List of German Chancellors (1949 - 2030)

...

I'm not seeing anything in that list suggesting that Die PARTEI, or the Titanic mag for that matter, exists.
 
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1949: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
1953: Kurt Schumacher (SPD)
1957: Kurt Schumacher (SPD)
1958: Erich Ollenhauer (SPD)
1961: Erich Ollenhauer (SPD)
1965: Gerhard Schroder (CDU)
1969: Erhard Eppler (SPD)
1972: Erhard Eppler (SDP-FDP)
1976: Helmut Kohl (CDU-Grüne) [1]
1980: Helmut Kohl (CDU)
1984: Helmut Kohl (CDU)
1988: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-SPD)
1991: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-SPD) [2]
1992: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP minority) [3]
1994: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-Grüne)
1998: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-Grüne)
2001: Thilo Sarrazin (SPD-NVP) [4]
2005: Gesine Schwan (SPD-Grüne) [5]
2009: Gesine Schwan (SPD-Grüne)
2012: Gesine Schwan (SPD-PDS) [6]
2016: Karl-Theodor Maria Nikolaus Johann Jacob Philipp Franz Joseph Sylvester Buhl-Freiherr von und zu Guttenberg (CSU-CDU-Grüne-FDP)
2018: David McAllister (FDP-CSU-CDU-Grüne) [7]
2022: David McAllister (FDP-CSU-CDU-Grüne) [8]
2025: Martin Sonneborn (PDS-SPD-CDU-CSU) [9]
2026: Martin Sonneborn (PDS-SPD-CDU-CSU) [10]

[1]
After a nuclear incident in the USSR the newly formed Greens gains massive in popularity. The CDU opposition promises environmental reforms and forms a coalition with the Green Party.
[2] First all-German election since 1938.
[3] After reunification the FDP-SPD coalition falls apart due to disagreements in fiscal and foreign policy. The SPD argued for increased taxes on rich people to pay to reunification. In addition left wing SPD members pressured the Government to leave Nato and called it a relict of the Cold War. After Genscher loses a Vote of no confidence in 1992 new elections are held place. While the FDP becomes the the strongest party in the parliament, Genscher fails to get an absolute majority. The SPD refuses any cooperation with Genscher and the CDU is too divided to form a coalition. The nationalist wing still blames Genscher for accepting the Oder-Neiße border. After weeks of political crisis Genscher forms a minority government backed by the Greens and parts of the CDU. At the same time SPD-FDP Governments in East Germany fall apart. In Thuringia and in Berlin the SPD forms minority governments backed the PDS.
[4] The Genscher government collapses after disputes over nuclear power and a series of terrorist attacks in Berlin and Munich provokes a wave of nativist sentiment. The Social Democrats run on a populistic, moderately Eurosceptical platform in opposition to mass immigration and forms a coalition with the right-wing populist Nationale Volkspartei (National People's Party) that many compare to France's National Front though they are very careful to purge any members with even a hint of neo-Nazi links.
[5] Sarrazin replaced by more "Green friendly" leader to allow formation of coalition. First female Chancellor.
[6] The Whistleblower and former NSA member Edward Snowden reveals that US intelligence agencies were spying on the German Population. Even Chancellor Schwan was revealed to be a target. After a snap election the populist PDS massively gains in popularity, while the traditional pro western parties like the Greens and the FDP lose in popularity. The SPD remains the strongest party and forms a coalition with PDS.
[7] A scandal of misappropriation of public funds directly involving Chancellor zu Guttenberg leads to his resignation. Early elections are called at a time deemed appropriate by the government. The majority is renew, this time with the FDP in the lead.
[8] Coalition retained, although strain is beginning to show between the partners.
[9] Following the McAllister coalition blowing up over FDP's opposition to rural subsidies and the Greens' climate concerns in agricultural policy, CDU/CSU decides that their voters' interests are better served with a left-populist government.
[10] Despite surviving numerous no confidence motions, the coalition government is returned in the on-schedule election.

Index of collaboratively created leader lists that are currently active -

List of US Presidents 1960 - 2020 - What if the Whig Party remained a major Party in the United States?

List of U.K. Prime Ministers 1945 - 2020 - TL#1 What if there were only single or non-concurrent term Prime Ministers? / TL#2 - What if the U.K. had been invaded by Nazi Germany and then liberated by the USA? [Feel free to update 1 or 2 or both!]

List of German Chancellors (1949 - 2030) - No theme, the inaugural list!

List of Prime Ministers of Canada, Australia and New Zealand - new thread!
 
...

I'm not seeing anything in that list suggesting that Die PARTEI, or the Titanic mag for that matter, exists.
I should probably add that I'm operating under the assumption that the political alignment is more different from OTL than the party names let on. In my mental image, the left is more socially conservative than OTL, with "wokeness" being a centrist position championed by FDP, while CDU after Kohl has become a rural populist party similar to the Scandinavian "Center" parties.
 
1949: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
1953: Kurt Schumacher (SPD)
1957: Kurt Schumacher (SPD)
1958: Erich Ollenhauer (SPD)
1961: Erich Ollenhauer (SPD)
1965: Gerhard Schroder (CDU)
1969: Erhard Eppler (SPD)
1972: Erhard Eppler (SDP-FDP)
1976: Helmut Kohl (CDU-Grüne) [1]
1980: Helmut Kohl (CDU)
1984: Helmut Kohl (CDU)
1988: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-SPD)
1991: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-SPD) [2]
1992: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP minority) [3]
1994: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-Grüne)
1998: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-Grüne)
2001: Thilo Sarrazin (SPD-NVP) [4]
2005: Gesine Schwan (SPD-Grüne) [5]
2009: Gesine Schwan (SPD-Grüne)
2012: Gesine Schwan (SPD-PDS) [6]
2016: Karl-Theodor Maria Nikolaus Johann Jacob Philipp Franz Joseph Sylvester Buhl-Freiherr von und zu Guttenberg (CSU-CDU-Grüne-FDP)
2018: David McAllister (FDP-CSU-CDU-Grüne) [7]
2022: David McAllister (FDP-CSU-CDU-Grüne) [8]
2025: Martin Sonneborn (PDS-SPD-CDU-CSU) [9]
2026: Martin Sonneborn (PDS-SPD-CDU-CSU) [10]
2030: Martin Sonneborn (NVP-PDS-SPD-CDU) [11]


[1]
After a nuclear incident in the USSR the newly formed Greens gains massive in popularity. The CDU opposition promises environmental reforms and forms a coalition with the Green Party.
[2] First all-German election since 1938.
[3] After reunification the FDP-SPD coalition falls apart due to disagreements in fiscal and foreign policy. The SPD argued for increased taxes on rich people to pay to reunification. In addition left wing SPD members pressured the Government to leave Nato and called it a relict of the Cold War. After Genscher loses a Vote of no confidence in 1992 new elections are held place. While the FDP becomes the the strongest party in the parliament, Genscher fails to get an absolute majority. The SPD refuses any cooperation with Genscher and the CDU is too divided to form a coalition. The nationalist wing still blames Genscher for accepting the Oder-Neiße border. After weeks of political crisis Genscher forms a minority government backed by the Greens and parts of the CDU. At the same time SPD-FDP Governments in East Germany fall apart. In Thuringia and in Berlin the SPD forms minority governments backed the PDS.
[4] The Genscher government collapses after disputes over nuclear power and a series of terrorist attacks in Berlin and Munich provokes a wave of nativist sentiment. The Social Democrats run on a populistic, moderately Eurosceptical platform in opposition to mass immigration and forms a coalition with the right-wing populist Nationale Volkspartei (National People's Party) that many compare to France's National Front though they are very careful to purge any members with even a hint of neo-Nazi links.
[5] Sarrazin replaced by more "Green friendly" leader to allow formation of coalition. First female Chancellor.
[6] The Whistleblower and former NSA member Edward Snowden reveals that US intelligence agencies were spying on the German Population. Even Chancellor Schwan was revealed to be a target. After a snap election the populist PDS massively gains in popularity, while the traditional pro western parties like the Greens and the FDP lose in popularity. The SPD remains the strongest party and forms a coalition with PDS.
[7] A scandal of misappropriation of public funds directly involving Chancellor zu Guttenberg leads to his resignation. Early elections are called at a time deemed appropriate by the government. The majority is renew, this time with the FDP in the lead.
[8] Coalition retained, although strain is beginning to show between the partners.
[9] Following the McAllister coalition blowing up over FDP's opposition to rural subsidies and the Greens' climate concerns in agricultural policy, CDU/CSU decides that their voters' interests are better served with a left-populist government.
[10] Despite surviving numerous no confidence motions, the coalition government is returned in the on-schedule election.
[11] Negotiations on the treaty establishing a federal Europe lead to a new breakdown of the majority a few months before the 2030 elections. Martin Sonneborn surprises everyone saving himself by bringing the NVP into his government, creating a majority of Eurosceptics and populists. The NVP is the biggest party in the Bundestag but Sonneborn keeps the chancellery to ensure the support of the SPD.
 
I should probably add that I'm operating under the assumption that the political alignment is more different from OTL than the party names let on. In my mental image, the left is more socially conservative than OTL, with "wokeness" being a centrist position championed by FDP, while CDU after Kohl has become a rural populist party similar to the Scandinavian "Center" parties.
Agree. I think the political alignment in this TL is really interesting. The SPD is more left wing and populist, the Greens are centrists and support Nato and foreign intervention and the CDU/CSU is just a minor rural party, while the FDP is the major centre/centre-right party.
 
Okay lets start a new TL.

1949: Kurt Schumacher (SPD-CSP) [1]


[1]
After negotiations for a united party for northern protestants and southern catholics fail, the southern catholics form their own party. After the first elections in the FRG, an SPD-CSP coalition is formed.
 

1949: Kurt Schumacher (SPD-CSP) [1]
1953: Jakob Kaiser (CSP-SPD)


[1] After negotiations for a united party for northern protestants and southern catholics fail, the southern catholics form their own party. After the first elections in the FRG, an SPD-CSP coalition is formed.
[/B]
 
1949: Kurt Schumacher (SPD-CSP) [1]
1953: Jakob Kaiser (CSP-SPD)
1957: Jakob Kaiser (CSP-DDP-VP) [2]


[1]
After negotiations for a united party for northern protestants and southern catholics fail, the southern catholics form their own party. After the first elections in the FRG, an SPD-CSP coalition is formed.
[2] Despite cordial relations between the two coalition partners, the Chancellor turns to the new German Democratic Party and the agrarian People's Party to form a new government
 
1949: Kurt Schumacher (SPD-CSP) [1]
1953: Jakob Kaiser (CSP-SPD)
1957: Jakob Kaiser (CSP-DDP-VP) [2]
1961: Ludwig Erhard (CSP-VP) [3]


[1] After negotiations for a united party for northern protestants and southern catholics fail, the southern catholics form their own party. After the first elections in the FRG, an SPD-CSP coalition is formed.
[2] Despite cordial relations between the two coalition partners, the Chancellor turns to the new German Democratic Party and the agrarian People's Party to form a new government
[3] With his health failing, Kaiser decided to forgo participation in the 1961 Federal Election, allowing his Minister of Economics, Ludwig Erhard to gain the reins of power. Erhard managed to increase his party's standing in the Bundestag, allowing him to dump the DDP and instead work with the Volks Partei. The first term of his premiership would see the creation of the North Atlantic Free Trade Area, a trading bloc that would include Britain, Ireland, Canada, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, and the United States as well as his native Germany.
 
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1949: Kurt Schumacher (SPD-CSP) [1]
1953: Jakob Kaiser (CSP-SPD)
1957: Jakob Kaiser (CSP-DDP-VP) [2]
1961: Ludwig Erhard (CSP-VP) [3]
1965: Ludwig Erhard (CSP-VP)


[1] After negotiations for a united party for northern protestants and southern catholics fail, the southern catholics form their own party. After the first elections in the FRG, an SPD-CSP coalition is formed.
[2] Despite cordial relations between the two coalition partners, the Chancellor turns to the new German Democratic Party and the agrarian People's Party to form a new government
[3] With his health failing, Kaiser decided to forgo participation in the 1961 Federal Election, allowing his Minister of Economics, Ludwig Erhard to gain the reins of power. Erhard managed to increase his party's standing in the Bundestag, allowing him to dump the DDP and instead work with the Volks Partei. The first term of his premiership would see the creation of the North Atlantic Free Trade Area, a trading bloc that would include Britain, Ireland, Canada, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, and the United States as well as his native Germany.
 
1949: Kurt Schumacher (SPD-CSP) [1]
1953: Jakob Kaiser (CSP-SPD)
1957: Jakob Kaiser (CSP-DDP-VP) [2]
1961: Ludwig Erhard (CSP-VP) [3]
1965: Ludwig Erhard (CSP-VP)
1969: Rainer Barzel (CSP-DDP) [4]

[1]
After negotiations for a united party for northern protestants and southern catholics fail, the southern catholics form their own party. After the first elections in the FRG, an SPD-CSP coalition is formed.
[2] Despite cordial relations between the two coalition partners, the Chancellor turns to the new German Democratic Party and the agrarian People's Party to form a new government
[3] With his health failing, Kaiser decided to forgo participation in the 1961 Federal Election, allowing his Minister of Economics, Ludwig Erhard to gain the reins of power. Erhard managed to increase his party's standing in the Bundestag, allowing him to dump the DDP and instead work with the Volks Partei. The first term of his premiership would see the creation of the North Atlantic Free Trade Area, a trading bloc that would include Britain, Ireland, Canada, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, and the United States as well as his native Germany.
[4] The exercise of power weakens Ehrard over time and forces him to let his foreign minister Barzel succeed him in the chancellery. The latter implements the "Westpolitik", a doctrine of rupture in inter-German relations. The country builds his own identity by looking to the west and is actively moving away from its eastern neighbour. It leads to a break with the VP and its pan-German elements. Frankfurt am Main becomes the federal capital.
 
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1949: Kurt Schumacher (SPD-CSP) [1]
1953: Jakob Kaiser (CSP-SPD)
1957: Jakob Kaiser (CSP-DDP-VP) [2]
1961: Ludwig Erhard (CSP-VP) [3]
1965: Ludwig Erhard (CSP-VP)
1969: Rainer Barzel (CSP-DDP) [4]
1973: Willy Brandt (SPD-KPD) [5]

[1]
After negotiations for a united party for northern protestants and southern catholics fail, the southern catholics form their own party. After the first elections in the FRG, an SPD-CSP coalition is formed.
[2] Despite cordial relations between the two coalition partners, the Chancellor turns to the new German Democratic Party and the agrarian People's Party to form a new government
[3] With his health failing, Kaiser decided to forgo participation in the 1961 Federal Election, allowing his Minister of Economics, Ludwig Erhard to gain the reins of power. Erhard managed to increase his party's standing in the Bundestag, allowing him to dump the DDP and instead work with the Volks Partei. The first term of his premiership would see the creation of the North Atlantic Free Trade Area, a trading bloc that would include Britain, Ireland, Canada, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, and the United States as well as his native Germany.
[4] The exercise of power weakens Ehrard over time and forces him to let his foreign minister Barzel succeed him in the chancellery. The latter implements the "Westpolitik", a doctrine of rupture in inter-German relations. The country builds his own identity by looking to the west and is actively moving away from its eastern neighbour. It leads to a break with the VP and its pan-German elements. Frankfurt am Main becomes the federal capital.
[5] The double whammy of the Oil Crisis of 1972 and generic CSP fatigue leads to a landslide victory for a far-left government.

(OOC: This is the original KPD. I'm implying that, with a more Christian Socialist '50s alt-CDU eschewing Westbindung up until Barzel, OTL's KPD ban doesn't happen.)
 
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1949: Kurt Schumacher (SPD-CSP) [1]
1953: Jakob Kaiser (CSP-SPD)
1957: Jakob Kaiser (CSP-DDP-VP) [2]
1961: Ludwig Erhard (CSP-VP) [3]
1965: Ludwig Erhard (CSP-VP)
1969: Rainer Barzel (CSP-DDP) [4]
1973: Willy Brandt (SPD-KPD) [5]
1975: Fritz Thielen (Chancellor of the Liberal Democratic Transitional Government, (DDB/DVB) - originally DP) [6]

[1]
After negotiations for a united party for northern protestants and southern catholics fail, the southern catholics form their own party. After the first elections in the FRG, an SPD-CSP coalition is formed.
[2] Despite cordial relations between the two coalition partners, the Chancellor turns to the new German Democratic Party and the agrarian People's Party to form a new government
[3] With his health failing, Kaiser decided to forgo participation in the 1961 Federal Election, allowing his Minister of Economics, Ludwig Erhard to gain the reins of power. Erhard managed to increase his party's standing in the Bundestag, allowing him to dump the DDP and instead work with the Volks Partei. The first term of his premiership would see the creation of the North Atlantic Free Trade Area, a trading bloc that would include Britain, Ireland, Canada, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, and the United States as well as his native Germany.
[4] The exercise of power weakens Ehrard over time and forces him to let his foreign minister Barzel succeed him in the chancellery. The latter implements the "Westpolitik", a doctrine of rupture in inter-German relations. The country builds his own identity by looking to the west and is actively moving away from its eastern neighbour. It leads to a break with the VP and its pan-German elements. Frankfurt am Main becomes the federal capital.
[5] The double whammy of the Oil Crisis of 1972 and generic CSP fatigue leads to a landslide victory for a far-left government.
[6] Acts of resistance and civil disobedience soon steeply rose, soon followed by violent far-right nationalist terrorism in the wake of mass demonstrations against the KPD. But what few expected was, after an Anerkennungsvertrag ("Treaty of Recognition") was concluded in Weimar (East Germany) and, at least in some circles, hailed as a "monumental peace treaty", much of the German population believed it to be an act of "selling our soul, our democracy and the chance of reunification to Moscow and the commies". Riots and even bigger demonstrations - and even some terrorist attacks against mainly KPD, but also SPD, party offices, trade unions, but also against anything to do with cooperation with East Germany - shook cities from Stuttgart to Hamburg and towns from Passau to Aurich. As a supposed "concession", Brandt asked the Vertrauensfrage, with the intention of a defeat,- but several CSP and even four DDP MdBs voted for Brandt. However, with the Guillaume affair and the apparent bribes to some representatives of the DDP by East Germany coming to light, Brandt once again asked the Vertrauensfrage. But this time, unbeknownst to most, the military and a Deutsche Demokratische Bewegung (DDB) had taken control of Bonn. On September 11, 1975, two CSP and a VP delegate voted for Brandt. The governmental buildings were stormed in what could only be called a popular-supported coup d'état, and the Freiheitlich-Demokratische Übergangsregierung (approx. "Liberal Democratic Transitional government") was formed of several senior military officers and high-ranking DDP and VP, not to forget remnant Zentrum and DP, politicians. Officially it is led by the Deutsche Demokratische Bewegung and Deutsche Volksbewegung, the two leading groups that were opposing the far-left government on the streets.


(OOC: This is the original KPD. I'm implying that, with a more Christian Socialist '50s alt-CDU eschewing Westbindung up until Barzel, OTL's KPD ban doesn't happen.)
 
1949: Kurt Schumacher (SPD-CSP) [1]
1953: Jakob Kaiser (CSP-SPD)
1957: Jakob Kaiser (CSP-DDP-VP) [2]
1961: Ludwig Erhard (CSP-VP) [3]
1965: Ludwig Erhard (CSP-VP)
1969: Rainer Barzel (CSP-DDP) [4]
1973: Willy Brandt (SPD-KPD) [5]
1975: Fritz Thielen (Chancellor of the Liberal Democratic Transitional Government, (DDB/DVB) - originally DP) [6]
1975: Helmut Schmidt (SPD-DDP-CSP) [7]

[1]
After negotiations for a united party for northern protestants and southern catholics fail, the southern catholics form their own party. After the first elections in the FRG, an SPD-CSP coalition is formed.
[2] Despite cordial relations between the two coalition partners, the Chancellor turns to the new German Democratic Party and the agrarian People's Party to form a new government
[3] With his health failing, Kaiser decided to forgo participation in the 1961 Federal Election, allowing his Minister of Economics, Ludwig Erhard to gain the reins of power. Erhard managed to increase his party's standing in the Bundestag, allowing him to dump the DDP and instead work with the Volks Partei. The first term of his premiership would see the creation of the North Atlantic Free Trade Area, a trading bloc that would include Britain, Ireland, Canada, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, and the United States as well as his native Germany.
[4] The exercise of power weakens Ehrard over time and forces him to let his foreign minister Barzel succeed him in the chancellery. The latter implements the "Westpolitik", a doctrine of rupture in inter-German relations. The country builds his own identity by looking to the west and is actively moving away from its eastern neighbour. It leads to a break with the VP and its pan-German elements. Frankfurt am Main becomes the federal capital.
[5] The double whammy of the Oil Crisis of 1972 and generic CSP fatigue leads to a landslide victory for a far-left government.
[6] Acts of resistance and civil disobedience soon steeply rose, soon followed by violent far-right nationalist terrorism in the wake of mass demonstrations against the KPD. But what few expected was, after an Anerkennungsvertrag ("Treaty of Recognition") was concluded in Weimar (East Germany) and, at least in some circles, hailed as a "monumental peace treaty", much of the German population believed it to be an act of "selling our soul, our democracy and the chance of reunification to Moscow and the commies". Riots and even bigger demonstrations - and even some terrorist attacks against mainly KPD, but also SPD, party offices, trade unions, but also against anything to do with cooperation with East Germany - shook cities from Stuttgart to Hamburg and towns from Passau to Aurich. As a supposed "concession", Brandt asked the Vertrauensfrage, with the intention of a defeat,- but several CSP and even four DDP MdBs voted for Brandt. However, with the Guillaume affair and the apparent bribes to some representatives of the DDP by East Germany coming to light, Brandt once again asked the Vertrauensfrage. But this time, unbeknownst to most, the military and a Deutsche Demokratische Bewegung (DDB) had taken control of Bonn. On September 11, 1975, two CSP and a VP delegate voted for Brandt. The governmental buildings were stormed in what could only be called a popular-supported coup d'état, and the Freiheitlich-Demokratische Übergangsregierung (approx. "Liberal Democratic Transitional government") was formed of several senior military officers and high-ranking DDP and VP, not to forget remnant Zentrum and DP, politicians. Officially it is led by the Deutsche Demokratische Bewegung and Deutsche Volksbewegung, the two leading groups that were opposing the far-left government on the streets.
[7] The Thielen Putsch almost immediately provoked a domestic and international crisis of unprecedented proportions, bringing the world extremely close to nuclear war. Much of the domestic left saw the overthrow by the military and right-wing parties as a resurrection of the Third Reich, and as a result even moderate centre-left politicians and trade union leaders called for mass protests as well as a general strike. The German economy found itself immediately crippled by a near complete shut-down of the manufacturing sector as well as public sectors. Nor was the international community please-both US President Humphrey and UK Prime Minister Callaghan refused to recognize the new government and demanded the immediate release of Brandt as well as other arrested politicians. The Soviet and DDR reacted even more aggressively, proclaiming the revenge of the German Deep State and immediately cut off all access to West Berlin while placing its military forces on the highest level of alert. Political violence reached unprecedented levels and in the Bloody Autumn, some 300 people were killed by far right or far left armed groups. By early November, moderate elements of the Bundeswehr had reasserted themselves, pushing out the more radical officers. Eventually Thielen and other coup plotters were forced to step down and promptly arrested, before a bureaucratic caretaker government was appointed by President Scheel, headed by Helmut Schmidt the leader of the right-wing faction of the SPD who had always opposed the Treaty. Brandt seceded and created his own Independent SPD, recalling the USPD of fifty years before. However, Schmidt's mainstream SPD along with other centrist pro-democratic parties won in a landslide in the elections of December 1975 forming a stable majority.
 
Was mid-way through updating the list when I saw new update from Marius Mazzini - luckily my update could be snuck in with one minor edit

1949: Kurt Schumacher (SPD-CSP) [1]
1953: Jakob Kaiser (CSP-SPD)
1957: Jakob Kaiser (CSP-DDP-VP) [2]
1961: Ludwig Erhard (CSP-VP) [3]
1965: Ludwig Erhard (CSP-VP)
1969: Rainer Barzel (CSP-DDP) [4]
1973: Willy Brandt (SPD-KPD*) [5]
1975: Fritz Thielen (Chancellor of the Liberal Democratic Transitional Government, (DDB/DVB) - originally DP) [6]
1976: Fritz Thielen DDB/DVB-Zentrum) [7]
1977: Helmut Schmidt (SPD-DDP-CSP) [8]

*OOC: This is the original KPD. I'm implying that, with a more Christian Socialist '50s alt-CDU eschewing Westbindung up until Barzel, OTL's KPD ban doesn't happen.

[1]
After negotiations for a united party for northern protestants and southern catholics fail, the southern catholics form their own party. After the first elections in the FRG, an SPD-CSP coalition is formed.
[2] Despite cordial relations between the two coalition partners, the Chancellor turns to the new German Democratic Party and the agrarian People's Party to form a new government
[3] With his health failing, Kaiser decided to forgo participation in the 1961 Federal Election, allowing his Minister of Economics, Ludwig Erhard to gain the reins of power. Erhard managed to increase his party's standing in the Bundestag, allowing him to dump the DDP and instead work with the Volks Partei. The first term of his premiership would see the creation of the North Atlantic Free Trade Area, a trading bloc that would include Britain, Ireland, Canada, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, and the United States as well as his native Germany.
[4] The exercise of power weakens Ehrard over time and forces him to let his foreign minister Barzel succeed him in the chancellery. The latter implements the "Westpolitik", a doctrine of rupture in inter-German relations. The country builds his own identity by looking to the west and is actively moving away from its eastern neighbour. It leads to a break with the VP and its pan-German elements. Frankfurt am Main becomes the federal capital.
[5] The double whammy of the Oil Crisis of 1972 and generic CSP fatigue leads to a landslide victory for a far-left government.
[6] Acts of resistance and civil disobedience soon steeply rose, soon followed by violent far-right nationalist terrorism in the wake of mass demonstrations against the KPD. But what few expected was, after an Anerkennungsvertrag ("Treaty of Recognition") was concluded in Weimar (East Germany) and, at least in some circles, hailed as a "monumental peace treaty", much of the German population believed it to be an act of "selling our soul, our democracy and the chance of reunification to Moscow and the commies". Riots and even bigger demonstrations - and even some terrorist attacks against mainly KPD, but also SPD, party offices, trade unions, but also against anything to do with cooperation with East Germany - shook cities from Stuttgart to Hamburg and towns from Passau to Aurich. As a supposed "concession", Brandt asked the Vertrauensfrage, with the intention of a defeat,- but several CSP and even four DDP MdBs voted for Brandt. However, with the Guillaume affair and the apparent bribes to some representatives of the DDP by East Germany coming to light, Brandt once again asked the Vertrauensfrage. But this time, unbeknownst to most, the military and a Deutsche Demokratische Bewegung (DDB) had taken control of Bonn. On September 11, 1975, two CSP and a VP delegate voted for Brandt. The governmental buildings were stormed in what could only be called a popular-supported coup d'état, and the Freiheitlich-Demokratische Übergangsregierung (approx. "Liberal Democratic Transitional government") was formed of several senior military officers and high-ranking DDP and VP, not to forget remnant Zentrum and DP, politicians. Officially it is led by the Deutsche Demokratische Bewegung and Deutsche Volksbewegung, the two leading groups that were opposing the far-left government on the streets.
[7] "Democracy" back; with supervised elections; the outcome assured.
[8] The Thielen Putsch almost immediately provoked a domestic and international crisis of unprecedented proportions, bringing the world extremely close to nuclear war. Much of the domestic left saw the overthrow by the military and right-wing parties as a resurrection of the Third Reich, and as a result even moderate centre-left politicians and trade union leaders called for mass protests as well as a general strike. The German economy found itself immediately crippled by a near complete shut-down of the manufacturing sector as well as public sectors. Nor was the international community please-both US President Humphrey and UK Prime Minister Callaghan refused to recognize the new government and demanded the immediate release of Brandt as well as other arrested politicians. The Soviet and DDR reacted even more aggressively, proclaiming the revenge of the German Deep State and immediately cut off all access to West Berlin while placing its military forces on the highest level of alert. Political violence reached unprecedented levels and in the Bloody Autumn, some 300 people were killed by far right or far left armed groups. By early November, moderate elements of the Bundeswehr had reasserted themselves, pushing out the more radical officers. Eventually Thielen and other coup plotters were forced to step down and promptly arrested, before a bureaucratic caretaker government was appointed by President Scheel, headed by Helmut Schmidt the leader of the right-wing faction of the SPD who had always opposed the Treaty. Brandt seceded and created his own Independent SPD, recalling the USPD of fifty years before. However, Schmidt's mainstream SPD along with other centrist pro-democratic parties won in a landslide in the elections of December 1977 forming a stable majority.


Index of collaboratively created leader lists that are currently active -

List of US Presidents 1960 - 2020 - What if the Whig Party remained a major Party in the United States?

List of U.K. Prime Ministers 1945 - 2020 - TL#1 What if there were only single or non-concurrent term Prime Ministers? / TL#2 - What if the U.K. had been invaded by Nazi Germany and then liberated by the USA? [Feel free to update 1 or 2 or both!]

List of German Chancellors (1949 - 2030) - TL #2

List of Prime Ministers of Canada, Australia and New Zealand - new thread!
 
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1949: Kurt Schumacher (SPD-CSP) [1]
1953: Jakob Kaiser (CSP-SPD)
1957: Jakob Kaiser (CSP-DDP-VP) [2]
1961: Ludwig Erhard (CSP-VP) [3]
1965: Ludwig Erhard (CSP-VP)
1969: Rainer Barzel (CSP-DDP) [4]
1973: Willy Brandt (SPD-KPD) [5]
1975: Fritz Thielen (Chancellor of the Liberal Democratic Transitional Government, (DDB/DVB) - originally DP) [6]
1976: Fritz Thielen DDB/DVB-Zentrum) [7]
1977: Helmut Schmidt (SPD-DDP-CSP) [8]
1981: Helmut Schmidt (SPD-DDP-CSP) [9]

[1]
After negotiations for a united party for northern protestants and southern catholics fail, the southern catholics form their own party. After the first elections in the FRG, an SPD-CSP coalition is formed.
[2] Despite cordial relations between the two coalition partners, the Chancellor turns to the new German Democratic Party and the agrarian People's Party to form a new government
[3] With his health failing, Kaiser decided to forgo participation in the 1961 Federal Election, allowing his Minister of Economics, Ludwig Erhard to gain the reins of power. Erhard managed to increase his party's standing in the Bundestag, allowing him to dump the DDP and instead work with the Volks Partei. The first term of his premiership would see the creation of the North Atlantic Free Trade Area, a trading bloc that would include Britain, Ireland, Canada, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, and the United States as well as his native Germany.
[4] The exercise of power weakens Ehrard over time and forces him to let his foreign minister Barzel succeed him in the chancellery. The latter implements the "Westpolitik", a doctrine of rupture in inter-German relations. The country builds his own identity by looking to the west and is actively moving away from its eastern neighbour. It leads to a break with the VP and its pan-German elements. Frankfurt am Main becomes the federal capital.
[5] The double whammy of the Oil Crisis of 1972 and generic CSP fatigue leads to a landslide victory for a far-left government.
[6] Acts of resistance and civil disobedience soon steeply rose, soon followed by violent far-right nationalist terrorism in the wake of mass demonstrations against the KPD. But what few expected was, after an Anerkennungsvertrag ("Treaty of Recognition") was concluded in Weimar (East Germany) and, at least in some circles, hailed as a "monumental peace treaty", much of the German population believed it to be an act of "selling our soul, our democracy and the chance of reunification to Moscow and the commies". Riots and even bigger demonstrations - and even some terrorist attacks against mainly KPD, but also SPD, party offices, trade unions, but also against anything to do with cooperation with East Germany - shook cities from Stuttgart to Hamburg and towns from Passau to Aurich. As a supposed "concession", Brandt asked the Vertrauensfrage, with the intention of a defeat,- but several CSP and even four DDP MdBs voted for Brandt. However, with the Guillaume affair and the apparent bribes to some representatives of the DDP by East Germany coming to light, Brandt once again asked the Vertrauensfrage. But this time, unbeknownst to most, the military and a Deutsche Demokratische Bewegung (DDB) had taken control of Bonn. On September 11, 1975, two CSP and a VP delegate voted for Brandt. The governmental buildings were stormed in what could only be called a popular-supported coup d'état, and the Freiheitlich-Demokratische Übergangsregierung (approx. "Liberal Democratic Transitional government") was formed of several senior military officers and high-ranking DDP and VP, not to forget remnant Zentrum and DP, politicians. Officially it is led by the Deutsche Demokratische Bewegung and Deutsche Volksbewegung, the two leading groups that were opposing the far-left government on the streets.
[7] "Democracy" back; with supervised elections; the outcome assured.
[8] The Thielen Putsch almost immediately provoked a domestic and international crisis of unprecedented proportions, bringing the world extremely close to nuclear war. Much of the domestic left saw the overthrow by the military and right-wing parties as a resurrection of the Third Reich, and as a result even moderate centre-left politicians and trade union leaders called for mass protests as well as a general strike. The German economy found itself immediately crippled by a near complete shut-down of the manufacturing sector as well as public sectors. Nor was the international community please-both US President Humphrey and UK Prime Minister Callaghan refused to recognize the new government and demanded the immediate release of Brandt as well as other arrested politicians. The Soviet and DDR reacted even more aggressively, proclaiming the revenge of the German Deep State and immediately cut off all access to West Berlin while placing its military forces on the highest level of alert. Political violence reached unprecedented levels and in the Bloody Autumn, some 300 people were killed by far right or far left armed groups. By early November, moderate elements of the Bundeswehr had reasserted themselves, pushing out the more radical officers. Eventually Thielen and other coup plotters were forced to step down and promptly arrested, before a bureaucratic caretaker government was appointed by President Scheel, headed by Helmut Schmidt the leader of the right-wing faction of the SPD who had always opposed the Treaty. Brandt seceded and created his own Independent SPD, recalling the USPD of fifty years before. However, Schmidt's mainstream SPD along with other centrist pro-democratic parties won in a landslide in the elections of December 1977 forming a stable majority.
[9] The Wiederaufbaukoalition is returned to power. The government of national unity is focusing on three points: sanitize German democracy, rebuilding a sense of national unity and restoring Germany's credibility in the international stage. To do so, the promise of drafting a real constitution that should be approved by the people has been made and negotiations are slowly beginning under the Western allies eyes.
 
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