List of monarchs III

POD : Canada declares independence in 1781.

Kings and Queens of Canada:

1789 - 1810: Augusta I ( House of Hanover ) [1]
1810 - 1812: Charles I (House of Fitzroy) [2]

Princess_Augusta_in_1782.jpg

Augusta I, Queen of Canada
[1] In a odd turn of events, after a series of Political scandals that caused the popularity of the British Monarchy to go down drastically in the remaining British North American Colonies, and with the costs of the American Revolution being higher than expected, Canada declared it's own independence in December of 1781. King George III was shocked by this sudden turn of events and the American revolutionaries down south celebrated.

However, surprising the Americans, and the British mothership, the Canadians still wanted a Monarchy; but they wanted their own Monarchy that they could feel proud of; a Canadian Monarch. William Pitt the Younger, who became Prime Minister in 1783 was sympathetic to the Canadians; and convinced the British Parliament and King George himself to approve the independence movement which was granted in 1787 with the Treaty of London.

The next question became who to choose as the new Canadian Monarch. Several potential canidates were considered. Finally, the Canadian Parliament agreed on Princess Augusta Sophia of Great Britain, daughter of George III. Contrary to expectations, It was a perfect choice since she was willing to give up her " Britishness " to embrace a Canadian identity while still having a connection to the British homeland. Augusta was crowned Queen of Canada in May of 1789 to cheering crowds in Newark.

Marriage : As part of the transitional process, Augusta had to marry much to her father's chagrin. Several contenders from Europe sought her hand. Once again, shocking her father, Augusta chose a very low ranking English Noble; Lord Charles Fitzroy, son of the 3rd Duke of Grafton. They were married two weeks after the Treaty of London was signed. It was an odd, and yet happy marriage. Augusta and Charles grew to love each other. They were both Liberal in their Political outlook; and did not like absolute monarchy. Charles became a social activist during his wife's reign, pushing for Native rights and the rights of Catholics. They had 4 sons who all lived to adulthood. Somewhat unusually for royals of the time, Augusta and Charles were hands on parents often refusing help from Maids.

Reign : It was a relatively peaceful reign. Augusta was mostly hands off. The Religious tensions between the Catholics and Protestants were solved with the Religious Freedom Act of 1801, making Canada a religiously neutral country although Augusta herself remained a devout Anglican. The written Canadian Consitution limited the Monarch's powers, although in times of War, Emergency powers of the Monarch were limitless. The latter was proven when Augusta took direct control of the Canadian Military in 1792 to crush a Republican Rebellion in Montreal known as ironically, Augusta's rebellion. Upon investigation, it was discovered that the rebellion was funded by the American Government. Despite the anger at the American government, Augusta never pushed for War, seeing as if Canada ( and the US ) were still weak underdeveloped countries. Relations between the two countries however were never the same again. Other than the rebellion however, Canada as stated was at relative peace. The economy grew in bounds during her reign and trade relations with the major powers in Europe were established. Augusta was wise to not invovle the fetus country in the French revolutionary Wars. A New Canadian identity was developed under Augusta’s and Charles’s guidance.

Her death came in a tragic accident in Jan of 1810. While inspecting Canadian troops as part of her " annual troop review ", a musket accidently discharged, striking Augusta in the head. She died instantly. The death of the Young Queen at just 41 years old brought great sadness to the growing Kingdom. She was succeeded by her son Charles.

[2] Charles was born in 1790 to Charles Fitzroy and Augusta I as their first son. His birth was widely celebrated across Canada, being the first Prince to be born on Canadian soil. He was invested as the Prince of Quebec on his first birthday, which would become the title that the heir apparent would hold. Growing up to become a capable and intelligent young man, Charles was able to speak multiple languages including French.

Becoming King of Canada after the tragic death of his mother Augusta in 1810, many had high hopes that Charles's reign would see Canada become the main independent power on the North American continent. This wasn't the case as in 1812 the United States and their ally France launched an invasion of Canada. The young kingdom would be quickly overrun due to the inexperience of the Canadian Royal Army and resulted in a American-French victory. Charles was forced off his throne and went to the United Kingdom in exile, dying there in 1814 after contracting tuberculosis. He was replaced as King of Canada by _______.
 
POD: Canada declares independence in 1781:

Kings and Queens of Canada:
1789 - 1810: Augusta I (House of Hanover) [1]
1810 - 1812: Charles I (House of Fitzroy) [2]
1812 - 1867: William I (House of Fitzroy) [3]



Princess_Augusta_in_1782.jpg


Augusta I, Queen of Canada
[1] In a odd turn of events, after a series of Political scandals that caused the popularity of the British Monarchy to go down drastically in the remaining British North American Colonies, and with the costs of the American Revolution being higher than expected, Canada declared it's own independence in December of 1781. King George III was shocked by this sudden turn of events and the American revolutionaries down south celebrated.

However, surprising the Americans, and the British mothership, the Canadians still wanted a Monarchy; but they wanted their own Monarchy that they could feel proud of; a Canadian Monarch. William Pitt the Younger, who became Prime Minister in 1783 was sympathetic to the Canadians; and convinced the British Parliament and King George himself to approve the independence movement which was granted in 1787 with the Treaty of London.

The next question became who to choose as the new Canadian Monarch. Several potential canidates were considered. Finally, the Canadian Parliament agreed on Princess Augusta Sophia of Great Britain, daughter of George III. Contrary to expectations, It was a perfect choice since she was willing to give up her " Britishness " to embrace a Canadian identity while still having a connection to the British homeland. Augusta was crowned Queen of Canada in May of 1789 to cheering crowds in Newark.

Marriage : As part of the transitional process, Augusta had to marry much to her father's chagrin. Several contenders from Europe sought her hand. Once again, shocking her father, Augusta chose a very low ranking English Noble; Lord Charles Fitzroy, son of the 3rd Duke of Grafton. They were married two weeks after the Treaty of London was signed. It was an odd, and yet happy marriage. Augusta and Charles grew to love each other. They were both Liberal in their Political outlook; and did not like absolute monarchy. Charles became a social activist during his wife's reign, pushing for Native rights and the rights of Catholics. They had 4 sons who all lived to adulthood. Somewhat unusually for royals of the time, Augusta and Charles were hands on parents often refusing help from Maids.

Reign : It was a relatively peaceful reign. Augusta was mostly hands off. The Religious tensions between the Catholics and Protestants were solved with the Religious Freedom Act of 1801, making Canada a religiously neutral country although Augusta herself remained a devout Anglican. The written Canadian Consitution limited the Monarch's powers, although in times of War, Emergency powers of the Monarch were limitless. The latter was proven when Augusta took direct control of the Canadian Military in 1792 to crush a Republican Rebellion in Montreal known as ironically, Augusta's rebellion. Upon investigation, it was discovered that the rebellion was funded by the American Government. Despite the anger at the American government, Augusta never pushed for War, seeing as if Canada ( and the US ) were still weak underdeveloped countries. Relations between the two countries however were never the same again. Other than the rebellion however, Canada as stated was at relative peace. The economy grew in bounds during her reign and trade relations with the major powers in Europe were established. Augusta was wise to not invovle the fetus country in the French revolutionary Wars. A New Canadian identity was developed under Augusta’s and Charles’s guidance.

Her death came in a tragic accident in Jan of 1810. While inspecting Canadian troops as part of her " annual troop review ", a musket accidently discharged, striking Augusta in the head. She died instantly. The death of the Young Queen at just 41 years old brought great sadness to the growing Kingdom. She was succeeded by her son Charles.

[2] Charles was born in 1790 to Charles Fitzroy and Augusta I as their first son. His birth was widely celebrated across Canada, being the first Prince to be born on Canadian soil. He was invested as the Prince of Quebec on his first birthday, which would become the title that the heir apparent would hold. Growing up to become a capable and intelligent young man, Charles was able to speak multiple languages including French.

Becoming King of Canada after the tragic death of his mother Augusta in 1810, many had high hopes that Charles's reign would see Canada become the main independent power on the North American continent. This wasn't the case as in 1812 the United States and their ally France launched an invasion of Canada. The young kingdom would be quickly overrun due to the inexperience of the Canadian Royal Army and resulted in a American-French victory. Charles was forced off his throne and went to the United Kingdom in exile, dying there in 1814 after contracting tuberculosis. He was replaced as King of Canada by his brother, William.

453885CC-4C39-4D42-B2B9-BCBA438FEB17.jpeg

William I, King of Canada

[3] William was the second son of Queen Augusta I and Charles Fitzroy having been born in the Spring of 1792 having been named after William Pitt the Younger as a token of gratitude for not only had secured independence from Great Britain but was also the one who first suggested Sophia Augusta as Queen of Canada. William was never initially expected to become King of Canada, at least at first, but was instead was groomed to become something of a statesman of sorts learning more about literature, history, and regional development instead of military tactics and foreign diplomacy like his older brother had been taught. However, as American and French soldiers began marching towards the Gates of York during the War of 1812 many began to consider a peace agreement where King Charles would abdicated in favor of William which the idea would eventually be adopted as part of the official peace treaty. Amongst this, the Canadian Government also had to recognize the disputed border territories with the United States as American territory and also had to give autonomy to the ethnic French in Quebec.

William’s first decisions as King were to help rebuild and repay the damages caused by the war approving the National Bank Act of 1813 which founded the Canadian National Bank and also increased tariffs to help improve the economy. He also sponsored projects that would help to rebuild, improve, and expand several buildings that had either been damaged or destroyed during the war. By 1823 the Canadian economy and industry would be returned to normal and one its way to improve more. William initially faced resentment from a few upper class members of society, most of whom were friends and supporters of his older brother, Charles I, and thus favored him over the current King, and wanted him to return and take back the throne. However, after the 2 year period after Charles I’s abdication, no serious move to put him back on the throne was ever made and after his death in 1814 the idea of overthrowing William I virtually became unheard of. William’s next action as King was to find a wife, despite being 20 years old at the time of his ascension to the throne, it was well believed that a Queen-Consort would help to bring much needed stability to his reign. After a short search William decided he would marry Princess Caroline of Denmark, the firstborn daughter of King Frederick VI of Denmark, after traveling to Copenhagen to discuss a trade dispute caused by the increased tariffs and would befriend the King while there. After returning home William would write a letter to Frederick VI about a marriage between his daughter and himself to which after a few weeks would receive news back that the King would be in favor of a marriage. After the wedding plans were made the Danish Royal Family would travel to the Canadian capital city of York in 1814 and the two would married in the town square for all to witness a few days later.

After the marriage, William would make sure to get to know his wife before any heir was to be produced and the two would spend the better part of a year getting to one another to find that had excellent chemistry with each learning each other’s language so they wouldn’t have to rely on a translator and could be alone together. Eventually William and Caroline would produce offspring having 7 children in all between 1816 and 1827 with 4 sons and 3 daughters that would all live to adulthood. Between his marriage and 1847, William would begin to push for industrialization signing laws into effect that would move away from a agricultural and hunting based system such as building railroads and factories across the Kingdom. After several years of relative peace William would face a major internal crisis after the Panic of 1847 many French-speaking workers in Quebec would cause a providence wide shutdown claiming autonomy rights after many English-speaking bosses would use the Panic as an excuse to lay off these workers and replace them with more English-speaking workers. After several days of negotiations the Government was able to an agreement where the protesters would be guaranteed the write to work and that would end the issue for now.

In 1859 the Kingdom of Canada would almost go to war with the United States again after the Northwest Boundary Dispute, otherwise known as the “Pig War”, over the San Juan Islands but the conflict would be resolved by King William after he would himself go to the island where he would negotiate with General Winfield Scott of the United States to have the islands be split through the San Juan Channel. Before he would leave he would quip, “Let us just eat the damn pig and be over with it!” In 1861 the American Civil War would begin and despite several moves by Members of Parliament to join the war on the side of the Confederates in order to regain land lost in the War of 1812 William would be against it due to have abolished slavery in the 1850s. In 1864 William would however intervene in the Second Schleswig War due to his wife being related to the Danish Royals. William would use his family ties to get in touch with his first cousin, King George V of Hanover, and would convince him to pressure the Austrians and Prussians in to withdrawing from Denmark. The Austrians and Prussians would initially refuse but would accept after threatening to get his other first cousin, Queen Victoria of Great Britain, involved. This, along with possible intervention from the Second French Empire who was beginning to eye the Saarland made the Austrians and Prussians give in and withdraw from Denmark. This would be a victory for Canada and Denmark and would bring the nations closer together as a result.

After 55 long years of reign, William would die of natural causes in the late Summer of 1867 and would be succeeded by ________.
 
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POD: Canada declares independence in 1781:

Kings and Queens of Canada:
1789 - 1810: Augusta I (House of Hanover) [1]
1810 - 1812: Charles I (House of Fitzroy) [2]
1812 - 1867: William I (House of Fitzroy) [3]
1867 - 1888: Charles II (House of Fitzroy) [4]



Princess_Augusta_in_1782.jpg

Augusta I, Queen of Canada
[1] In a odd turn of events, after a series of Political scandals that caused the popularity of the British Monarchy to go down drastically in the remaining British North American Colonies, and with the costs of the American Revolution being higher than expected, Canada declared it's own independence in December of 1781. King George III was shocked by this sudden turn of events and the American revolutionaries down south celebrated.

However, surprising the Americans, and the British mothership, the Canadians still wanted a Monarchy; but they wanted their own Monarchy that they could feel proud of; a Canadian Monarch. William Pitt the Younger, who became Prime Minister in 1783 was sympathetic to the Canadians; and convinced the British Parliament and King George himself to approve the independence movement which was granted in 1787 with the Treaty of London.

The next question became who to choose as the new Canadian Monarch. Several potential canidates were considered. Finally, the Canadian Parliament agreed on Princess Augusta Sophia of Great Britain, daughter of George III. Contrary to expectations, It was a perfect choice since she was willing to give up her " Britishness " to embrace a Canadian identity while still having a connection to the British homeland. Augusta was crowned Queen of Canada in May of 1789 to cheering crowds in Newark.

Marriage : As part of the transitional process, Augusta had to marry much to her father's chagrin. Several contenders from Europe sought her hand. Once again, shocking her father, Augusta chose a very low ranking English Noble; Lord Charles Fitzroy, son of the 3rd Duke of Grafton. They were married two weeks after the Treaty of London was signed. It was an odd, and yet happy marriage. Augusta and Charles grew to love each other. They were both Liberal in their Political outlook; and did not like absolute monarchy. Charles became a social activist during his wife's reign, pushing for Native rights and the rights of Catholics. They had 4 sons who all lived to adulthood. Somewhat unusually for royals of the time, Augusta and Charles were hands on parents often refusing help from Maids.

Reign : It was a relatively peaceful reign. Augusta was mostly hands off. The Religious tensions between the Catholics and Protestants were solved with the Religious Freedom Act of 1801, making Canada a religiously neutral country although Augusta herself remained a devout Anglican. The written Canadian Consitution limited the Monarch's powers, although in times of War, Emergency powers of the Monarch were limitless. The latter was proven when Augusta took direct control of the Canadian Military in 1792 to crush a Republican Rebellion in Montreal known as ironically, Augusta's rebellion. Upon investigation, it was discovered that the rebellion was funded by the American Government. Despite the anger at the American government, Augusta never pushed for War, seeing as if Canada ( and the US ) were still weak underdeveloped countries. Relations between the two countries however were never the same again. Other than the rebellion however, Canada as stated was at relative peace. The economy grew in bounds during her reign and trade relations with the major powers in Europe were established. Augusta was wise to not invovle the fetus country in the French revolutionary Wars. A New Canadian identity was developed under Augusta’s and Charles’s guidance.

Her death came in a tragic accident in Jan of 1810. While inspecting Canadian troops as part of her " annual troop review ", a musket accidently discharged, striking Augusta in the head. She died instantly. The death of the Young Queen at just 41 years old brought great sadness to the growing Kingdom. She was succeeded by her son Charles.

[2] Charles was born in 1790 to Charles Fitzroy and Augusta I as their first son. His birth was widely celebrated across Canada, being the first Prince to be born on Canadian soil. He was invested as the Prince of Quebec on his first birthday, which would become the title that the heir apparent would hold. Growing up to become a capable and intelligent young man, Charles was able to speak multiple languages including French.

Becoming King of Canada after the tragic death of his mother Augusta in 1810, many had high hopes that Charles's reign would see Canada become the main independent power on the North American continent. This wasn't the case as in 1812 the United States and their ally France launched an invasion of Canada. The young kingdom would be quickly overrun due to the inexperience of the Canadian Royal Army and resulted in a American-French victory. Charles was forced off his throne and went to the United Kingdom in exile, dying there in 1814 after contracting tuberculosis. He was replaced as King of Canada by his brother, William.

View attachment 791169
William I, King of Canada

[3] William was the second son of Queen Augusta I and Charles Fitzroy having been born in the Spring of 1792 having been named after William Pitt the Younger as a token of gratitude for not only had secured independence from Great Britain but was also the one who first suggested Sophia Augusta as Queen of Canada. William was never initially expected to become King of Canada, at least at first, but was instead was groomed to become something of a statesman of sorts learning more about literature, history, and regional development instead of military tactics and foreign diplomacy like his older brother had been taught. However, as American and French soldiers began marching towards the Gates of York during the War of 1812 many began to consider a peace agreement where King Charles would abdicated in favor of William which the idea would eventually be adopted as part of the official peace treaty. Amongst this, the Canadian Government also had to recognize the disputed border territories with the United States as American territory and also had to give autonomy to the ethnic French in Quebec.

William’s first decisions as King were to help rebuild and repay the damages caused by the war approving the National Bank Act of 1813 which founded the Canadian National Bank and also increased tariffs to help improve the economy. He also sponsored projects that would help to rebuild, improve, and expand several buildings that had either been damaged or destroyed during the war. By 1823 the Canadian economy and industry would be returned to normal and one its way to improve more. William initially faced resentment from a few upper class members of society, most of whom were friends and supporters of his older brother, Charles I, and thus favored him over the current King, and wanted him to return and take back the throne. However, after the 2 year period after Charles I’s abdication, no serious move to put him back on the throne was ever made and after his death in 1814 the idea of overthrowing William I virtually became unheard of. William’s next action as King was to find a wife, despite being 20 years old at the time of his ascension to the throne, it was well believed that a Queen-Consort would help to bring much needed stability to his reign. After a short search William decided he would marry Princess Caroline of Denmark, the firstborn daughter of King Frederick VI of Denmark, after traveling to Copenhagen to discuss a trade dispute caused by the increased tariffs and would befriend the King while there. After returning home William would write a letter to Frederick VI about a marriage between his daughter and himself to which after a few weeks would receive news back that the King would be in favor of a marriage. After the wedding plans were made the Danish Royal Family would travel to the Canadian capital city of York in 1814 and the two would married in the town square for all to witness a few days later.

After the marriage, William would make sure to get to know his wife before any heir was to be produced and the two would spend the better part of a year getting to one another to find that had excellent chemistry with each learning each other’s language so they wouldn’t have to rely on a translator and could be alone together. Eventually William and Caroline would produce offspring having 7 children in all between 1816 and 1827 with 4 sons and 3 daughters that would all live to adulthood. Between his marriage and 1847, William would begin to push for industrialization signing laws into effect that would move away from a agricultural and hunting based system such as building railroads and factories across the Kingdom. After several years of relative peace William would face a major internal crisis after the Panic of 1847 many French-speaking workers in Quebec would cause a providence wide shutdown claiming autonomy rights after many English-speaking bosses would use the Panic as an excuse to lay off these workers and replace them with more English-speaking workers. After several days of negotiations the Government was able to an agreement where the protesters would be guaranteed the write to work and that would end the issue for now.

In 1859 the Kingdom of Canada would almost go to war with the United States again after the Northwest Boundary Dispute, otherwise known as the “Pig War”, over the San Juan Islands but the conflict would be resolved by King William after he would himself go to the island where he would negotiate with General Winfield Scott of the United States to have the islands be split through the San Juan Channel. Before he would leave he would quip, “Let us just eat the damn pig and be over with it!” In 1861 the American Civil War would begin and despite several moves by Members of Parliament to join the war on the side of the Confederates in order to regain land lost in the War of 1812 William would be against it due to have abolished slavery in the 1850s. In 1864 William would however intervene in the Second Schleswig War due to his wife being related to the Danish Royals. William would use his family ties to get in touch with his first cousin, King George V of Hanover, and would convince him to pressure the Austrians and Prussians in to withdrawing from Denmark. The Austrians and Prussians would initially refuse but would accept after threatening to get his other first cousin, Queen Victoria of Great Britain, involved. This, along with possible intervention from the Second French Empire who was beginning to eye the Saarland made the Austrians and Prussians give in and withdraw from Denmark. This would be a victory for Canada and Denmark and would bring the nations closer together as a result.

After 55 long years of reign, William would die of natural causes in the late Summer of 1867 and would be succeeded by Charles II.

Charles%2C_Duke_of_Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Gl%C3%BCcksburg_%281813-1878%29.jpg

Charles II, King of Canada

[4] Charles (after his uncle and paternal grandfather) Frederick (after his maternal grandfather) George (after his paternal great-grandfather) was born in 1816 as the first child of William I and Princess Caroline of Denmark. Being made Prince of Quebec at the age of 16 in 1832, Charles developed an interest in the culture of the Quebecois people after touring the province in 1837. He also learnt to speak multiple languages (including French), wrote several pieces of poetry, and enjoyed talking walks around York.

While on a vist to France in 1841, Charles would meet King Louis Philippe I’s daughter Princess Françoise of Orleans (b. 1816). After reading several of his poems to her, Charles and Françoise quickly fell in love and would write letters to each other after the former went home. The two would eventually marry in a lavish wedding ceremony that took place at the Cathedral of Notre-Dame de Québec in the Spring of 1845. Charles and Françoise's love for each other continued to grow after they got married and had nine children together, with their 5 daughters and 4 sons all surviving to adulthood.

During the Panic of 1847, Charles was instrumental in helping to negotiate the argeement that ended the crisis, which increased his personal popularity in Quebec. The following year Charles' father in-law Louis Philippe I of France was overthrown during the 1848 Revolutions. Using his family ties to the French royals, Charles was able to convince his father William to allow Louis Philippe and his family to settle in the Quebecois city Montreal.

In July of 1867, Charles became King of Canada following his father’s death. Some notable events that happened in the reign of Charles II include the purchase of Alaska from Russia in 1867, the 100th anniversary of Canada’s independence in 1881, and the completion of the Canadian Pacific Railway in 1885. Charles passed away in 1888 at the age of 72, with his wife Françoise outliving him by ten years. ______ would ascend throne as the new reigning monarch of Canada.
 
POD: Canada declares independence in 1781:

Kings and Queens of Canada:
1789 - 1810: Augusta I (House of Hanover) [1]
1810 - 1812: Charles I (House of Fitzroy) [2]
1812 - 1867: William I (House of Fitzroy)) [3]
1867 - 1888: Charles II (House of Fitzroy) [4]
1888 - 1929: William II (House of Canada) [5]


Princess_Augusta_in_1782.jpg
Augusta I, Queen of Canada
[1] In an odd turn of events, after a series of Political scandals that caused the popularity of the British Monarchy to go down drastically in the remaining British North American Colonies, and with the costs of the American Revolution being higher than expected, Canada declared it's own independence in December of 1781. King George III was shocked by this sudden turn of events and the American revolutionaries down south celebrated.

However, surprising the Americans, and the British mothership, the Canadians still wanted a Monarchy; but they wanted a Monarchy that they could feel proud of; a Canadian Monarch. William Pitt the Younger, who became Prime Minister in 1783 was sympathetic to the Canadians; and convinced the British Parliament and King George himself to approve the independence movement which was granted in 1787 with the Treaty of London.

The next question became who to choose as the new Canadian Monarch. Several potential candidates were considered. Finally, the Canadian Parliament agreed on Princess Augusta Sophia of Great Britain, daughter of George III. Contrary to expectations, It was a perfect choice since she was willing to give up her " Britishness " to embrace a Canadian identity while still having a connection to the British homeland. Augusta was crowned Queen of Canada in May of 1789 to cheer crowds in Newark.

Marriage: As part of the transitional process, Augusta had to marry much to her father's chagrin. Several contenders from Europe sought her hand. Once again, shocking her father, Augusta chose a very low-ranking English Noble; Lord Charles Fitzroy, son of the 3rd Duke of Grafton. They were married two weeks after the Treaty of London was signed. It was an odd, and yet happy marriage. Augusta and Charles grew to love each other. They were both Liberal in their Political outlook and did not like absolute monarchy. Charles became a social activist during his wife's reign, pushing for Native rights and the rights of Catholics. They had 4 sons who all lived to adulthood. Somewhat unusual for royals of the time, Augusta and Charles were hands-on parents often refusing help from Maids.

Reign: It was a relatively peaceful reign. Augusta was mostly hands-off. The Religious tensions between the Catholics and Protestants were solved with the Religious Freedom Act of 1801, making Canada a religiously neutral country although Augusta herself remained a devout Anglican. The written Canadian Consitution limited the Monarch's powers, although, in times of War, the Emergency powers of the Monarch were limitless. The latter was proven when Augusta took direct control of the Canadian Military in 1792 to crush a Republican Rebellion in Montreal known as ironically, Augusta's rebellion. Upon investigation, it was discovered that the rebellion was funded by the American Government. Despite the anger at the American government, Augusta never pushed for War, seeing as if Canada ( and the US ) were still weak underdeveloped countries. Relations between the two countries however were never the same again. Other than the rebellion, however, Canada as stated was at relative peace. The economy grew in bounds during her reign and trade relations with the major powers in Europe were established. Augusta was wise to not invoke the fetus country in the French Revolutionary Wars. A New Canadian identity was developed under Augusta’s and Charles’s guidance.

Her death came in a tragic accident in Jan of 1810. While inspecting Canadian troops as part of her " annual troop review ", a musket accidentally discharged, striking Augusta in the head. She died instantly. The death of the Young Queen at just 41 years old brought great sadness to the growing Kingdom. She was succeeded by her son Charles.

[2] Charles was born in 1790 to Charles Fitzroy and Augusta I as their first son. His birth was widely celebrated across Canada, being the first Prince to be born on Canadian soil. He was invested as the Prince of Quebec on his first birthday, which would become the title that the heir apparent would hold. Growing up to become a capable and intelligent young man, Charles was able to speak multiple languages including French.

Becoming King of Canada after the tragic death of his mother Augusta in 1810, many had high hopes that Charles's reign would see Canada become the main independent power on the North American continent. This wasn't the case as in 1812 the United States and their ally France launched an invasion of Canada. The young kingdom would be quickly overrun due to the inexperience of the Canadian Royal Army which resulted in an American-French victory. Charles was forced off his throne and went to the United Kingdom in exile, dying there in 1814 after contracting tuberculosis. He was replaced as King of Canada by his brother, William.


453885CC-4C39-4D42-B2B9-BCBA438FEB17.jpeg

William I, King of Canada

[3] William was the second son of Queen Augusta I and Charles Fitzroy having been born in the Spring of 1792 having been named after William Pitt the Younger as a token of gratitude for not only had secured independence from Great Britain but also the one first suggested Sophia Augusta as Queen of Canada. William was never initially expected to become King of Canada, at least at first, but was instead groomed to become something of a statesman of sorts learning more about literature, history, and regional development instead of military tactics and foreign diplomacy like his older brother had been taught. However, as American and French soldiers began marching towards the Gates of York during the War of 1812 many began to consider a peace agreement where King Charles would abdicate in favour of William which the idea would eventually be adopted as part of the official peace treaty. Amongst this, the Canadian Government also had to recognize the disputed border territories with the United States as American territory and also had to give autonomy to the ethnic French in Quebec.

William’s first decisions as King were to help rebuild and repay the damages caused by the war approving the National Bank Act of 1813 which founded the Canadian National Bank and also increased tariffs to help improve the economy. He also sponsored projects that would help to rebuild, improve, and expand several buildings that had either been damaged or destroyed during the war. By 1823 the Canadian economy and industry would be returned to normal and on its way to improve more. William initially faced resentment from a few upper-class members of society, most of whom were friends and supporters of his older brother, Charles I, and thus favoured him over the current King, and wanted him to return and take back the throne. However, after the 2 years after Charles I’s abdication, no serious move to put him back on the throne was ever made and after his death in 1814 the idea of overthrowing William I virtually became unheard of. William’s next action as King was to find a wife, despite being 20 years old at the time of his ascension to the throne, it was well believed that a Queen-Consort would help to bring much-needed stability to his reign. After a short search, William decided he would marry Princess Caroline of Denmark, the firstborn daughter of King Frederick VI of Denmark, after travelling to Copenhagen to discuss a trade dispute caused by the increased tariffs and would befriend the King while there. After returning home William would write a letter to Frederick VI about a marriage between his daughter and himself to which after a few weeks would receive news back that the King would be in favour of marriage. After the wedding plans were made the Danish Royal Family would travel to the Canadian capital city of York in 1814 and the two would marry in the town square for all to witness a few days later.

After the marriage, William would make sure to get to know his wife before any heir was to be produced and the two would spend the better part of a year getting to one another to find that had excellent chemistry with each learning each other’s language so they wouldn’t have to rely on a translator and could be alone together. Eventually, William and Caroline would produce offspring having 7 children in all between 1816 and 1827 with 4 sons and 3 daughters that would all live to adulthood. Between his marriage and 1847, William began to push for industrialization signing laws into effect that would move away from an agricultural and hunting-based system such as building railroads and factories across the Kingdom. After several years of relative peace, William would face a major internal crisis after the Panic of 1847 many French-speaking workers in Quebec would cause a providence-wide shutdown claiming autonomy rights after many English-speaking bosses would use the Panic as an excuse to lay off these workers and replace them with more English-speaking workers. After several days of negotiations, the Government was able to an agreement where the protesters would be guaranteed the right to work and that would end the issue for now.

In 1859 the Kingdom of Canada would almost go to war with the United States again after the Northwest Boundary Dispute, otherwise known as the “Pig War”, over the San Juan Islands but the conflict would be resolved by King William after he would himself go to the island where he would negotiate with General Winfield Scott of the United States to have the islands be split through the San Juan Channel. Before he would leave he would quip, “Let us just eat the damn pig and be over with it!” In 1861 the American Civil War would begin and despite several moves by Members of Parliament to join the war on the side of the Confederates to regain land lost in the War of 1812 William would be against it due to having abolished slavery in the 1850s. In 1864 William would however intervene in the Second Schleswig War due to his wife being related to the Danish Royals. William would use his family ties to get in touch with his first cousin, King George V of Hanover, and would convince him to pressure the Austrians and Prussians into withdrawing from Denmark. The Austrians and Prussians would initially refuse but would accept after threatening to get his other first cousin, Queen Victoria of Great Britain, involved. This, along with possible intervention from the Second French Empire was beginning to eye the Saarland making the Austrians and Prussians give in and withdraw from Denmark. This would be a victory for Canada and Denmark and bring the nations closer together.

After 55 long years of reign, William would die of natural causes in the late Summer of 1867 and be succeeded by Charles II.

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Charles II, King of Canada
[4] Charles (after his uncle and paternal grandfather) Frederick (after his maternal grandfather) George (after his paternal great-grandfather) were born in 1816 as the first child of William I and Princess Caroline of Denmark. Being made Prince of Quebec at the age of 16 in 1832, Charles developed an interest in the culture of the Quebecois people after touring the province in 1837. He also learnt to speak multiple languages (including French), wrote several pieces of poetry, and enjoyed taking walks around York.

While on a visit to France in 1841, Charles would meet King Louis Philippe I’s daughter Princess Françoise of Orleans (b. 1816). After reading several of his poems to her, Charles and Françoise quickly fell in love and would write letters to each other after the former went home. The two would eventually marry in a lavish wedding ceremony that took place at the Cathedral of Notre Dame de Québec in the Spring of 1845. Charles and Françoise's love for each other continued to grow after they got married and had nine children together, with their 5 daughters and 4 sons all surviving to adulthood.

During the Panic of 1847, Charles was instrumental in helping to negotiate the agreement that ended the crisis, which increased his popularity in Quebec. The following year Charles' father-in-law Louis Philippe I of France was overthrown during the 1848 Revolutions. Using his family ties to the French royals, Charles was able to convince his father William to allow Louis Philippe and his family to settle in the Quebecois city of Montreal.

In July of 1867, Charles became King of Canada following his father’s death. Some notable events that happened in the reign of Charles II include the purchase of Alaska from Russia in 1867, the 100th anniversary of Canada’s independence in 1881, and the completion of the Canadian Pacific Railway in 1885. Charles passed away in 1888 at the age of 72, with his wife Françoise outliving him by ten years. His son William would ascend the throne as the new reigning monarch of Canada.

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William II
[5] William II was born in 1846 and would ascend to the throne in 1888 when he was 42 years old. When he and his second cousin, the future Edward VII, first met each other, everyone remarked on their resemblance. Indeed, once the two of them spent a full week impersonating one another, only stopping when Edwards' wife, Alexandra, tried to kiss William.

He married his second cousin, Princess Victoria, the eldest daughter of Queen Victoria. It was a strange match due to how much the crown prince resembled his wife's brother, and many jokes were made about their bedroom life. Incest jokes aside, they had a relatively happy marriage with seven children but only five children, four boys and one girl, survived to adulthood.

Before becoming king, William was a physician. This caused him to have an unusually healthy lifestyle; proper diet and regular exercise which he made his children follow. When word came that his father was ill, William was jogging across the palace. Charles II died two weeks later, and William II ascended to the throne.

His first action was changing the name of the royal house. This was because the name FitzRoy had connotations of bastardy, as his great-grandfather, Charles FitzRoy was the great-grandson of Henry FitzRoy, the bastard son of Charles II of England. William didn't want the Monarch of Canada to advertise the fact that they are descended from bastards, and from then on, members of the royal family had the last name of d'Canada. He also changed the law of succession so that, should the Canadian monarch be a woman, the children of the woman would be members of the House of Canada. William's desire for the kingdom to retain the family name was caused by the ascension of his second cousin, Edward VII, which ended 187 years of Hanoverian rule.

The true first act of his reign was the increased militarization of the Canadian army, which strengthened the security of the Canadian border. William had never trusted the Americans and feared that they would cause another revolt, so he decided to improve the army just in case. This rapid militarization of the border caused the Americans to respond in kind, and before you knew it, both sides were anticipating a war. Thankfully, none followed, as William had informed his generals that he didn't want anyone to do anything that might indicate war.

William spent a significant amount of time negotiating economic treaties with various countries and encouraging trade within his countries. He made laws that allowed women to vote, ended segregationist policies, and enacted civil rights laws that allowed people of different cultures, ethnicities, and religions equal protection and rights. He also spent a lot of time and effort raising his children and grandchildren and teaching all of them, not just the heir apparent, how to rule the state. He reasoned that if the heir died, an incompetent would not ascend to the thone.

One major facet of his reign was how he emphasised health and cleanliness. He built numerous hospitals and made sure the country's sewer system was up-to-date. The rest of his reign was a quiet one; the economy continued to grow, new towns and cities were created, and technology was developed. William died at the age of 83, surrounded by his children, grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren.
 
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Augusta I of Canada (1768-1810), r. 1789-1810, m. Lord Charles Fitzroy
- 1) Charles I of Canada (1790-1814, r. 1810-1812, didn’t marry
- 2) William I of Canada (1792-1867), r. 1812-1867, m. 1814, Princess Caroline of Denmark (1793-1881)
a) Charles II of Canada (1816-1888), r. 1867-1888, m. 1845, Princess Françoise of Orleans (1816-1898)​
- 1) William II of Canada (1846-1929), r. 1888-1929, m. Princess Victoria of the United Kingdom (1840-1901)​
a) Five children (4 sons and 1 daughter), with two others dying before reaching adulthood​
- 2) Eight other children (4 sons and 5 daughters)​
b) Six other children (4 sons and 3 daughters)​
- 3) Two other sons
 
"But only five survived to adulthood"
It was a typo sorry about that.
So World War 1 didnt happen in this timeline?
Depends on the next claimant. It didn't happen during William II's era because when Franz Ferdinand died, Germany didn't help Austria in pressuring Serbia. This was because OTL Princess Victoria was the mother to Kaiser Willhelm II whereas in this TL she is married to William II, thus the Kaiser wasn't born and a more level-headed Kaiser took the throne.

However the world is still a powder keg and just needs another trigger.
 
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It was a typo sorry about that.

Depends on the next claimant. It didn't happen during William II's era because when Franz Ferdinand died, Germany didn't help Austria in pressuring Serbia. This was because OTL Princess Victoria was the mother to Kaiser Willhelm II whereas in this TL she is married to William II, thus the Kaiser wasn't born and a more level-headed Kaiser took the throne.

However the world is still a powder keg and just needs another trigger.
I am assuming also that Canada doesn't have that many overseas colonial holdings if at all, and is not actively invovled in the alliance system that enveloped Europe at this time.
 
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I am assuming also that Canada doesn't have that many overseas colonial holdings if at all, and is not actively invovled in the alliance system that enveloped Europe at this time.
Yep. What happens in Europe doesn't affect Canada. If WW1 starts, unless Canada is directly attacked, all's good.
 
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