List of monarchs III

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: Before 1900' started by Shiva, Nov 17, 2014.

  1. WillVictoria Hasn't happened yet though

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    [​IMG]
    [2] James would be succeeded by his second son Alexander, after the death of the Duke of Rothesay one year earlier. Rothesay and his wife, Barbara of Hesse, would only have three daughters before James's death: Anna, Mary, and Jean. Many feared war would break out over the princesses rights to the succession, particularly given the unpopularity of Alexander and his wife, the young Catherine Vasa.

    Catherine was an almost fanatic devotee to Lutheranism and attempted to convert the Scottish court to the faith. Many reformers saw the faith as too Catholic in its traditions and saw Catherine as ruining all their hard work. However, the Queen was popular among the Catholic south, who saw Lutheranism as more tolerable. Alexander himself had the opposite problem, being accused of "having only one concern: his own enrichment". His ascension was bemoaned by the nobility, who believed his nature was antithetical to Kingship. The King's constant covert meetings with ambassadors "taking bribes and other such things".

    The birth of a daughter, called Catherine for her mother, became the last straw. There were rumors that King Alexander planned on selling his young nieces to the highest bidders, which was met with revulsion due to their ages, given the eldest only recently turning 7 at the time. These rumors caught the ears of Robert McDonald, a young courtier of the Dowager Duchess of Rothesay. Fearing for his beloved mistress and her daughters, he took up vigilante justice. While the King was out riding with one of his many foreign friends, looking for new streams of private revenue, stopped at Cadzow Castle. McDonald covertly followed him in and, when the King went off alone for some heir, stabbed the King, reportedly screaming "Die you bastard". The news of McDonald's actions shocked the court, not least his former mistress, who called it "a ghastly thing". The short reign of King Alexander IV would be followed by that of his _____, _______
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2019
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  2. Asharella Socialistic Vmpr Bi Witch Girl

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    This is confusing. Presbyterianism at that time was much more radical than Lutheranism.... I'd already established that the nation was Presbyterian fully by the death of James V. So I don't understand what is going on here and who these Catholics hold outs are as I'd established the Catholics had fled to England and the Court was Presbyterian.

    You may not realize it, but to Presbyterians at that time Lutherans seemed like Catholics with their vestments, and candles, and incense and liturgy, and statues, and organs, and most of all, their bishops.
     
  3. Shiva Dreaming... always dreaming...

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    Something more radical than the Presbyterians would be either the Anabaptists or a Non-Trinitarian sect.
     
  4. Asharella Socialistic Vmpr Bi Witch Girl

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    Right, but Anabaptists wouldn’t be established as a national faith.
     
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  5. WillVictoria Hasn't happened yet though

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    I updated my post to make more sense, I (incorrectly obviously) underestimated how radical Presbetaryianism is.
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2019
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  6. isabella Well-Known Member

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    Is not the only thing who do not make sense in your post. Scotland follow a semi-Salic succession so daughters and female lines are excluded until the extinction of all the male branches of the Stewarts and after that the succession will go to the female/female line with the closest blood relation to the last King (reason for which Mary Stuart became heiress of her father; if the Duke of Albany had not died childless five years before James V the Crown would be his). In your TL the daughters of the Duke of Rothesay had not yet any right to the crown and are not a danger to the right to the Crown of their uncle and future cousins (as any daughter of the King would be higher than them in the line of succession if the Albany’s line is already extinct)
     
  7. WillVictoria Hasn't happened yet though

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    My theory was that there were not many male Stewarts left (maybe an incorrect assumption) and that put the girls in a higher place in the line of succession. Plus, given the King's unpopularity and suspicions that their daughter will be more Lutheran than Presbetaryian, I could see them preferring the Rothesay girls over Alexander's daughter. Basically, I assumed (which I probably shouldn't have, but oh well) that the line of succession was between Rothesay's line and Alexander's and, legitimate succession be damned, some people supported the Rothesay girls
     
  8. isabella Well-Known Member

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    Scotland’s succession worked to much like the French for that. The Rothesay girl are out until all the males died AND the the line of succession is compiled starting from the last King so they would be usurpers at the best (the bits who made less sanse are the talks about a wedding between one of the girls and the new Duke of Rothesay and Queen Catherine’s fears). The eldest girl can be King Alexander’s heiress presuntive but only if the King as neither living children or sibling
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2019
  9. WillVictoria Hasn't happened yet though

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    Ok, I edited my response to make it more accurate. Thanks for correcting me.
     
  10. isabella Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, now it work perfectly...


    P.S.: for the next poster: the successor of King Alexander can be only a younger brother, a son of a younger brother, a male cousin or his daughter (unless he had a son born before or after his death)
     
  11. Asharella Socialistic Vmpr Bi Witch Girl

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    It is incorrect- you thought along the lines of James IV's children being similar to James IV of OTL's children- with just OTL James V- but I never said that James V of TTL was the only son of James IV of TTL.

    I claim next in the Stewart line and will post later today after some errands. But for now, James V had a younger full brother, Charles Stewart, born in 1507- and he is still alive and so the heir to Alexander
     
  12. Asharella Socialistic Vmpr Bi Witch Girl

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    What if James IV of Scotland (House of Stewart) had married Maria of Aragon instead of Margaret Tudor of England, daugher and sister to kings. Thus the crowns of Scotland and England would not eventually unite, nor Scotland and England eventually become the United Kingdom?

    1488 - 1513: James IV (House of Stewart)
    1513 - 1566: James V (House of Stewart) [1]
    1566 - 1568: Alexander IV (House of Stewart) [2]
    1568 - 1584: Charles Stewart [3]



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    James V

    [1]
    In the year 1500, King James IV of Scotland, House of Stewart, married the Infanta Maria of Aragon, daughter of King Ferdinand of Aragon and Queen Isabella of Castile. She was 18 and he was 27. Therir firstborn, named after his father, was born in 1501. He was partially raised in the Higlands by Alexander Gordon, 3rd Earl of Huntly, and Sherrif of Inverness, which he was made in 1500. Gordon was the righthand man of the King in securing the north and west and he was trusted with helping raise the Prince. James IV wanted to insure that his son was not seen as Spanish, but as a true Scotsman, and thus the sending him to Inerness every summer from the age of four until his majority. When the King died in 1513 in battle with England, Gordon became co-Regent with Queen Maria, and sole regent when shortly after that she married Manuel of Portugual.

    James V, House of Stewart, always considered himself a Highlander and was beloved by the clans. In 1519 he ended the regency and married Gordon's granddaughter, Jean Campbell, keeping Gordon as an advisor until the older man's death five years later.

    Scotland was constantly at war with England during the reign of James, both during the Regency of the Earl of Huntly and when James came of age. Border skirmishes and outright wars breaking out were common. Finally in 1543 the Scottish forces won a decisive victory against the English at the Battle of Solway Moss. Afterwards a peace was enacted between James and his young cousin, King Henry IX, of England. The borders that were negotiated remain the borders between the two British kingdoms until this day. (Yep, Mary I Tudor is instead male and succeeds his father sooner.)

    The final battle between England and Scotland was noteworthy in that England was securely Catholic with King Henry IX continuing his father's role as "Defender of the Faith," that is the Catholic Faith, while Scotland was more and more becoming Presbyterian and James himself 'reformed' in 1542 becoming Presbyterian. Quickly after that the entire country converted. James identified with the Highlander Presbyterians over the lowland Catholics. The battle was an attempt by England to force Scotland to at least remain Catholic in the lowlands. Many of those lowlander Catholics fled to England after the victory of Solway Moss and the realization that Scotland was not going to give up the Reformation.

    James died in his sleep at the age of 65 after complaining of headaches the night before He was survived by his wife, his children, and a country secure in its Independence, its Presbtyerianism, and its Gaelic heritage.

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    Alexander IV

    [2] James would be succeeded by his second son Alexander, after the death of the Duke of Rothesay one year earlier. Rothesay and his wife, Barbara of Hesse, would only have three daughters before James's death: Anna, Mary, and Jean. Many feared war would break out over the princesses rights to the succession, particularly given the unpopularity of Alexander and his wife, the young Catherine Vasa.

    Catherine was an almost fanatic devotee to Lutheranism and attempted to convert the Scottish court to the faith. Many reformers saw the faith as too Catholic in its traditions and saw Catherine as ruining all their hard work. However, the Queen was popular among the Catholic south, who saw Lutheranism as more tolerable. Alexander himself had the opposite problem, being accused of "having only one concern: his own enrichment". His ascension was bemoaned by the nobility, who believed his nature was antithetical to Kingship. The King's constant covert meetings with ambassadors "taking bribes and other such things".

    The birth of a daughter, called Catherine for her mother, became the last straw. There were rumors that King Alexander planned on selling his young nieces to the highest bidders, which was met with revulsion due to their ages, given the eldest only recently turning 7 at the time. These rumors caught the ears of Robert McDonald, a young courtier of the Dowager Duchess of Rothesay. Fearing for his beloved mistress and her daughters, he took up vigilante justice. While the King was out riding with one of his many foreign friends, looking for new streams of private revenue, stopped at Cadzow Castle. McDonald covertly followed him in and, when the King went off alone for some heir, stabbed the King, reportedly screaming "Die you bastard". The news of McDonald's actions shocked the court, not least his former mistress, who called it "a ghastly thing". The short reign of King Alexander IV would be followed by that of his uncle, Charles.

    upload_2019-9-3_20-5-31.jpeg
    Charles when he converted

    [3] If his older brother was his father's son, raised to be a True Scotsman, by fostering him to the north, Charles was his mother's son, sharing the same name as his more illustrious cousin, Charles V, the Holy Roman Emperor, the House of Hapsburg, and as Charles I was the King of Spain. Charles did not spend time in the Highlands or among the north. When most of Scotland became Presbyterian, including his brother the king, Charles remained Catholic. However, after the Battle of Solway Moss and the clear reality that from this point on Scotland and Presbyterianism were from now on one and the same, Charles had three options. He could, like so many of his wife's relatives from the south, decamp to England, or perhaps to the Continent and the court of his cousin. He coud remain in Scotland and convert to remain a part of the Court and a True Scotsman. Finally he could choose to reject the new conditions of the kingdom, unite the southern aristocracy who were Catholic, and go to war with his brother.

    Charles became Presbyterian. Like many of the other southern nobility, Charle's converion was not a deep one, but his children were still young as he'd married late in life in his early 30s, the oldest, _______________, was only ten at this point. They were raised in the new Presbyterian faith and they were sincere by adulthood.

    By the time of his nephew's assassination, Charles was 61, had been officially Presbyterian for over two decades, and had children and grandchildren all in this faith.

    Some of the still leaning towards Catholicism in their hearts among the souther nobility, hoped that Charles would on taking the throne avenge the death of his nephew, and perhaps take up the 'compromise' of becoming Lutheran- that is Protestant in Theology but Catholic in style, especially Bishops instead of elected councils of Elders (Presbyters) governing the church, a parallel to Parliament having shared governing responsibiity with the monarch.

    But Charles knew that would lead to civil war and eventually intervention by Catholic England, which would easily destroy Scotland's independence if they had allies.

    So Charles remained Presbyterian, demanded that Queen Catherine convert and raise Princesess Catherine within the Covenant, and did not include the Dowager Duchess nor her daughters in the arrests that eventually led to the trial and execution of McDonald for regicide.

    Charles unified Scotland after the fears of civil war and then turned its attention to overseas. He found common cause with France, despite their religious differences, in that both were threatened by the alliance between Catholic England and the Catholic Hapsburgs. This gave Scotland the breathing room to explore trade with the Indies of the Far East and the Indies of the Carribean. He also hired Jacques Cartier to explore North America for Scotland and conceived of a Scottish Colony somewhere in North America, which didn't happen until after he'd died and his heir, his ______________, _____________ succeeded him.

    Charles died at the ripe age of 77, still a robust man, when he was riding his horse and it tripped. He fell and broke his leg. While recovering it became infected and he did from the infection.
     
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  13. TheNerd_ Noobie History Entusiast

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    What if The Taiping Rebellion succeded?

    Heavenly Emperors of Zogghuo:

    Xiquan 1851 - 1874
    Tianguifui 1874 - 1912
    Qiangjie 1912-1946
    Shangjun 1953-1966


    Xiuquan (House of Hong) 1851 - 1874 [1]

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    Hong Xiuquan
    [1] A aspiring administrator to the Qing Dynasty as a young man, Hong failed the examinations three times. After his third time, however, Hong had a nervous breakdown and as he was in the midst of his breakdown he reportedly went to Heaven and learned of his supposed relation to Christ. When he supposedly recovered he founded a Christian secret society and began to plot to take over the Qing Empire and spread the word of Christ throughout. This began in 1851 as his followers rose up across Southern China starting what's known in China as the Heavenly Liberation War. The revolt was at first treated as an afterthought by the Qing authorities and only after much of South and South-Eastern China fell to the revolters did Qing armies start to seriously fight the rebellion. This led to some decisive defeats in southern China around Guangdong and Hong realized that his followers, despite their zealousness, couldn't stand up to the Qing armies so he turned to the West. He sent dozens of telegrams to as far away as Great Britain calling on them to help save Christianity in China from extinction. The West finally agreed but only if Hong agreed to give them large concessions which Hong, increasingly backed into a corner, was forced to accept. Soon after Royal Navy ships appeared off the coast of China, Russian troops began to be ferried to the Manchurian border in large numbers and French troops in Indochina began to cross into Chinese territory. The expanded war would go on for ten more years as Hong, now with his army reforming under Western doctrines and with western weapons, slowly inched their way across China. Finally, in 1865 as America was finishing up their Civil War Hong led the Great Heavenly Army, his main force, in a concentrated push towards the capital. The fight was hard but with Royal Navy support and by keeping close to the coast to keep within Western supply the advance moved inexorably towards Beijing and as the outskirts of the city fell to Heavenly armies the last Qing Emperor, the Xianfeng Emperor, committed suicide. Soon after the Empress was forced to flee China and Hong assumed control of all of China.

    Before he could even sit on his throne however the West was already calling in their end of the bargain and began demanding large concessions. Hong concerned they would just depose him if he refused, gave Hainan to France, Taiwan to the UK and Shangdong to Russia. This led to an outcry in China but Emperor Hong, styling himself the Heavenly Emperor quickly squashed dissent using his fanatic Tiāntáng Wèiduì (Heavenly Guard) to suppress the budding rebellions in Beijing and across China. Hong, in an attempt to unify the populace behind him, declared the foundation of the Christian Church of China which fused Confucian teachings and Christian dogma to varying degrees of success. His followers from the rebellion readily accepted the Church but the rest of China were more hesitant with Confucianism remaining a strong minority, only just under the Church. Hong also spread the reforms implemented during the rebellion to the rest of China, reforming the ancient bureaucracy that denied him so many times, changed the calendar and banned polygamy. These two had limited effect outside the cities that were hubs of revolutionary fervor. With China seemingly stabilized Hong turned his eyes to the fringes of China which had taken advantage of the chaos to free itself. Hong sent agitators into Tibet and Xinjiang to cause chaos and make any future invasion easier. However anticlimactically, just as the invasions reached the planning stages Hong was shot and killed by an assassin. He was succeeded by Tiaguifu, his son and heir apparent.

    Tiaguifu 1874 - 1912 [2]


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    A photo of the heavenly king at age 14

    Hong Tiaguifu, also known as Hong Futian or Hong Tiangui by some of the Manchu's records, was the second King of the Heavenly Kingdom. A pious young man, the king was full of zealotry and was ready to preach the word of God to every corner of China. He was regarded as a scholar from a young age and was not a particularly brilliant military commander and in fact was bad at horse riding, at the time wrongly considered an essential skill for a commander, and especially a leader. But even with his lack of military prowess, he wished to build railroads to connect the country. He endorsed many of his uncle, Ex-Prince Gan Rengan military and especially administrative reforms, which encouraged the centralization of the Kingdom. His first years of reign were spent in the establishment of a new order in the Nanjing court in a power struggle with his brother Tianguang "The Guang-King", where he came out on top. Frustrated with his losing battle, Tianguang would self-exile himself to Xinjiang, where, with a group of Loyalists, he would conquer the region, and by right of conquest, become sultan of East Turkestan, plotting during the next decade, waiting for the chance to strike.

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    Painting of the Beijing line later built in the waning years of the king
    Meanwhile, the King crushed rebellions all over the country and constructed the first train, the Nanjing-Shanghai line, in 1879 and would build more under his 28 year-long reign. He used railroads to spread the God-worshipping faith and convert millions, sometimes en masse. He would build churches and convert old Buddhist and Taoist monasteries. And last but not least, he would deal with rebellions in the rump state of Xinjiang in 1891. A brief campaign was overseen by Officer Li Rongfa, passing by Jiuquan and attacking Hami, Turpan and Luntai [called by the locals "Ürümqi"]. The Siege of Luntai lasted 10 days, as it was starved out by the Heavenly Army. At last in 1893, Xinjiang would be pacified. The Guang-King would be executed, but his 4-year-old son and his wife would escape, disappearing for some time. Tibet would fall shortly after, not only thanks to the efforts of the previous monarch but also due to expeditions launched by the British during the Great Game. Even if by 1906, direct rule was restored thanks to the Treaty of Lhasa, control of the region was still tenuous.


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    Uygurs being POWs being enslaved.

    But under Taiping rule, the Muslim Uygurs especially would suffer immense brutality, and centuries-old literary traditions would die, In the fire of the fanatical Hong. Many books were burned under the Great Hong Preaching, and it remains a stain on the long history of the Hong, and unfortunately, a footnote in China. This would cause collective cultural trauma, and would not be the last time that the heavenly kings would deal with this unstable and volatile region.

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    The King ordered the killing of Uygur scholars

    Tiangufui spent his last years in deep meditation, living in the reclusion in monasteries built during his rule. After a life of War crimes, zealotry, fanaticism, and some progress, King Tiandguifu would die in 1912 and would be succeeded by his nephew, Hong Qiangjie
    The next and last of the Heavenly Emperors of China, Qiangjie, was the nephew of Hong Tianguifui through his sister Hong Xiuying. After the death of Tianguifui’s only son in 1882, Qiangjie, through a complicated web of lies and appeasement, would be appointed crown prince.
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    Qiangjie became king of The Heavenly Kingdom of Zhongguo in 1912 when his uncle allegedly died of natural causes (although some said he was poisoned by his sister). The cruelest king of Zhongguo, he was also the last.
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    Above:Chinese soldiers preparing for an attack on the German-held port of Tsingtao in 1914
    In 1914, war broke out when the Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand was assassinated by a Serb nationalist. Fearing isolation from the west, Qiangjie chose to side with the Entente. The brutality of the war and the instability it caused in China caused several rebellions, which led to Zhongguo dropping out of the war.
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    Tögs- Ochiryen Namnansüren, leader of the Second Mongol Khanate
    In Mongolia, several high-ranking princes and leaders rebelled against the King, in favor of reestablishing a Mongol Buddhist monarchy. Similar events occurred in Turkestan and Manchuria.
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    Chen Duxiu of the Socialist Republic of China
    But by far the biggest threat to the Monarchy was the socialists, who formed a coalition with Sun- Yat Sen’s Republicans, and received aid from Bolshevik leaders in Siberia. On December 13, 1940, they declared war on the Kingdom, and six years later, seized Peking. King Qiangjie would die in exile in 1953. His son, Shangjun, succeeded him as a pretender to the throne.

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    King Shangjun reigned 1953 to 1966, was one of the more controversial figures in Chinese History. Born in 1918, he would start his reign at the high point of the Civil War between the Communist and Republicans, which, after rising tensions and increasingly incompatible positions, would plunge the country in flames. While most provinces rebelled, many seceded, like Mongolia, Turkestan, and Manchuria. One of these was the island of Taiwan, which would declare independence in 1952. At this point, the Warsaw pact was funding the reds, under Mao Zedong, more radical and dictatorial than his predecessor Duxiu, and NATO funded the authoritarian republicans under Chen Kai-Shek. In the Caos, Shangjun, militarily competent and charismatic, was able to occupy Taiwan, squandering the last funds he had. He was planning to attack and liberate the whole of China but ended up dying in 1966.

    He is known for how he conducted himself in the Taiwanese campaign, first spending a year to conquer and pacify the western plateau and then spending two years deep in the mountainous east. His first order of business was to proselyte in the island, encouraging fleeing priests, which were butchered by Mao's red guards and welcomed Han and Haka Christian refugees used to displace the local Buddhist and Taoist population. He would then convert the already overwhelmingly Christian Gaoshan people, using them in positions of power in the court. He would enforce the usage of the dying Hakka language, already the language of education and politics in the Old Zogghuo. Over the decade, Shangjun managed to stabilize, even a little bit the state. But life wasn't all sunshine and roses.

    He violently repressed the native culture and language, and would easily resort to blackmailing if citizens didn't fit in line with the image the state wanted to promote, those of a Hakka-speaking Han and Christian nation-state. Closet Taoists were tortured and killed, many escaping. He also nearly created one of the most prominent Chinese saints, Hong Xiquan, known as Saint Renkun The Great.

    Although he had a short reign, he was able to stand as an example, a model, to follow for future theocracies, strangely in Islam where Ayatollah Khomeini and Saddam Hussein were inspired by his practices, even if they considered him an infidel. He would inspire revolutions in Christian Nations such as East Timor, which shake off its chains in 1975, and in Georgia, which would go through many anti-communist uprisings before 1989, which restored its monarchy under Jorge XIV de Bagration y de Mukhrani in 1989.​

    He would die in 1966 and be succeeded by ____________.
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2019
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  14. Asharella Socialistic Vmpr Bi Witch Girl

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    I can't continue this until someone else posts on it. I'd hate to see it wither and die.

    Is anyone interested?
     
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  15. Shiva Dreaming... always dreaming...

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    What if James IV of Scotland (House of Stewart) had married Maria of Aragon instead of Margaret Tudor of England, daugher and sister to kings. Thus the crowns of Scotland and England would not eventually unite, nor Scotland and England eventually become the United Kingdom?

    1488 - 1513: James IV (House of Stewart)
    1513 - 1566: James V (House of Stewart) [1]
    1566 - 1568: Alexander IV (House of Stewart) [2]
    1568 - 1584: Charles Stewart [3]

    1584 - 1621:
    Matthew I (House of Stewart) [4]


    [​IMG]
    James V

    [1]
    In the year 1500, King James IV of Scotland, House of Stewart, married the Infanta Maria of Aragon, daughter of King Ferdinand of Aragon and Queen Isabella of Castile. She was 18 and he was 27. Therir firstborn, named after his father, was born in 1501. He was partially raised in the Higlands by Alexander Gordon, 3rd Earl of Huntly, and Sherrif of Inverness, which he was made in 1500. Gordon was the righthand man of the King in securing the north and west and he was trusted with helping raise the Prince. James IV wanted to insure that his son was not seen as Spanish, but as a true Scotsman, and thus the sending him to Inerness every summer from the age of four until his majority. When the King died in 1513 in battle with England, Gordon became co-Regent with Queen Maria, and sole regent when shortly after that she married Manuel of Portugual.

    James V, House of Stewart, always considered himself a Highlander and was beloved by the clans. In 1519 he ended the regency and married Gordon's granddaughter, Jean Campbell, keeping Gordon as an advisor until the older man's death five years later.

    Scotland was constantly at war with England during the reign of James, both during the Regency of the Earl of Huntly and when James came of age. Border skirmishes and outright wars breaking out were common. Finally in 1543 the Scottish forces won a decisive victory against the English at the Battle of Solway Moss. Afterwards a peace was enacted between James and his young cousin, King Henry IX, of England. The borders that were negotiated remain the borders between the two British kingdoms until this day. (Yep, Mary I Tudor is instead male and succeeds his father sooner.)

    The final battle between England and Scotland was noteworthy in that England was securely Catholic with King Henry IX continuing his father's role as "Defender of the Faith," that is the Catholic Faith, while Scotland was more and more becoming Presbyterian and James himself 'reformed' in 1542 becoming Presbyterian. Quickly after that the entire country converted. James identified with the Highlander Presbyterians over the lowland Catholics. The battle was an attempt by England to force Scotland to at least remain Catholic in the lowlands. Many of those lowlander Catholics fled to England after the victory of Solway Moss and the realization that Scotland was not going to give up the Reformation.

    James died in his sleep at the age of 65 after complaining of headaches the night before He was survived by his wife, his children, and a country secure in its Independence, its Presbtyerianism, and its Gaelic heritage.

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    Alexander IV

    [2] James would be succeeded by his second son Alexander, after the death of the Duke of Rothesay one year earlier. Rothesay and his wife, Barbara of Hesse, would only have three daughters before James's death: Anna, Mary, and Jean. Many feared war would break out over the princesses rights to the succession, particularly given the unpopularity of Alexander and his wife, the young Catherine Vasa.

    Catherine was an almost fanatic devotee to Lutheranism and attempted to convert the Scottish court to the faith. Many reformers saw the faith as too Catholic in its traditions and saw Catherine as ruining all their hard work. However, the Queen was popular among the Catholic south, who saw Lutheranism as more tolerable. Alexander himself had the opposite problem, being accused of "having only one concern: his own enrichment". His ascension was bemoaned by the nobility, who believed his nature was antithetical to Kingship. The King's constant covert meetings with ambassadors "taking bribes and other such things".

    The birth of a daughter, called Catherine for her mother, became the last straw. There were rumors that King Alexander planned on selling his young nieces to the highest bidders, which was met with revulsion due to their ages, given the eldest only recently turning 7 at the time. These rumors caught the ears of Robert McDonald, a young courtier of the Dowager Duchess of Rothesay. Fearing for his beloved mistress and her daughters, he took up vigilante justice. While the King was out riding with one of his many foreign friends, looking for new streams of private revenue, stopped at Cadzow Castle. McDonald covertly followed him in and, when the King went off alone for some heir, stabbed the King, reportedly screaming "Die you bastard". The news of McDonald's actions shocked the court, not least his former mistress, who called it "a ghastly thing". The short reign of King Alexander IV would be followed by that of his uncle, Charles.

    View attachment 485387
    Charles when he converted

    [3] If his older brother was his father's son, raised to be a True Scotsman, by fostering him to the north, Charles was his mother's son, sharing the same name as his more illustrious cousin, Charles V, the Holy Roman Emperor, the House of Hapsburg, and as Charles I was the King of Spain. Charles did not spend time in the Highlands or among the north. When most of Scotland became Presbyterian, including his brother the king, Charles remained Catholic. However, after the Battle of Solway Moss and the clear reality that from this point on Scotland and Presbyterianism were from now on one and the same, Charles had three options. He could, like so many of his wife's relatives from the south, decamp to England, or perhaps to the Continent and the court of his cousin. He coud remain in Scotland and convert to remain a part of the Court and a True Scotsman. Finally he could choose to reject the new conditions of the kingdom, unite the southern aristocracy who were Catholic, and go to war with his brother.

    Charles became Presbyterian. Like many of the other southern nobility, Charle's converion was not a deep one, but his children were still young as he'd married late in life in his early 30s, the oldest, Prince Henry, Duke of Albany, was only ten at this point. They were raised in the new Presbyterian faith and they were sincere by adulthood.

    By the time of his nephew's assassination, Charles was 61, had been officially Presbyterian for over two decades, and had children and grandchildren all in this faith.

    Some of the still leaning towards Catholicism in their hearts among the souther nobility, hoped that Charles would on taking the throne avenge the death of his nephew, and perhaps take up the 'compromise' of becoming Lutheran- that is Protestant in Theology but Catholic in style, especially Bishops instead of elected councils of Elders (Presbyters) governing the church, a parallel to Parliament having shared governing responsibiity with the monarch.

    But Charles knew that would lead to civil war and eventually intervention by Catholic England, which would easily destroy Scotland's independence if they had allies.

    So Charles remained Presbyterian, demanded that Queen Catherine convert and raise Princesess Catherine within the Covenant, and did not include the Dowager Duchess nor her daughters in the arrests that eventually led to the trial and execution of McDonald for regicide.

    Charles unified Scotland after the fears of civil war and then turned its attention to overseas. He found common cause with France, despite their religious differences, in that both were threatened by the alliance between Catholic England and the Catholic Hapsburgs. This gave Scotland the breathing room to explore trade with the Indies of the Far East and the Indies of the Carribean. He also hired Jacques Cartier to explore North America for Scotland and conceived of a Scottish Colony somewhere in North America, which didn't happen until after he'd died and his heir, his grandson, Prince Matthew, Duke of Albany succeeded him.

    Charles died at the ripe age of 77, still a robust man, when he was riding his horse and it tripped. He fell and broke his leg. While recovering it became infected and he did from the infection.

    [​IMG]
    Matthew I in his old age.
    [4] Matthew I was born the second son of Prince Henry, Duke of Albany and his wife, Princess Hedwig of Anhalt, being 'the spare' to his brother Prince Charles, Prince Matthew was educated for the possibility of one day wearing the crown, in addition to being tutored in the faith of the Scottish Kirk along side his older brother and their younger siblings.

    As the Prince became older he fell in with the clique of popular young noblemen that flocked around Prince Charles, this group of young men became notorious all throughout Scotland for their epic drinking binges, wild hunting parties, and an ever changing cast of young, beautiful women. The King was dismissive of complaints from the authorities about his grandsons behavior, seeing it as part of their growing up with their peers.

    The death of Charles and Matthew's father, Prince Henry, Duke of Albany in one of the last outbreaks of the Sweating Sickness bumped Matthew up in the succession, and forced the King to consider the marriages of his grandchildren.

    A prestigious continental match was made for Prince Charles, for Matthew his first wife was chosen from the Scottish nobility, Barbara Hamilton, a daughter of the prestigious Hamilton family, with whom he had two children before Barbara died in a miscarriage with what would have been their third child.

    King Charles began to consider a new marriage for his second grandson when another tragedy struck the House of Stewart with the unexpected death of Prince Charles, Duke of Albany when he fell out of a tower window while drunk, crashing onto the ground below.

    Prince Matthew was then made Duke of Albany and the heir to the Scottish throne, and his second marriage was not with a Scottish lady but with a German Princess, Anna Magdalene of Brandenburg with whom Matthew would have three children.

    Prince Matthew's partying ways slowed down considerably after the death of his first wife, and ended by the birth of his third child with Anna Magdalene, it was his second wife who encouraged his maturity, even encouraging regular church attendance, which earned the Prince (and his wife) the love of the ministers in the Church of Scotland.

    The 'long-wait' for the throne ended with the death of King Charles and the rise of King Matthew I to the throne.

    As the continent continued to convulse with the growing number of Protestant churches, internal schisms, and Catholic Reformation, war and violence bloomed like flowers in spring. Scotland being relatively peaceful became a haven for various Calvinist and Presbyterian preachers.

    Problems for Scotland began when members of other groups within Protestantism found their way to Scotland, the various branches of Lutheranism, and more radical groups such as the Anabaptists and Nontrinitarian Christianity, these groups were not officially welcomed into the Kingdom but never the less they did gain small followings, particularly on the borderlands with England, which did allow these groups to slip between the border to preach in England and flee to the 'relative' safety of Scotland.

    This did anger the English authorities, however King Matthew was able to plead ignorance of the matter to King Henry XI of England, who also had to deal with rebellion in Ireland due to England's 'Plantations' in Ireland. Keeping England distracted with internal problems would prove to be King Matthew I's main policy of dealing with the English Kingdom.

    King Matthew I also served as a patron of literature and the arts in Scotland, seeing the rise of the 'Scottish Renaissance' that would outlast Matthew's reign, in addition to this King Matthew established a number of schools and two universities to promote education amongst the nobility and merchant classes.

    The King also considered a colonial project in the New World, however the costs at the time were seen as too high and Scotland's low population meant that there were a lack of volunteers to risk it all in a strange new land.

    However when Queen Anna Magdalene died at age 53 in 1619, it broke the King's heart, the remaining few years of his reign were spent in a gloomy court in perpetual mourning until King Matthew I was found to have passed in his sleep at age 58 in 1621, passing the crown to his ____, ______.
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2019
  16. Asharella Socialistic Vmpr Bi Witch Girl

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2009
    Location:
    Ecotopia ~ NW Washington State
    What if James IV of Scotland (House of Stewart) had married Maria of Aragon instead of Margaret Tudor of England, daugher and sister to kings. Thus the crowns of Scotland and England would not eventually unite, nor Scotland and England eventually become the United Kingdom?

    1488 - 1513: James IV (House of Stewart)
    1513 - 1566: James V (House of Stewart) [1]
    1566 - 1568: Alexander IV (House of Stewart) [2]
    1568 - 1584: Charles Stewart [3]

    1584 - 1621:
    Matthew I (House of Stewart) [4]
    1621 - 1690: Duncan III (House of Stewart) [5]


    [​IMG]
    James V


    [1]
    In the year 1500, King James IV of Scotland, House of Stewart, married the Infanta Maria of Aragon, daughter of King Ferdinand of Aragon and Queen Isabella of Castile. She was 18 and he was 27. Therir firstborn, named after his father, was born in 1501. He was partially raised in the Higlands by Alexander Gordon, 3rd Earl of Huntly, and Sherrif of Inverness, which he was made in 1500. Gordon was the righthand man of the King in securing the north and west and he was trusted with helping raise the Prince. James IV wanted to insure that his son was not seen as Spanish, but as a true Scotsman, and thus the sending him to Inerness every summer from the age of four until his majority. When the King died in 1513 in battle with England, Gordon became co-Regent with Queen Maria, and sole regent when shortly after that she married Manuel of Portugual.

    James V, House of Stewart, always considered himself a Highlander and was beloved by the clans. In 1519 he ended the regency and married Gordon's granddaughter, Jean Campbell, keeping Gordon as an advisor until the older man's death five years later.

    Scotland was constantly at war with England during the reign of James, both during the Regency of the Earl of Huntly and when James came of age. Border skirmishes and outright wars breaking out were common. Finally in 1543 the Scottish forces won a decisive victory against the English at the Battle of Solway Moss. Afterwards a peace was enacted between James and his young cousin, King Henry IX, of England. The borders that were negotiated remain the borders between the two British kingdoms until this day. (Yep, Mary I Tudor is instead male and succeeds his father sooner.)

    The final battle between England and Scotland was noteworthy in that England was securely Catholic with King Henry IX continuing his father's role as "Defender of the Faith," that is the Catholic Faith, while Scotland was more and more becoming Presbyterian and James himself 'reformed' in 1542 becoming Presbyterian. Quickly after that the entire country converted. James identified with the Highlander Presbyterians over the lowland Catholics. The battle was an attempt by England to force Scotland to at least remain Catholic in the lowlands. Many of those lowlander Catholics fled to England after the victory of Solway Moss and the realization that Scotland was not going to give up the Reformation.

    James died in his sleep at the age of 65 after complaining of headaches the night before He was survived by his wife, his children, and a country secure in its Independence, its Presbtyerianism, and its Gaelic heritage.

    [​IMG]
    Alexander IV

    [2] James would be succeeded by his second son Alexander, after the death of the Duke of Rothesay one year earlier. Rothesay and his wife, Barbara of Hesse, would only have three daughters before James's death: Anna, Mary, and Jean. Many feared war would break out over the princesses rights to the succession, particularly given the unpopularity of Alexander and his wife, the young Catherine Vasa.

    Catherine was an almost fanatic devotee to Lutheranism and attempted to convert the Scottish court to the faith. Many reformers saw the faith as too Catholic in its traditions and saw Catherine as ruining all their hard work. However, the Queen was popular among the Catholic south, who saw Lutheranism as more tolerable. Alexander himself had the opposite problem, being accused of "having only one concern: his own enrichment". His ascension was bemoaned by the nobility, who believed his nature was antithetical to Kingship. The King's constant covert meetings with ambassadors "taking bribes and other such things".

    The birth of a daughter, called Catherine for her mother, became the last straw. There were rumors that King Alexander planned on selling his young nieces to the highest bidders, which was met with revulsion due to their ages, given the eldest only recently turning 7 at the time. These rumors caught the ears of Robert McDonald, a young courtier of the Dowager Duchess of Rothesay. Fearing for his beloved mistress and her daughters, he took up vigilante justice. While the King was out riding with one of his many foreign friends, looking for new streams of private revenue, stopped at Cadzow Castle. McDonald covertly followed him in and, when the King went off alone for some heir, stabbed the King, reportedly screaming "Die you bastard". The news of McDonald's actions shocked the court, not least his former mistress, who called it "a ghastly thing". The short reign of King Alexander IV would be followed by that of his uncle, Charles.

    [​IMG]
    Charles when he converted

    [3] If his older brother was his father's son, raised to be a True Scotsman, by fostering him to the north, Charles was his mother's son, sharing the same name as his more illustrious cousin, Charles V, the Holy Roman Emperor, the House of Hapsburg, and as Charles I was the King of Spain. Charles did not spend time in the Highlands or among the north. When most of Scotland became Presbyterian, including his brother the king, Charles remained Catholic. However, after the Battle of Solway Moss and the clear reality that from this point on Scotland and Presbyterianism were from now on one and the same, Charles had three options. He could, like so many of his wife's relatives from the south, decamp to England, or perhaps to the Continent and the court of his cousin. He coud remain in Scotland and convert to remain a part of the Court and a True Scotsman. Finally he could choose to reject the new conditions of the kingdom, unite the southern aristocracy who were Catholic, and go to war with his brother.

    Charles became Presbyterian. Like many of the other southern nobility, Charle's converion was not a deep one, but his children were still young as he'd married late in life in his early 30s, the oldest, Prince Henry, Duke of Albany, was only ten at this point. They were raised in the new Presbyterian faith and they were sincere by adulthood.

    By the time of his nephew's assassination, Charles was 61, had been officially Presbyterian for over two decades, and had children and grandchildren all in this faith.

    Some of the still leaning towards Catholicism in their hearts among the souther nobility, hoped that Charles would on taking the throne avenge the death of his nephew, and perhaps take up the 'compromise' of becoming Lutheran- that is Protestant in Theology but Catholic in style, especially Bishops instead of elected councils of Elders (Presbyters) governing the church, a parallel to Parliament having shared governing responsibiity with the monarch.

    But Charles knew that would lead to civil war and eventually intervention by Catholic England, which would easily destroy Scotland's independence if they had allies.

    So Charles remained Presbyterian, demanded that Queen Catherine convert and raise Princesess Catherine within the Covenant, and did not include the Dowager Duchess nor her daughters in the arrests that eventually led to the trial and execution of McDonald for regicide.

    Charles unified Scotland after the fears of civil war and then turned its attention to overseas. He found common cause with France, despite their religious differences, in that both were threatened by the alliance between Catholic England and the Catholic Hapsburgs. This gave Scotland the breathing room to explore trade with the Indies of the Far East and the Indies of the Carribean. He also hired Jacques Cartier to explore North America for Scotland and conceived of a Scottish Colony somewhere in North America, which didn't happen until after he'd died and his heir, his grandson, Prince Matthew, Duke of Albany succeeded him.

    Charles died at the ripe age of 77, still a robust man, when he was riding his horse and it tripped. He fell and broke his leg. While recovering it became infected and he did from the infection.

    [​IMG]
    Matthew I in his old age.


    [4]
    Matthew I was born the second son of Prince Henry, Duke of Albany and his wife, Princess Hedwig of Anhalt, being 'the spare' to his brother Prince Charles, Prince Matthew was educated for the possibility of one day wearing the crown, in addition to being tutored in the faith of the Scottish Kirk along side his older brother and their younger siblings.

    As the Prince became older he fell in with the clique of popular young noblemen that flocked around Prince Charles, this group of young men became notorious all throughout Scotland for their epic drinking binges, wild hunting parties, and an ever changing cast of young, beautiful women. The King was dismissive of complaints from the authorities about his grandsons behavior, seeing it as part of their growing up with their peers.

    The death of Charles and Matthew's father, Prince Henry, Duke of Albany in one of the last outbreaks of the Sweating Sickness bumped Matthew up in the succession, and forced the King to consider the marriages of his grandchildren.

    A prestigious continental match was made for Prince Charles, for Matthew his first wife was chosen from the Scottish nobility, Barbara Hamilton, a daughter of the prestigious Hamilton family, with whom he had two children before Barbara died in a miscarriage with what would have been their third child.

    King Charles began to consider a new marriage for his second grandson when another tragedy struck the House of Stewart with the unexpected death of Prince Charles, Duke of Albany when he fell out of a tower window while drunk, crashing onto the ground below.

    Prince Matthew was then made Duke of Albany and the heir to the Scottish throne, and his second marriage was not with a Scottish lady but with a German Princess, Anna Magdalene of Brandenburg with whom Matthew would have three children.

    Prince Matthew's partying ways slowed down considerably after the death of his first wife, and ended by the birth of his third child with Anna Magdalene, it was his second wife who encouraged his maturity, even encouraging regular church attendance, which earned the Prince (and his wife) the love of the ministers in the Church of Scotland.

    The 'long-wait' for the throne ended with the death of King Charles and the rise of King Matthew I to the throne.

    As the continent continued to convulse with the growing number of Protestant churches, internal schisms, Catholic Reformation, war and violence bloomed like flowers in spring. Scotland being relatively peaceful became a haven for various Calvinist and Presbyterian preachers.

    Problems for Scotland began when members of other groups within Protestantism found their way to Scotland, the various branches of Lutheranism, and more radical groups such as the Anabaptists and Nontrinitarian Christianity, these groups were not officially welcomed into the Kingdom but never the less they did gain small followings, particularly on the borderlands with England, which did allow these groups to slip between the border to preach in England and flee to the 'relative' safety of Scotland.

    This did anger the English authorities, however King Matthew was able to plead ignorance of the matter to King Henry XI of England, who also had to deal with rebellion in Ireland due to England's 'Plantations' in Ireland. Keeping England distracted with internal problems would prove to be King Matthew I's main policy of dealing with the English Kingdom.

    King Matthew I also served as a patron of literature and the arts in Scotland, seeing the rise of the 'Scottish Renaissance' that would outlast Matthew's reign, in addition to this King Matthew established a number of schools and two universities to promote education amongst the nobility and merchant classes.

    The King also considered a colonial project in the New World, however the costs at the time were seen as too high and Scotland's low population meant that there were a lack of volunteers to risk it all in a strange new land.

    However when Queen Anna Magdalene died at age 53 in 1619, it broke the King's heart, the remaining few years of his reign were spent in a gloomy court in perpetual mourning until King Matthew I was found to have passed in his sleep at age 58 in 1621, passing the crown to his son, James.


    [​IMG]
    Duncan III

    [5] Duncan Charles Stewart was born May 29, 1588, the eight child of then Prince Matthew, the sixth with his second wife, Anna Magdalene, and his third son and second son to survive to adulthood. He was 32 when he took the throne, a vibrant man and soldier, who'd fought in the wars of Religion on the Continent, alongside his mother's relatives, fighting for the Protestants of Brandenburg against the Holy Roman Empire and Poland. (OOC: the War known as the Thirty Years War in OTL is the Forty Years War in TTL, starting in 1609 instead of 1618. /OOC) His older brother, Prince Robert James Stewart died in 1620 only months before his father, and Prince Duncan was quickly made Duke of Albany and recalled from the wars on the Continent.

    Prince Robert was Duncan's senior by 7 years, the child that had led to their father settling down into a devout life. Robert had continued in that vein, becoming a devout man of art, literature, and science. He married his mother's cousin's daughter, Katrina of Brandenburg and had many children, but only daughters who survived past infancy. Robert never was a robust man, he was a thin, frail man, who started balding in his early twenties and often would be bedridden for a week or more with an illness. Finally one of those illnesses took him when he was not yet 40 years old.

    Prince Duncan, on the other hand, was a robust man, who as a child had loved the hunt, the Highlands, where the family had kept the Inverness Castle as a second home in the north, and revered his ancestors, Charles I and James V. Against his father's wishes, he'd gone to the continent to soldier as soon as the Wars of Religion began in the Forty Years War in 1609. There the little bit of German he'd learned from his mother became a second tongue for him. He was reknown for his courage and prowess in battle.

    It was a blow to him to have to return to Scotland while the war raged on. He not only grieved his older brother, whom he loved dearly, but also having to cease to be a soldier. He'd never married or even courted a woman. Now a friendship over the death of Robert led him and Katrina to become quite close. After the death of King Matthew, it was clear the wisest thing for Dunan was to marry the Princess. They did marry in 1622 and he became the stepfather of his nieces. However, he and Katrina were never able to conceive a child. It was clear they loved each other and neither one was ever unfaithful.

    Duncan remained robust throughout his life, an outdoors king. His long life amazed his contemporaries, living to the age of 102, being on the throne for yearly 70 years. By then his Queen, Katrina, and step daughters had all died, even some of his step-grandchildren who'd survived childhood had also died. It was said Duncan at age 100 resembled another man in his 80s; he still had all his mental facilities, all his teeth, a full head of hair, good eye sight and hearing, and stood strong and tall. He only declined in his last year of life.

    Duncan pursued colonies in North America, estabishing New Albion in the lands south of the St. Lawrence River Gulf (New Brunswich and Nova Scotia in OTL). He also established a colony in the East Indies in Timor, with the Dutch taking the rest.

    Scotland remained a devout land steeped in Presbyterianism, but this faith was one very open to the developing Science and drew men of learning in the new leaning from all over Europe to Scotland, where a Royal Academy was developed by Duncan and the Universities of Edinburgh and of Glasgow became among the most prestigious centers of learning in the world.

    Even though it was expected when the King's health began to turn as he entered his second century, it was still difficult for the kingdom to lose their long reigning king. He was suceeded by his ________________, ___________.
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2019
  17. Asharella Socialistic Vmpr Bi Witch Girl

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2009
    Location:
    Ecotopia ~ NW Washington State
    I admit. I did this line so I could have Duncan of Highlander be King Duncan III. I'm not embarassed by that one bit! :D
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2019
    99lives, Jonathan and Shiva like this.
  18. Hindustani Person Ambiguously Brown

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2017
    Location:
    Unspecific Autonomous Region of Nowheristan
    I claim the next Hong!
     
  19. Jonathan Corbynite with fire in heart & food in belly

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2013
    Location:
    Kent, England, United Kingdom
    I claim the next Scotland
     
    Asharella likes this.
  20. Jonathan Corbynite with fire in heart & food in belly

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2013
    Location:
    Kent, England, United Kingdom
    What if James IV of Scotland (House of Stewart) had married Maria of Aragon instead of Margaret Tudor of England, daugher and sister to kings. Thus the crowns of Scotland and England would not eventually unite, nor Scotland and England eventually become the United Kingdom?

    1488 - 1513: James IV (House of Stewart)
    1513 - 1566: James V (House of Stewart) [1]
    1566 - 1568: Alexander IV (House of Stewart) [2]
    1568 - 1584: Charles I (House of Stewart) [3]

    1584 - 1621:
    Matthew I (House of Stewart) [4]
    1621 - 1690: Duncan III (House of Stewart) [5]
    1690 - 1753: Alexander V (House of Graham) [6]


    [​IMG]
    James V
    [1] In the year 1500, King James IV of Scotland, House of Stewart, married the Infanta Maria of Aragon, daughter of King Ferdinand of Aragon and Queen Isabella of Castile. She was 18 and he was 27. Therir firstborn, named after his father, was born in 1501. He was partially raised in the Higlands by Alexander Gordon, 3rd Earl of Huntly, and Sherrif of Inverness, which he was made in 1500. Gordon was the righthand man of the King in securing the north and west and he was trusted with helping raise the Prince. James IV wanted to insure that his son was not seen as Spanish, but as a true Scotsman, and thus the sending him to Inerness every summer from the age of four until his majority. When the King died in 1513 in battle with England, Gordon became co-Regent with Queen Maria, and sole regent when shortly after that she married Manuel of Portugual.

    James V, House of Stewart, always considered himself a Highlander and was beloved by the clans. In 1519 he ended the regency and married Gordon's granddaughter, Jean Campbell, keeping Gordon as an advisor until the older man's death five years later.

    Scotland was constantly at war with England during the reign of James, both during the Regency of the Earl of Huntly and when James came of age. Border skirmishes and outright wars breaking out were common. Finally in 1543 the Scottish forces won a decisive victory against the English at the Battle of Solway Moss. Afterwards a peace was enacted between James and his young cousin, King Henry IX, of England. The borders that were negotiated remain the borders between the two British kingdoms until this day. (Yep, Mary I Tudor is instead male and succeeds his father sooner.)

    The final battle between England and Scotland was noteworthy in that England was securely Catholic with King Henry IX continuing his father's role as "Defender of the Faith," that is the Catholic Faith, while Scotland was more and more becoming Presbyterian and James himself 'reformed' in 1542 becoming Presbyterian. Quickly after that the entire country converted. James identified with the Highlander Presbyterians over the lowland Catholics. The battle was an attempt by England to force Scotland to at least remain Catholic in the lowlands. Many of those lowlander Catholics fled to England after the victory of Solway Moss and the realization that Scotland was not going to give up the Reformation.

    James died in his sleep at the age of 65 after complaining of headaches the night before He was survived by his wife, his children, and a country secure in its Independence, its Presbtyerianism, and its Gaelic heritage.

    [​IMG]
    Alexander IV

    [2] James would be succeeded by his second son Alexander, after the death of the Duke of Rothesay one year earlier. Rothesay and his wife, Barbara of Hesse, would only have three daughters before James's death: Anna, Mary, and Jean. Many feared war would break out over the princesses rights to the succession, particularly given the unpopularity of Alexander and his wife, the young Catherine Vasa.

    Catherine was an almost fanatic devotee to Lutheranism and attempted to convert the Scottish court to the faith. Many reformers saw the faith as too Catholic in its traditions and saw Catherine as ruining all their hard work. However, the Queen was popular among the Catholic south, who saw Lutheranism as more tolerable. Alexander himself had the opposite problem, being accused of "having only one concern: his own enrichment". His ascension was bemoaned by the nobility, who believed his nature was antithetical to Kingship. The King's constant covert meetings with ambassadors "taking bribes and other such things".

    The birth of a daughter, called Catherine for her mother, became the last straw. There were rumors that King Alexander planned on selling his young nieces to the highest bidders, which was met with revulsion due to their ages, given the eldest only recently turning 7 at the time. These rumors caught the ears of Robert McDonald, a young courtier of the Dowager Duchess of Rothesay. Fearing for his beloved mistress and her daughters, he took up vigilante justice. While the King was out riding with one of his many foreign friends, looking for new streams of private revenue, stopped at Cadzow Castle. McDonald covertly followed him in and, when the King went off alone for some heir, stabbed the King, reportedly screaming "Die you bastard". The news of McDonald's actions shocked the court, not least his former mistress, who called it "a ghastly thing". The short reign of King Alexander IV would be followed by that of his uncle, Charles.

    [​IMG]
    Charles when he converted

    [3] If his older brother was his father's son, raised to be a True Scotsman, by fostering him to the north, Charles was his mother's son, sharing the same name as his more illustrious cousin, Charles V, the Holy Roman Emperor, the House of Hapsburg, and as Charles I was the King of Spain. Charles did not spend time in the Highlands or among the north. When most of Scotland became Presbyterian, including his brother the king, Charles remained Catholic. However, after the Battle of Solway Moss and the clear reality that from this point on Scotland and Presbyterianism were from now on one and the same, Charles had three options. He could, like so many of his wife's relatives from the south, decamp to England, or perhaps to the Continent and the court of his cousin. He coud remain in Scotland and convert to remain a part of the Court and a True Scotsman. Finally he could choose to reject the new conditions of the kingdom, unite the southern aristocracy who were Catholic, and go to war with his brother.

    Charles became Presbyterian. Like many of the other southern nobility, Charle's converion was not a deep one, but his children were still young as he'd married late in life in his early 30s, the oldest, Prince Henry, Duke of Albany, was only ten at this point. They were raised in the new Presbyterian faith and they were sincere by adulthood.

    By the time of his nephew's assassination, Charles was 61, had been officially Presbyterian for over two decades, and had children and grandchildren all in this faith.

    Some of the still leaning towards Catholicism in their hearts among the souther nobility, hoped that Charles would on taking the throne avenge the death of his nephew, and perhaps take up the 'compromise' of becoming Lutheran- that is Protestant in Theology but Catholic in style, especially Bishops instead of elected councils of Elders (Presbyters) governing the church, a parallel to Parliament having shared governing responsibiity with the monarch.

    But Charles knew that would lead to civil war and eventually intervention by Catholic England, which would easily destroy Scotland's independence if they had allies.

    So Charles remained Presbyterian, demanded that Queen Catherine convert and raise Princesess Catherine within the Covenant, and did not include the Dowager Duchess nor her daughters in the arrests that eventually led to the trial and execution of McDonald for regicide.

    Charles unified Scotland after the fears of civil war and then turned its attention to overseas. He found common cause with France, despite their religious differences, in that both were threatened by the alliance between Catholic England and the Catholic Hapsburgs. This gave Scotland the breathing room to explore trade with the Indies of the Far East and the Indies of the Carribean. He also hired Jacques Cartier to explore North America for Scotland and conceived of a Scottish Colony somewhere in North America, which didn't happen until after he'd died and his heir, his grandson, Prince Matthew, Duke of Albany succeeded him.

    Charles died at the ripe age of 77, still a robust man, when he was riding his horse and it tripped. He fell and broke his leg. While recovering it became infected and he did from the infection.

    [​IMG]
    Matthew I in his old age.

    [4] Matthew I was born the second son of Prince Henry, Duke of Albany and his wife, Princess Hedwig of Anhalt, being 'the spare' to his brother Prince Charles, Prince Matthew was educated for the possibility of one day wearing the crown, in addition to being tutored in the faith of the Scottish Kirk along side his older brother and their younger siblings.

    As the Prince became older he fell in with the clique of popular young noblemen that flocked around Prince Charles, this group of young men became notorious all throughout Scotland for their epic drinking binges, wild hunting parties, and an ever changing cast of young, beautiful women. The King was dismissive of complaints from the authorities about his grandsons behavior, seeing it as part of their growing up with their peers.

    The death of Charles and Matthew's father, Prince Henry, Duke of Albany in one of the last outbreaks of the Sweating Sickness bumped Matthew up in the succession, and forced the King to consider the marriages of his grandchildren.

    A prestigious continental match was made for Prince Charles, for Matthew his first wife was chosen from the Scottish nobility, Barbara Hamilton, a daughter of the prestigious Hamilton family, with whom he had two children before Barbara died in a miscarriage with what would have been their third child.

    King Charles began to consider a new marriage for his second grandson when another tragedy struck the House of Stewart with the unexpected death of Prince Charles, Duke of Albany when he fell out of a tower window while drunk, crashing onto the ground below.

    Prince Matthew was then made Duke of Albany and the heir to the Scottish throne, and his second marriage was not with a Scottish lady but with a German Princess, Anna Magdalene of Brandenburg with whom Matthew would have three children.

    Prince Matthew's partying ways slowed down considerably after the death of his first wife, and ended by the birth of his third child with Anna Magdalene, it was his second wife who encouraged his maturity, even encouraging regular church attendance, which earned the Prince (and his wife) the love of the ministers in the Church of Scotland.

    The 'long-wait' for the throne ended with the death of King Charles and the rise of King Matthew I to the throne.

    As the continent continued to convulse with the growing number of Protestant churches, internal schisms, Catholic Reformation, war and violence bloomed like flowers in spring. Scotland being relatively peaceful became a haven for various Calvinist and Presbyterian preachers.

    Problems for Scotland began when members of other groups within Protestantism found their way to Scotland, the various branches of Lutheranism, and more radical groups such as the Anabaptists and Nontrinitarian Christianity, these groups were not officially welcomed into the Kingdom but never the less they did gain small followings, particularly on the borderlands with England, which did allow these groups to slip between the border to preach in England and flee to the 'relative' safety of Scotland.

    This did anger the English authorities, however King Matthew was able to plead ignorance of the matter to King Henry XI of England, who also had to deal with rebellion in Ireland due to England's 'Plantations' in Ireland. Keeping England distracted with internal problems would prove to be King Matthew I's main policy of dealing with the English Kingdom.

    King Matthew I also served as a patron of literature and the arts in Scotland, seeing the rise of the 'Scottish Renaissance' that would outlast Matthew's reign, in addition to this King Matthew established a number of schools and two universities to promote education amongst the nobility and merchant classes.

    The King also considered a colonial project in the New World, however the costs at the time were seen as too high and Scotland's low population meant that there were a lack of volunteers to risk it all in a strange new land.

    However when Queen Anna Magdalene died at age 53 in 1619, it broke the King's heart, the remaining few years of his reign were spent in a gloomy court in perpetual mourning until King Matthew I was found to have passed in his sleep at age 58 in 1621, passing the crown to his son, James.


    [​IMG]
    Duncan III

    [5] Duncan Charles Stewart was born May 29, 1588, the eight child of then Prince Matthew, the sixth with his second wife, Anna Magdalene, and his third son and second son to survive to adulthood. He was 32 when he took the throne, a vibrant man and soldier, who'd fought in the wars of Religion on the Continent, alongside his mother's relatives, fighting for the Protestants of Brandenburg against the Holy Roman Empire and Poland. (OOC: the War known as the Thirty Years War in OTL is the Forty Years War in TTL, starting in 1609 instead of 1618. /OOC) His older brother, Prince Robert James Stewart died in 1620 only months before his father, and Prince Duncan was quickly made Duke of Albany and recalled from the wars on the Continent.

    Prince Robert was Duncan's senior by 7 years, the child that had led to their father settling down into a devout life. Robert had continued in that vein, becoming a devout man of art, literature, and science. He married his mother's cousin's daughter, Katrina of Brandenburg and had many children, but only daughters who survived past infancy. Robert never was a robust man, he was a thin, frail man, who started balding in his early twenties and often would be bedridden for a week or more with an illness. Finally one of those illnesses took him when he was not yet 40 years old.

    Prince Duncan, on the other hand, was a robust man, who as a child had loved the hunt, the Highlands, where the family had kept the Inverness Castle as a second home in the north, and revered his ancestors, Charles I and James V. Against his father's wishes, he'd gone to the continent to soldier as soon as the Wars of Religion began in the Forty Years War in 1609. There the little bit of German he'd learned from his mother became a second tongue for him. He was reknown for his courage and prowess in battle.

    It was a blow to him to have to return to Scotland while the war raged on. He not only grieved his older brother, whom he loved dearly, but also having to cease to be a soldier. He'd never married or even courted a woman. Now a friendship over the death of Robert led him and Katrina to become quite close. After the death of King Matthew, it was clear the wisest thing for Dunan was to marry the Princess. They did marry in 1622 and he became the stepfather of his nieces. However, he and Katrina were never able to conceive a child. It was clear they loved each other and neither one was ever unfaithful.

    Duncan remained robust throughout his life, an outdoors king. His long life amazed his contemporaries, living to the age of 102, being on the throne for yearly 70 years. By then his Queen, Katrina, and step daughters had all died, even some of his step-grandchildren who'd survived childhood had also died. It was said Duncan at age 100 resembled another man in his 80s; he still had all his mental facilities, all his teeth, a full head of hair, good eye sight and hearing, and stood strong and tall. He only declined in his last year of life.

    Duncan pursued colonies in North America, estabishing New Albion in the lands south of the St. Lawrence River Gulf (New Brunswich and Nova Scotia in OTL). He also established a colony in the East Indies in Timor, with the Dutch taking the rest.

    Scotland remained a devout land steeped in Presbyterianism, but this faith was one very open to the developing Science and drew men of learning in the new leaning from all over Europe to Scotland, where a Royal Academy was developed by Duncan and the Universities of Edinburgh and of Glasgow became among the most prestigious centers of learning in the world.

    Even though it was expected when the King's health began to turn as he entered his second century, it was still difficult for the kingdom to lose their long reigning king. He was suceeded by his great step-grandson, Prince Charles.

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    [6] Affectionately known as Sandy by close family and friends, from a childhood nickname due to his older brothers, being unable to say his name properly at a young age as the third son of the Prince James, Duke of Ross (1649–1688), and his wife Maria Katharina of Denmark and Norway, a daughter of Frederick III, King of Denmark and Sweden.
    Prince James was the son of Elizabeth, (eldest daughter of Prince Robert and Queen Katrina) and her husband, James Graham, 1st Marquess of Montrose, bringing the mighty clan Graham, into the royal family.

    Alexander was born in Mugdock Castle on 11 May 1682 and he was named the Earl of Dundee. The possibility of his becoming King seemed very remote; the King's oldest niece and heir, Princess Elizabeth, Alexander's father and his elder brothers Duncan and Robert were ahead of him in the succession. However, Princess Elizabeth died of pneumonia on 29 December 1682.
    On 11 February 1684, his father, Prince Robert, was stricken with measles and died, followed on 15 February by his second brother.
    On 19 February, it was found that both Alexander and his remaining older brother, Duncan, had the measles. The two brothers were treated in the traditional way, with bleeding.

    By the morning of the 20th, Prince Duncan died from the combination of the disease and the treatment. Fearing for her last child, Princess Maria, would not allow the doctors to bleed Alexander any further, pleading that if God was to take him from her, he would do so peacefully; he was very ill but survived.

    When Duncan III died, Alexander, at the age of eight, inherited the throne and would see his mother rule as regent along with his father’s cousin, Malcolm, Earl of Glasgow.

    Following his age of majority in 1698, Alexander became known as the Enlightenment King.

    He was the earliest opponent of capital punishment, abolishing the act in 1725, he would set about some of the greatest minds in Scotland to bring about an improved and reformed government.

    His marriage in 1702 to Henriette Albertine, Princess of Nassau-Dietz, (1686-1754) was seen as an unusual choice to ally with, but over time, the alliance between the Dutch Republic and Scotland, would be financially and militarily beneficial to both nations, with their joint naval knowledge, matching those of England, France and Spain.

    He modernized the Scottish bureaucracy and civil service and pursued religious policies throughout his realm that ranged from tolerance to segregation.

    He reformed the judicial system and made it possible for men not of noble status to become judges and senior bureaucrats.

    Alexander encouraged immigrants of various nationalities and faiths to come to Scotland and their colonies.

    He supported arts and philosophers, he favored as well as allowing complete freedom of the press and literature.

    Most modern biographers agree that Alexander, was primarily homosexual, and that his sexual orientation was central to his life and character, although he did his duty producing a male heir.

    Many modern historian, including Dean of Edinburgh University, Nicola Sturgeon, has called him "one of the most shrewd and sensible monarchs ever to wear a crown".
    As well as this, on his tomb is inscribed with this quote, “With the massive shoes left to him by his great-grandfather, a lesser man would have tripped and stumbled, whereas Alexander, proudly picked them up and carried on the legacy.”
     

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