Make the American Education System more effective (1930-2000)

The US Education system is widely considered to lag behind other developed nations, and this is not a new phenomenon. Without delving into current politics, was it possible to make the American Education system not fall behind the other developed countries? The US high school system in particular is and was considered weak compared to Western Europe, Japan, etc.
 
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First of all: I am NOT an American and therefore I am certainly not an absolute expert, but the following points apply to all school systems worldwide, as a trend in their favor is emerging:
- a lot of money for the education system; this may seem banal at first, but a school without money will always be a bad school
- schools have to be financed by the federal government, not in the school districts
- no school fees
- the classes must be as small as possible; the more students a teacher has, the more ineffectively they can get promoted
- few or no tick tests, these only encourage bulimic learning and no creative thinking
- study together for a long time; the earlier the selection, the more children are left behind
 
First of all: I am NOT an American and therefore I am certainly not an absolute expert, but the following points apply to all school systems worldwide, as a trend in their favor is emerging:
- a lot of money for the education system; this may seem banal at first, but a school without money will always be a bad school
- schools have to be financed by the federal government, not in the school districts
- no school fees
- the classes must be as small as possible; the more students a teacher has, the more ineffectively they can get promoted
- few or no tick tests, these only encourage bulimic learning and no creative thinking
- study together for a long time; the earlier the selection, the more children are left behind
I am an education major agree with everything you say particularly about the tests they don’t teach you to think creatively they teach you to in the words of education theorist Pablo Freire they use the banking system of education which teaches you to deposit information mindlessly and you don’t understand the context of it.
 
The US Education system is legendarily bad, and this is not a new phenomenon. Without delving into current politics, was it possible to make the American Education system not fall behind the other developed countries? The US high school system in particular is and was considered weak compared to Western Europe, Japan, etc.
Very Easy, Centralize Education with equalize funding via taxes, that way the otl loopholes of moving to richers areas are closed https://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2014/05/religious-right-real-origins-107133/
 
The US Education system is legendarily bad, and this is not a new phenomenon. Without delving into current politics, was it possible to make the American Education system not fall behind the other developed countries? The US high school system in particular is and was considered weak compared to Western Europe, Japan, etc.
Ban IQ testing, for starters, and make education involvement part of the New Deal so that what existed in white/Northern schools could be experienced by everyone (since in those types of schools, the education was overall very good). It would be hard to get it through Southern opposition, but something would need to be done there. There is, however, one thing that local governments themselves would need to do, and that is use something other than property taxes to fund schools.
 
The US Education system is legendarily bad, . . .
I disagree very much.

Percent of 18-year-olds who graduate from high school is good. (actually an age range)

Studies in reading, math, basic civics, etc, aren’t bad.

And percent of Americans who have completed some college — which can include community college — might lead many industrialized nations.
 
Very Easy, Centralize Education with equalize funding via taxes, that way the otl loopholes of moving to richers areas are closed https://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2014/05/religious-right-real-origins-107133/
Ban IQ testing, for starters, and make education involvement part of the New Deal so that what existed in white/Northern schools could be experienced by everyone (since in those types of schools, the education was overall very good). It would be hard to get it through Southern opposition, but something would need to be done there. There is, however, one thing that local governments themselves would need to do, and that is use something other than property taxes to fund schools.
Neither is going to happen. Parents get quite annoyed when educational options are taken further away from their control. They get mad enough when states do it, imagine the furor if the feds did it.
 
Perhaps a longer-lasting educational movement in the Space Race era? (That would also extend past it?) There was a big scare about ineffective education during that time period.
 
Václav Havel wrote in “The Power of the Powerless”: “A better system will not automatically ensure a better life. In fact, the opposite is true: only by creating a better life can a better system be developed.”

I think Havel is an excellent testimony to why much of the commentary about American education falls so short of the market and doesn't accomplish anything. It is all very well to talk about a system, and systems and institutions have massive influences. But an educational system is a reflection of a society, and American society's crucial features - lack of social trust, high degree of social alienation (especially among minority groups like blacks or poor whites/other poor groups), high individualism, limited community engagement, a lack of trust in authorities and institutions, high social tensions, high degrees of inequality, and limited societal mobility - are all very bad for educational perspectives. You can see that there are groups who break the stereotype of poorer US educational performance - you have massively superior educational attainment among many immigrant groups, like the Igbo people from Nigeria, and among (eastern) Asians. They have massive focus on educational attainment, strong entrepreneurial traditions, stable community structures, etc. For these people, the American educational system works very well. The problems which plague American education are doubtless in part inspired by the system, but far more by the general society it has to cope with.

You can see this in other countries too: when I was teaching abroad in France, other teachers talked about how student scores and results have declined greatly over the past several decades. Now, teachers all over the world doubtless say similar things, but I could believe it easily enough: that French society is becoming more individualist, its trust and social cohesion is in decline, and that the traditional high standards of French lycées (there once was a day when a diploma from a French lycée was equivalent to a diploma from an American university!) have massively collapsed. An Americanization of society, accompanied by heightened marginalization of people (or at least their broader appearance in society), denigration of standards, heightening inequality, and the growing separation of society into a successful, highly educated, upper echelon and masses of abandoned lower groups. France is simply not as far along this path as the United States - as the joke went, France is like America, just always 20 years behind.

What kills attempts at successful reform is that Americans would much prefer to deal with structural discussions rather than take a look at themselves.

Take the issue of teachers. Teachers need significant prestige, influence, moral authority, to be able to effectively educate and direct children. This is a factor which I always saw noted in discussion of the Nordic countries, with their brilliant educational performance - that teachers are very valued and respected in their society. I wouldn't say that they are respected to anywhere near the same extent in the United States. The discussion about fixing this tends to turn on the issue of teacher pay - which is an important issue and I am sure that teachers could use a pay increase. But there have been studies about the correlation between teacher pay and student results, and found exactly no correlation: instead of addressing a societal issue (teachers being insufficiently respected, honored, valued), Americans just want to pay more to them. Or instead of wanting to suggest serious improvements to how Americans teach and help their kids, they simply want to fire the bad teachers - what an easy and simply solution, not requiring any cultural or societal changes on the part of American people!

I would suggest that fixing the American educational system to be like the most successful areas of the world relative to education (the Nordic countries and East Asia) is simply not possible for American society: it would require a fundamental change in American society to produce a more homogenous, education inclined, less alienated, less unequal, and with less abandoned regions like the Rust Belt or American inner cities. The education system reflects society, not society the educational system. Some nibbling around the edges is possible, but it is telling that Americans always spend some of the highest amounts on education of any developed country, for such singularly poor results: just throwing more money at the problem won't fix it.

This isn't to say that structural problems don't exist, but I think they are more present at the college level and particularly in the crafts and professional education sector.
 
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Neither is going to happen. Parents get quite annoyed when educational options are taken further away from their control. They get mad enough when states do it, imagine the furor if the feds did it.
The IQ testing ban is probably the easiest bit to do. At the time, with the explosion of stuff like the early SAT, as well as literacy tests in the South and all that, IQ tests were bound up with eugenics and racism, not to mention artificially creating additional class divisions which weren't really there. It's also noteworthy that well after the SAT's creation, its designer regretted getting involved with it in the first place. In that sense, all IQ testing basically did was, essentially, taking educational options away from the control of parents and forcing students to conform to pre-existing models.
 
The IQ testing ban is probably the easiest bit to do. At the time, with the explosion of stuff like the early SAT, as well as literacy tests in the South and all that, IQ tests were bound up with eugenics and racism, not to mention artificially creating additional class divisions which weren't really there. It's also noteworthy that well after the SAT's creation, its designer regretted getting involved with it in the first place. In that sense, all IQ testing basically did was, essentially, taking educational options away from the control of parents and forcing students to conform to pre-existing models.

Curious how you propose banning an intangible thing like a test.
 
- few or no tick tests, these only encourage bulimic learning and no creative thinking
I always loved doing multiple guess tests. If you have any understanding of the subject at all they're an easy B and if you know it's coming and read your notes or text book the night before an easy A.
 
Were white schools good?
A good rule of thumb when dealing with diverse countries is: "Is it [insert dominant race/ethnicity] ? Then it's probably better than [insert minority race/ethnicity". There are exceptions ofc but I think applies here.
 
They have massive focus on educational attainment, strong entrepreneurial traditions, stable community structures, etc. For these people, the American educational system works very well.
You get out of it, what you put into it.
If you don't want to learn, you won't.
And by 'you' I include the Parents.
If they don't care, why would their kids?

Now I do believe in equal funding, where all tax revenue collected for education at the State level is distributed equally between all individual school districts, for both Public and Private schools being funded.

Does this give an edge to Private Schools? Yes.

I also believe that zero percent of the collected tax monies should go towards competitive Sports programs, like Football.
If a local community wants Stadiums and Teams, they can raise taxes for that separately-- and pay the kids for participating.
 
More money isn't the problem. The Nebraska public school districts spend on average per child over $12,000 per year (teaching only 9 months a year). I spent $9,800 for my oldest child per year to attend a private Catholic high school. My youngest refused to attend that same Catholic high school and instead attended the local public high school.

My eldest child graduated with a much better analytical understanding of the world and more independent yet had same grades as youngest

#1: Get rid of public school unions
#2: Stop funding high school athletics and spend all that money on classroom teaching
#3: Minimize non-classroom teaching administration. Many schools in our area have up to 8 deans (2 for each grade) yet they and their staff support don't teach
#4: Make it easier to kick disruptive students out of school (send them to GED instead)
#5: Make the parents responsible for the students attendance (fine or even jail time)
 
The US Education system is widely considered to lag behind other developed nations, and this is not a new phenomenon. Without delving into current politics, was it possible to make the American More money isn't the problem. The Nebraska public school districts spend on average per child over $12,000 per year (teaching only 9 months a year). I spent $9,800 for my oldest child per year to attend a private Catholic high school. My youngest refused to attend that same Catholic high school and instead attended the local public high school.
My eldest child graduated with a much better analytical understanding of the world and more independent yet had same grades as youngest

#1: Get rid of public school unions
#2: Stop funding high school athletics and spend all that money on classroom teaching
#3: Minimize non-classroom teaching administration. Many schools in our area have up to 8 deans (2 for each grade) yet they and their staff support don't teach
#4: Make it easier to kick disruptive students out of school (send them to GED instead)
The US Education system is widely considered to lag behind other developed nations, and this is not a new phenomenon. Without delving into current politics, was it possible to make the American Education system not fall behind the other developed countries? The US high school system in particular is and was considered weak compared to Western Europe, Japan, etc.
I think it's all about the books. It is necessary to accustom the child to books from childhood. And then the child himself will want to read. Here's what you have read for the last six months, what kind of books?
Let's say I read https://freebooksummary.com/category/tangerine, I literally finished yesterday. And you ?
 
Completely whore out to corporate interests. Much of the criticism of the American education system is usually a code word for how it doesn't prepare people for getting jobs.

Privatize the entire education system as far as the decision making process is concerned (but funding still from government, we know corporate don't actually want to pay for any of that). Let the largest 100 private corporations (combination of net worth and/or people employed) dictate the curriculum, the tests, etc. Integration of internship/practical applications at the high school level so as to make the pipeline from school to workplace as smooth as possible.
 
Completely whore out to corporate interests. Much of the criticism of the American education system is usually a code word for how it doesn't prepare people for getting jobs.

This has been reflected from the 1960s in the conversion of the upper six years of schooling from a general education to 'college prep'. The mantra of everyone attending a university led to the neglect of broader more balanced education, & the marginalization of skills education or vocational education. Over the past fifty years I've hearing from educators how they first must teach the students to "think". What I see missing are the tools or contact to think with the abstract logic of Algebra is a bit disconnected & isolated from reality where the student lacks a parallel grounding in the long dismissed 'practical math'. For decades I've been watching coworkers and employees struggle with basics like reading a tape measure, or converting length to area, despite excellent grades in high school mathematics classes. Being able to solve for three unknowns in Algebra is great, but can you correctly increase a mixture of several components by 1.33%. Its a no brainer, but I regularly meet well educated 20 year olds who cant do it.
 
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