, those infamous coal mines in the border with France, and getting Belgium under their economic and geopolitical sphere, while demanding the demilitarization of the French border. They did expand in Eastern Europe, to an extent similar to that of Brest-Litovsk of OTL, but that doesn't concern Britain as much as Western Europe does.
 
If you use PaintZ with Worlda, always, ALWAYS save your maps as png. You can rename it to JPG and make it a jpeg, just dont save it as one. Photo Evidence:
1650896249832.png
Saved as PNG, renamed to JPEG

1650896288996.png

Saved as JPEG

IF you use https://paintz.app/, save as PNG so you can more easily edit the map if necessary.
 
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