I remember some blokes who served with the Australian Army in Vietnam saying that after Canungra, ( Jungle Training Centre), Vietnam was easy!
 
I find it amusing that Bourne wasn't actually a big man or an old man, he was actually a young chap, and its thanks to Zulu that we've got the impression of this towering figure of a man. Kind of like how George C Scott's portrayal of Patton has shaped how we think he was, when he didn't sound anything like him and had a rather high pitched voice.

 
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Fatboy Coxy

Monthly Donor
Aber posted about page 158 ths

Found this
http://ww2talk.com/index.php?threads/tank-numbers-in-india.96451/
Between October 1941 and November 1942 a total of 245 Valentine infantry tanks arrived in India in the WS Convoy series. The first shipment of 35 Valentines arrived in India with Convoy WS.11 on 22nd October 1941.The tanks were used to begin equipping/training the Royal Armoured Corps regiments of 50th Indian Army Tank Brigade. These were infantry battalions that had arrived in the same convoy and converted to R.A.C. regiments:
I was wondering when Indian armoured units formed and dug a little...

And I can add quite a bit to that now, see
 

Fatboy Coxy

Monthly Donor
I find it amusing that Bourne wasn't actually a big man or an old man, he was actually a young chap, and its thanks to Zulu that we've got the impression of this towering figure of a man. Kind of like how George C Scott's portrayal of Patton has shaped how we think he was, when he didn't sound anything like him and had a rather high pitched voice.

Zulu, loved that film!
 
Currently reading a biography of Admiral Hart CiC Asiatic Fleet interesting, He had some very interesting ideas on cruiser tactics, Also 1932-36 Super of Naval Academy, redid ciricilum Classes of 1934-46 graduated on his program Also he sat on the General board that brought us the South Dakota, Iowa, Montana BBs, Baltimore, Cleveland, Juneau, Cruisers, Fletcher Destroyers, Gato Class Subs, and of course the Essex class Carriers.
 
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Zulu, loved that film!
The Australian Army had it's own copy of Zulu! Which it used for morale purposes. As a projectionist I had to show it, over and over to new recruits, I showed it over thirty times and could recount the dialogue and the errors in the film. It is still one of my favourite movies. I used to quip that it trained us to fight a black uprising by forming square and firing in volleys.
 
The Australian Army had it's own copy of Zulu! Which it used for morale purposes. As a projectionist I had to show it, over and over to new recruits, I showed it over thirty times and could recount the dialogue and the errors in the film. It is still one of my favourite movies. I used to quip that it trained us to fight a black uprising by forming square and firing in volleys.
Remember it well. Instructed on several ARES Recruit courses in '80's. On one, we actually had a recruit who was Zulu!
 

Fatboy Coxy

Monthly Donor
I feel somewhat sorry for Stanley Baker, it was his film, and he had a great part in it, but was totally upstaged by Michael Caine in his first major role. One was a great actor, but the other, a great star!
 
MWI 41110816 Layton and Hart

Fatboy Coxy

Monthly Donor
1941, Saturday 08 November;

The small launch puttered across the anchorage, with Vice Admiral Geoffrey Layton RN, on board. It came alongside the yacht, USS Isabel, sometimes flagship of the US Asiatic Fleet, and tonight’s venue for dinner. Already abord was Admiral Hart, expecting his guest, but neither’s entourage would be present, this being a private meal. Hart welcomed him aboard, before ushering his guest to his day room. A lovely polished oak table was already laid out, but dinner wasn’t due until 7pm, a few drinks to be had first, in the two comfortable arm chairs, along with a relaxed conversation. This wasn’t the first time these two had met, and they had quickly become friends, despite the sometimes-awkward politics exhibited between the two navies.

Layton was on the return leg from a visit to Hong Kong, stopping at Manila to refuel the big BOAC Short Empire S23 flying Boat, Cassiopeia. While out there he had met with Major General Maltby, the commander of Hong Kong’s garrison, as well as the recently arrived Governor, Sir Mark Wood. If they had been in any doubt over Hong Kong’s vulnerability if war broke out before, his visit had cured that, there being little the Royal Navy could do to support them. A separate meeting with the commander of Hong Kong’s meagre Royal Navy’s force, Commodore Alfred Collinson, had been more productive. Collinson was under no illusions of what might happen, and they undertook a review of what assets they had left in Hong Kong, and whether anymore could be saved, and sent back to Singapore.

On the outbreak of war, both submarines in Hong Kong, currently HMS Rainbow and HMS Regent, would revert to Singapore control, while the lone destroyer, HMS Thracian, would make the attempt to sail south, hopefully avoiding any Japanese naval blockade. The rest of the craft under Collinson’s command would fight it out there. Following the review a few more names were put forward for late evacuation, dockyard workers, and some intelligence staff. These would go along with a number selected from the Army and RAF, as well as some other individuals, prized for their particular abilities.

But here in Manila, the conversation about Hong Kong with Admiral Hart was somewhat brief, there being little to tell. Hart, on the other hand, had quite a bit of good news. Merely days ago, he had been given authorisation to withdraw the fleet’s gunboats, stationed in China. Five would be returning, but USS Wake would remain, with a skeleton crew, to act as a radio base in Shanghai, while USS Tutuila was being transferred to the Republic of China’s navy under the lend lease agreement. Furthermore, the 4th Marine Regiment, was also being withdrawn to the Philippines, the majority currently stationed at Shanghai, by the end of the month, while the few others stationed elsewhere, by early December. Hart was pleased his lobbying had been successful, and most of these wasting assets had been saved.

Relations with General MacArthur had been steadily deteriorating, surprisingly, because Hart had been a lifelong friend of both him and his brother, but since MacArthur’s appointment as Commander in Chief, Far Eastern Forces, things had become difficult, the Army doing things alone, cooperation seemingly disappearing. MacArthur had also become quite rude and offensive towards Hart, making disparaging remarks, indeed Layton had borne witness to that today, when late morning all three had met, at MacArthur’s insistence, to review current events, although this was merely an opportunity for MacArthur to laud his own achievements at the massive expansion plans of the US Army forces. Following MacArthur’s detailing the expansion plans, he had turned to Hart and said, “See Tommy, this is what you need to do, get yourself a real fleet, otherwise you’re just a small fleet, big Admiral”. Layton had been acutely embarrassed for Hart, but MacArthur seemed oblivious to the slight he had given.

But despite MacArthur’s derogatory remarks, Hart’s fleet was expanding, last month had seen the arrival of the submarine tender USS Holland, and the twelve Salmon class submarines of Sub Divisions 15 and 16, exactly the type of vessel required for operations out here. The Salmon class were new boats, providing a capability the old S class submarines didn’t have, with greater range and endurance, along with the up-to-date Mark 14 Torpedoes.

However, Layton did have something to tell, a small task force was being sent from Britain to the Far East to fly the flag, and show the Americans, as well as the Japanese, that Britain meant business regarding defending her Far Eastern possessions. Its centre piece was the new King George V class battleship, HMS Prince of Wales, the force commanded by Rear Admiral Tom Phillips. Phillips capabilities as a leader in battle were unknown, he was a desk bound admiral, but the whisper was he would replace Layton.
 
I feel somewhat sorry for Stanley Baker, it was his film, and he had a great part in it, but was totally upstaged by Michael Caine in his first major role. One was a great actor, but the other, a great star!
I feel somewhat sorry for Stanley Baker, it was his film, and he had a great part in it, but was totally upstaged by Michael Caine in his first major role. One was a great actor, but the other, a great star!
A great film - even if some of the 'Martini-Henry's' are actually SMLE's! :cool:
 
Great Chapter

Please have someone shoot MacArthur in this timeline it would probably make every officer in the Philippines happy.
Have some unscrupulous journalist publish that he has VD, syphilis. It could be the British press if you want. It does not have to be true and not a hair on his head is harmed, just his reputation.
 
Remember it well. Instructed on several ARES Recruit courses in '80's. On one, we actually had a recruit who was Zulu!
That would have been interesting. I instructed on one where there was a little Vietnamese recruit who was firing the F1 SMG on the mound and scoring 100% hits on the Figure 11 target. When he finished I asked where he had learn to shoot like that, "The war" was his reply. "ARVN?" I asked, "No, the otherside." He replied. "OK, might be an idea not to mention that to some of the other instructors, OK?" Was my reply. He was a smart little bugger. He caught on quick.
 
That would have been interesting. I instructed on one where there was a little Vietnamese recruit who was firing the F1 SMG on the mound and scoring 100% hits on the Figure 11 target. When he finished I asked where he had learn to shoot like that, "The war" was his reply. "ARVN?" I asked, "No, the otherside." He replied. "OK, might be an idea not to mention that to some of the other instructors, OK?" Was my reply. He was a smart little bugger. He caught on quick.
Indeed! Well, as we watching the film, one reel finished with the Zulus at the mealie bag barricades. As the WO2 projectionist was unloading/reloading the reels, the Wing Sar-Major was walking around talking to the recruits. Seeing the Zulu trainee, he barked, "You do remember Recruit so and so, your people lose this!"
I was a Cpl at the time. I looked at another Cpl, and we both said, "Oh shit!"
Fortunately, the trainee took it in the intent it was meant.
 

Fatboy Coxy

Monthly Donor
Great Chapter

Please have someone shoot MacArthur in this timeline it would probably make every officer in the Philippines happy.
Hi Kelgar04, thank you

At this point I have to give an apology to Douglas MacArthur, the remark about Hart being a big admiral with a small fleet was made privately between MacArthur and Hart, I believe. What I have done is fanned the fires, something that good ole boy doesn't need!
 
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