Map Thread XX

My second map™

This map started on a project of mine thinking about how New France could have survived (and even thrive) with a POD after 1700. It quickly became pretty dark because of the state needed to survive the Anglo threat.

darkamerica.png


So New France survives and only loses periphery territory until the 7 years war, where they lose New Orleans and southern Louisiana. There is no American Revolution and the North and South become independent in the 1830s. There's still the French revolution and the monarchy flees to Canada/New France.

This New France/Canada is a deeply catholic society, where the church has a big role in colonization, education and healthcare. Every Canadian (except some natives) are forced to serve at least 3 years in the army and will be conscripted in the event of a war. These are 2 of the 3 pillars of Canadian society, the third being the King, but more recently the Legislative Assembly, or National Assembly has been gaining power over the King. There is a large Native and Metis population in Canada, as the government and church let the natives alone as long as they officially convert (and pay some taxes of course).

The American Republic is a republic based on the Roman Republic, having consuls and a powerful senate. They also are fervently anti-Catholic, making Catholics go to Canada or Columbia. The Columbian Confederation is a religiously tolerant nation compared to Canada and America, even if they are a slave owning stratified society. Mexico meanwhile is doing better than OTL.

There are tensions in this North America, from the now 2 century old conflict between the American Republic/Northern British America and Canada/New France, tension between Columbia, and well, everyone, from Mexico who hate them because of the Texas War and the Conquest of Cuba and America who hates them for being slavers . South America is as unstable as ever, with the Peruvian Kingdom, B I G P A R A G U A Y, Grenada, Argentina and others waiting for each opportunity to weaken their neighbors. The American Continent is a powder keg waiting to explode.

The population of Canada is 21 millions, that of the American Republic 32 millions, that of Columbia 28 millions, including the colonies and that of Mexico 14 millions. The 6 largest economy in the Americas are the American Republic, Columbia, Canada, Mexico, Brazil and Argentina

The flags of major powers at the bottom left can let you guess who the great powers of this world are. I'm currently working on a timeline that is going to be close to this map, so if there are positive reactions I am going to start to post it. Also do NOT try to take a closer look at the Argentinian flag , I beg you.
 
A fun albeit not entirely plausible map which I've been working on for a week or so.
I have a… soft spot? fetish? deep fascination? with scenarios that are “completely within the realm of physical possibility—both in terms of the laws of physics and the geopolitical reality of their setting before the POD—but seem really wacky, totally outlandish, and which would require a lot of things to go totally right for those involved to occur, but nevertheless did.”

I’m not German, so I need a better word to describe this type of scenario (we need more of this, is what I’m saying) which isn’t just one word as long as the description.
 
I have a… soft spot? fetish? deep fascination? with scenarios that are “completely within the realm of physical possibility—both in terms of the laws of physics and the geopolitical reality of their setting before the POD—but seem really wacky, totally outlandish, and which would require a lot of things to go totally right for those involved to occur, but nevertheless did.”

I’m not German, so I need a better word to describe this type of scenario (we need more of this, is what I’m saying) which isn’t just one word as long as the description.
Aha a fellow Red Flood enjoyer I see 🤔
 
"We don't call it a butter burger because we put butter in the patty or fry it in butter or drizzle melted butter over it; we call it a butter burger because we butter the toasted bun."

"Yeah, but you still put butter in the patty, fry it in butter, and then drizzle melted butter over it?"

"Sure, but that's not why we call it a butter burger."

"Okay."

"You see if you add butter to the patty, fry it in butter, and then drizzle butter over it but serve it on a unbuttered untoasted bun it's not a butter burger."



"That's a joke, son," ~ Foghorn Leghorn
 
I have a… soft spot? fetish? deep fascination? with scenarios that are “completely within the realm of physical possibility—both in terms of the laws of physics and the geopolitical reality of their setting before the POD—but seem really wacky, totally outlandish, and which would require a lot of things to go totally right for those involved to occur, but nevertheless did.”

I’m not German, so I need a better word to describe this type of scenario (we need more of this, is what I’m saying) which isn’t just one word as long as the description.
While not being German either, I do completely understand and agree with what you’re saying :D

There’s something deeply fascinating about e.g. Viking runes tones on the Caspian.
 
del3rgb-e3e4a15b-e676-4309-aaa8-2de04293718a.png


A fun albeit not entirely plausible map which I've been working on for a week or so.

Basically, the map presupposes what could have happened if Ingvar the Far-Travelled was marginally more successful, managing to carve out a shortlived Norse kingdom on the Caspian shore of Medieval Persia.

I had a lot of fun coming up with alternate Norse names for Iranian cities. The translations are very literal and absolutely not meant to be taken as an authoritative interpretation of what Ingvar's expedition might have named the following cities.

Bálvík - Baku (Fire Bay, named after the Fire Temple of Baku)
Calþenbýr - Qazvin (Caspian Town, named as the chief city close to the Caspian)
Eríksvík - Derbent (Erik's Bay, named after St. Erik)
Gnæfagarðr - Rayy (Tower City, anachronistically named after the funeral tower of Tughrul Bey)
Hreggbýr - Rasht (Rain Town, named for the wet climate of the city)
Kjóllvík - Amol (Ship's Bay, where Ingvar's fleet landed in ATL)
Magigarðr - Saveh (Magi's City, in Iranian tradition the Three Magi set out from Saveh)
Myllaborg - Abhar (Mill's Castle, named for the agricultural produce)
Saxþorp - Shahin (Sword Settlement, named for the fine blades produced there OTL)
Smiðrborg - Sari (Smith's Castle, named for the city's supposed connection to Kaveh the Blacksmith)
Veggrsalr - Gorgan (Wall Place, named after the Walls of Gorgan)


Sources:

Map 1: Traced from "Die Länder von Islâm zur Zeit der Bujiden 945-1055" in Spruner, Karl & von Menke, Theodor: Hand-Atlas für die Geschichte des Mittelalters und der neueren Zeit (Gotha, 1880) with cross-reference to "Map 14: 1040 to the end of the 11th century: The Seljuks and Qarakhanids" in Bregel, Yuri: An Historical Atlas of Central Asia (Brill, 2005) as well as various maps on wikipedia.
Map 1.1: Generated in QGis by using data from projectlinework (Moriarty Hand) and finished in Adobe Illustrator.
Map 1.2: Traced from a Swedish historical atlas whose name sadly escapes me. Runestone placements from Larsson, Mats G.:"Ingvarstågets arkeologiska bakgrund" (The archaeological background of the "Ingvar expedition") in Forvännen: Journal of Swedish Antiquarian Research (1983): 98-113

Love it, ig Could have been interesting with a permanent Rus Azerbaijan.
 
del3rgb-86aca6b3-4039-4642-b5ff-f117d30d3877.png


A fun albeit not entirely plausible map which I've been working on for a week or so.

Basically, the map presupposes what could have happened if Ingvar the Far-Travelled was marginally more successful, managing to carve out a shortlived Norse kingdom on the Caspian shore of Medieval Persia.

Excerpt from page 35 of the Palgrave Concise Historical Atlas of the Viking Age

Viking incursions into the Caspian Sea began when 500 Rus long-ships descended the Volga River in 913 AD. After plundering the unprepared coastal regions of Gilan and Mazandaran, the Rus expedition was set upon by Khazar war parties, which slaughtered the Vikings to a man. However, this did little to deter further incursions. Indeed, three decades later, another major raid was launched, which successfully captured the city of Barda’a in modern day Azerbaijan.[1] Although Barda’a was soon abandoned and put to the torch, the city’s capture proved that the Caspian region was ripe for invasion. The flood-gates of conquest were finally thrown completely open when Sviatoslav the Brave, Grand Prince of Kiev, destroyed the Khazar state in 965. With the Volga Delta in friendly hands, the Rus slowly but steadily established a base of operations on the river’s southern estuary, centred on the newly founded city of Volgagard.[2] Small-scale raids grew more frequent and larger in scope in the following decades, culminating with the famous expedition of Ingvar the Far-Travelled in 1036-1040.

The scion of a noble Swedish house related to the legendary King Olof Skötkonnung, Ingvar set out from the Lake Mälaren region with 200 ships and close to 20.000 men in early 1036. Although most historians argue that the original target of Ingvar’s expedition was the Caucasus, it is widely acknowledged that after a few years of raiding up and down the western banks of the Caspian, the riches and the chaotic state of affairs on the Iranian plateau finally convinced Ingvar to launch a concerted attempt at conquering the southern shores of the Caspian. Having secured the cities of Eriksvik (Derbent) and Bálvík (Baku), Ingvar made landfall close to Amol in 1040, which was quickly seized from its weak and inefficient Ziyarid governor and rebranded as Kjóllvík (ship’s bay). Politically speaking, the Viking Invasion occurred at an extremely fortuitous time. The dominant Ghaznavid dynasty had just suffered a crushing defeat at the hands of the invading Seljuk Turks at the Battle of Dandanaqan (near Merv), effectively shattering any chance of a coordinated Muslim counter-attack.

Allying with Zoroastrian remnants in the hills of Mazandaran and Tabarestan (evident in the Rus exonym for the region - Bálland, meaning Land of Bonfires), Ingvar’s men made stunning territorial gains over the course of the next five years. Attempts were made at ironing out some kind of Rus-Persian polity aimed at the permanent establishment of Viking settlements in Særkland (Land of the Saracens), but by then an indigenous reaction had already materialised. Tughril Beg, the leader of the Seljuks was adamantly opposed to the presence of a Christian principality within his claimed domains and soon turned the full might of the Turkoman military machine on the outnumbered Rus. Rebellions soon broke out, galvanised by the Seljuk offensive. It was in the course of fighting one of these insurrections that Ingvar fell in 1045 somewhere in Gilan. After his death, the Rus rallied around a captain named Baggi[3], who withdrew to Kjollvík. However, five years later the last Viking stronghold in Iran fell to one of Tughril’s commanders, who killed or enslaved most of the defenders. As the Gripsholm Runestone in modern-day Sweden sadly laments: “… They travelled valiantly far for gold, and in the east gave food to the eagle. They died in the south in Særkland.”[4]



[1] In OTL, this raid was unsuccessful, partly thanks to the outbreak of dysentery amongst the Vikings.
[2] An ATL city.
[3] The name of an actual ship’s captain in Ingvar’s expedition, mentioned on runestone U778
[4] From the OTL runestone

Notes:

I had a lot of fun coming up with alternate Norse names for Iranian cities. The translations are very literal and absolutely not meant to be taken as an authoritative interpretation of what Ingvar's expedition might have named the following cities.

Bálvík - Baku (Fire Bay, named after the Fire Temple of Baku)
Calþenbýr - Qazvin (Caspian Town, named as the chief city close to the Caspian)
Eríksvík - Derbent (Erik's Bay, named after St. Erik)
Gnæfagarðr - Rayy (Tower City, anachronistically named after the funeral tower of Tughrul Bey)
Hreggbýr - Rasht (Rain Town, named for the wet climate of the city)
Kjóllvík - Amol (Ship's Bay, where Ingvar's fleet landed in ATL)
Magigarðr - Saveh (Magi's City, in Iranian tradition the Three Magi set out from Saveh)
Myllaborg - Abhar (Mill's Castle, named for the agricultural produce)
Saxþorp - Shahin (Sword Settlement, named for the fine blades produced there OTL)
Smiðrborg - Sari (Smith's Castle, named for the city's supposed connection to Kaveh the Blacksmith)
Veggrsalr - Gorgan (Wall Place, named after the Walls of Gorgan)


Sources:

Map 1: Traced from "Die Länder von Islâm zur Zeit der Bujiden 945-1055" in Spruner, Karl & von Menke, Theodor: Hand-Atlas für die Geschichte des Mittelalters und der neueren Zeit (Gotha, 1880) with cross-reference to "Map 14: 1040 to the end of the 11th century: The Seljuks and Qarakhanids" in Bregel, Yuri: An Historical Atlas of Central Asia (Brill, 2005) as well as various maps on wikipedia.
Map 1.1: Generated in QGis by using data from projectlinework (Moriarty Hand) and finished in Adobe Illustrator.
Map 1.2: Traced from a Swedish historical atlas whose name sadly escapes me. Runestone placements from Larsson, Mats G.:"Ingvarstågets arkeologiska bakgrund" (The archaeological background of the "Ingvar expedition") in Forvännen: Journal of Swedish Antiquarian Research (1983): 98-113
Fantastic map as always. Absolutely love your style and implementation here
 
CentralAmerica(smll).png


Quick Lore: The Federal Republic of Central America in this timeline prevented its civil war and survived. The Country's economy would grow with its trading fruits such as Bananas and such. Having been more stable, it prevented the Banana Republic dictatorship that several central American nations suffer in our world. There have been discussions ever since Panama and Belize independence over whether or not they should join the Federation or not.
 
I first posted this map here around 4 years ago, and just dug it up in an old folder while looking for another file.

alternatesouthasia2-jpg.332757

It shows South Asia in 2015, alternate history version. The British came and conquered as OTL, but not as much. Bengal came under direct British control, while most of Northern India and what is now Pakistan was princely states under British influence, but no direct control. The Mughals remained as figureheads.

Mysore, Hyderabad and the Marathas were all slightly richer and better organized and were able to stay independent, though they had to kowtow to British interests a lot (except for Mysore, a French ally).

What is now Islamistan, the Republic of the Punjab and the Republic of Free India were technically under the British controlled Mughals, but when the British grew weak there was a revolution and after a short civil war, the three modern republics emerged (around 1930-40ish). Bengal remained under British control and became independent in the 1960s, but retained the British monarch as their sovereign. Ceylon also became independent around the same time, but chose to become a republic and change their name to Sri Lanka.

What do you guys think?

Cheers,
Ganesha
 
Top