List of German Chancellors (1949 - 2030)

Alternate list of Chairmen of the Council of Ministers of the DDR:

1949 - 1964: Otto Grotewohl (SED)
1964 - 1973: Willi Stoph (SED)
1973 - 1976: Horst Sindermann (SED)
1976 - 1994: Willi Stoph (SED)
1994 - 1998: Kurt Hager (SED)
1998 - 2009: Manfred Flegel (LDPD)
2009 - 2014: Marlies Deneke (SED)
2014 - 2020: Hans Reichelt (DBD)
 
Just an FYI for everyone (and let me preface this by saying I don't want to sound like a dick), this is a collaborative thread. If you have a cool list that you worked on solo that you'd like to post featuring German chancellors, the Alternate Leaders List in the Chat would be the better choice to post it in.
 
Just an FYI for everyone (and let me preface this by saying I don't want to sound like a dick), this is a collaborative thread. If you have a cool list that you worked on solo that you'd like to post featuring German chancellors, the Alternate Leaders List in the Chat would be the better choice to post it in.
Didn't know that, sorry
 
1949: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
1953: Kurt Schumacher (SPD)
1957: Kurt Schumacher (SPD)
1958: Erich Ollenhauer (SPD)
1961: Erich Ollenhauer (SPD)
1965: Gerhard Schroder (CDU)
1969: Erhard Eppler (SPD)
1972: Erhard Eppler (SDP-FDP)
1976: Helmut Kohl (CDU-Grüne) [1]
1980: Helmut Kohl (CDU)
1984: Helmut Kohl (CDU)
1988: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-SPD)
1991: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-SPD) [2]
1992: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP minority) [3]
1994: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-Grüne)
1998: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-Grüne)

2001: Thilo Sarrazin (SPD-NVP) [4]

[1]
After a nuclear incident in the USSR the newly formed Greens gains massive in popularity. The CDU opposition promises environmental reforms and forms a coalition with the Green Party.
[2] First all-German election since 1938.
[3] After reunification the FDP-SPD coalition falls apart due to disagreements in fiscal and foreign policy. The SPD argued for increased taxes on rich people to pay to reunification. In addition left wing SPD members pressured the Government to leave Nato and called it a relict of the Cold War. After Genscher loses a Vote of no confidence in 1992 new elections are held place. While the FDP becomes the the strongest party in the parliament, Genscher fails to get an absolute majority. The SPD refuses any cooperation with Genscher and the CDU is too divided to form a coalition. The nationalist wing still blames Genscher for accepting the Oder-Neiße border. After weeks of political crisis Genscher forms a minority government backed by the Greens and parts of the CDU. At the same time SPD-FDP Governments in East Germany fall apart. In Thuringia and in Berlin the SPD forms minority governments backed the PDS.
[4] The Genscher government collapses after disputes over nuclear power and a series of terrorist attacks in Berlin and Munich provokes a wave of nativist sentiment. The Social Democrats run on a populistic, moderately Eurosceptical platform in opposition to mass immigration and forms a coalition with the right-wing populist Nationale Volkspartei (National People's Party) that many compare to France's National Front though they are very careful to purge any members with even a hint of neo-Nazi links.
 
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1949: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
1953: Kurt Schumacher (SPD)
1957: Kurt Schumacher (SPD)
1958: Erich Ollenhauer (SPD)
1961: Erich Ollenhauer (SPD)
1965: Gerhard Schroder (CDU)
1969: Erhard Eppler (SPD)
1972: Erhard Eppler (SDP-FDP)
1976: Helmut Kohl (CDU-Grüne) [1]
1980: Helmut Kohl (CDU)
1984: Helmut Kohl (CDU)
1988: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-SPD)
1991: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-SPD) [2]
1992: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP minority) [3]
1994: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-Grüne)
1998: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-Grüne)
2001: Thilo Sarrazin (SPD-NVP) [4]
2005: Gesine Schwan (SPD-Grüne) [5]

[1]
After a nuclear incident in the USSR the newly formed Greens gains massive in popularity. The CDU opposition promises environmental reforms and forms a coalition with the Green Party.
[2] First all-German election since 1938.
[3] After reunification the FDP-SPD coalition falls apart due to disagreements in fiscal and foreign policy. The SPD argued for increased taxes on rich people to pay to reunification. In addition left wing SPD members pressured the Government to leave Nato and called it a relict of the Cold War. After Genscher loses a Vote of no confidence in 1992 new elections are held place. While the FDP becomes the the strongest party in the parliament, Genscher fails to get an absolute majority. The SPD refuses any cooperation with Genscher and the CDU is too divided to form a coalition. The nationalist wing still blames Genscher for accepting the Oder-Neiße border. After weeks of political crisis Genscher forms a minority government backed by the Greens and parts of the CDU. At the same time SPD-FDP Governments in East Germany fall apart. In Thuringia and in Berlin the SPD forms minority governments backed the PDS.
[4] The Genscher government collapses after disputes over nuclear power and a series of terrorist attacks in Berlin and Munich provokes a wave of nativist sentiment. The Social Democrats run on a populistic, moderately Eurosceptical platform in opposition to mass immigration and forms a coalition with the right-wing populist Nationale Volkspartei (National People's Party) that many compare to France's National Front though they are very careful to purge any members with even a hint of neo-Nazi links.
[5] Sarrazin replaced by more "Green friendly" leader to allow formation of coalition. First female Chancellor.

Index of currently active Collaborative Leader lists -
 
1949: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
1953: Kurt Schumacher (SPD)
1957: Kurt Schumacher (SPD)
1958: Erich Ollenhauer (SPD)
1961: Erich Ollenhauer (SPD)
1965: Gerhard Schroder (CDU)
1969: Erhard Eppler (SPD)
1972: Erhard Eppler (SDP-FDP)
1976: Helmut Kohl (CDU-Grüne) [1]
1980: Helmut Kohl (CDU)
1984: Helmut Kohl (CDU)
1988: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-SPD)
1991: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-SPD) [2]
1992: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP minority) [3]
1994: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-Grüne)
1998: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-Grüne)
2001: Thilo Sarrazin (SPD-NVP) [4]
2005: Gesine Schwan (SPD-Grüne) [5]
2009: Gesine Schwan (SPD-Grüne)

[1]
After a nuclear incident in the USSR the newly formed Greens gains massive in popularity. The CDU opposition promises environmental reforms and forms a coalition with the Green Party.
[2] First all-German election since 1938.
[3] After reunification the FDP-SPD coalition falls apart due to disagreements in fiscal and foreign policy. The SPD argued for increased taxes on rich people to pay to reunification. In addition left wing SPD members pressured the Government to leave Nato and called it a relict of the Cold War. After Genscher loses a Vote of no confidence in 1992 new elections are held place. While the FDP becomes the the strongest party in the parliament, Genscher fails to get an absolute majority. The SPD refuses any cooperation with Genscher and the CDU is too divided to form a coalition. The nationalist wing still blames Genscher for accepting the Oder-Neiße border. After weeks of political crisis Genscher forms a minority government backed by the Greens and parts of the CDU. At the same time SPD-FDP Governments in East Germany fall apart. In Thuringia and in Berlin the SPD forms minority governments backed the PDS.
[4] The Genscher government collapses after disputes over nuclear power and a series of terrorist attacks in Berlin and Munich provokes a wave of nativist sentiment. The Social Democrats run on a populistic, moderately Eurosceptical platform in opposition to mass immigration and forms a coalition with the right-wing populist Nationale Volkspartei (National People's Party) that many compare to France's National Front though they are very careful to purge any members with even a hint of neo-Nazi links.
[5] Sarrazin replaced by more "Green friendly" leader to allow formation of coalition. First female Chancellor.
 
1949: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
1953: Kurt Schumacher (SPD)
1957: Kurt Schumacher (SPD)
1958: Erich Ollenhauer (SPD)
1961: Erich Ollenhauer (SPD)
1965: Gerhard Schroder (CDU)
1969: Erhard Eppler (SPD)
1972: Erhard Eppler (SDP-FDP)
1976: Helmut Kohl (CDU-Grüne) [1]
1980: Helmut Kohl (CDU)
1984: Helmut Kohl (CDU)
1988: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-SPD)
1991: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-SPD) [2]
1992: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP minority) [3]
1994: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-Grüne)
1998: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-Grüne)
2001: Thilo Sarrazin (SPD-NVP) [4]
2005: Gesine Schwan (SPD-Grüne) [5]
2009: Gesine Schwan (SPD-Grüne)
2012: Gesine Schwan (SPD-PDS) [6]


[1]
After a nuclear incident in the USSR the newly formed Greens gains massive in popularity. The CDU opposition promises environmental reforms and forms a coalition with the Green Party.
[2] First all-German election since 1938.
[3] After reunification the FDP-SPD coalition falls apart due to disagreements in fiscal and foreign policy. The SPD argued for increased taxes on rich people to pay to reunification. In addition left wing SPD members pressured the Government to leave Nato and called it a relict of the Cold War. After Genscher loses a Vote of no confidence in 1992 new elections are held place. While the FDP becomes the the strongest party in the parliament, Genscher fails to get an absolute majority. The SPD refuses any cooperation with Genscher and the CDU is too divided to form a coalition. The nationalist wing still blames Genscher for accepting the Oder-Neiße border. After weeks of political crisis Genscher forms a minority government backed by the Greens and parts of the CDU. At the same time SPD-FDP Governments in East Germany fall apart. In Thuringia and in Berlin the SPD forms minority governments backed the PDS.
[4] The Genscher government collapses after disputes over nuclear power and a series of terrorist attacks in Berlin and Munich provokes a wave of nativist sentiment. The Social Democrats run on a populistic, moderately Eurosceptical platform in opposition to mass immigration and forms a coalition with the right-wing populist Nationale Volkspartei (National People's Party) that many compare to France's National Front though they are very careful to purge any members with even a hint of neo-Nazi links.
[5] Sarrazin replaced by more "Green friendly" leader to allow formation of coalition. First female Chancellor.
[6] The Whistleblower and former NSA member Edward Snowden reveals that US intelligence agencies were spying on the German Population. Even Chancellor Schwan was revealed to be a target. After a snap election the populist PDS massively gains in popularity, while the traditional pro western parties like the Greens and the FDP lose in popularity. The SPD remains the strongest party and forms a coalition with PDS.
 
1949: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
1953: Kurt Schumacher (SPD)
1957: Kurt Schumacher (SPD)
1958: Erich Ollenhauer (SPD)
1961: Erich Ollenhauer (SPD)
1965: Gerhard Schroder (CDU)
1969: Erhard Eppler (SPD)
1972: Erhard Eppler (SDP-FDP)
1976: Helmut Kohl (CDU-Grüne) [1]
1980: Helmut Kohl (CDU)
1984: Helmut Kohl (CDU)
1988: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-SPD)
1991: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-SPD) [2]
1992: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP minority) [3]
1994: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-Grüne)
1998: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-Grüne)
2001: Thilo Sarrazin (SPD-NVP) [4]
2005: Gesine Schwan (SPD-Grüne) [5]
2009: Gesine Schwan (SPD-Grüne)
2012: Gesine Schwan (SPD-PDS) [6]
2016: Karl-Theodor Maria Nikolaus Johann Jacob Philipp Franz Joseph Sylvester Buhl-Freiherr von und zu Guttenberg (CSU-CDU-Grüne-FDP)

[1]
After a nuclear incident in the USSR the newly formed Greens gains massive in popularity. The CDU opposition promises environmental reforms and forms a coalition with the Green Party.
[2] First all-German election since 1938.
[3] After reunification the FDP-SPD coalition falls apart due to disagreements in fiscal and foreign policy. The SPD argued for increased taxes on rich people to pay to reunification. In addition left wing SPD members pressured the Government to leave Nato and called it a relict of the Cold War. After Genscher loses a Vote of no confidence in 1992 new elections are held place. While the FDP becomes the the strongest party in the parliament, Genscher fails to get an absolute majority. The SPD refuses any cooperation with Genscher and the CDU is too divided to form a coalition. The nationalist wing still blames Genscher for accepting the Oder-Neiße border. After weeks of political crisis Genscher forms a minority government backed by the Greens and parts of the CDU. At the same time SPD-FDP Governments in East Germany fall apart. In Thuringia and in Berlin the SPD forms minority governments backed the PDS.
[4] The Genscher government collapses after disputes over nuclear power and a series of terrorist attacks in Berlin and Munich provokes a wave of nativist sentiment. The Social Democrats run on a populistic, moderately Eurosceptical platform in opposition to mass immigration and forms a coalition with the right-wing populist Nationale Volkspartei (National People's Party) that many compare to France's National Front though they are very careful to purge any members with even a hint of neo-Nazi links.
[5] Sarrazin replaced by more "Green friendly" leader to allow formation of coalition. First female Chancellor.
[6] The Whistleblower and former NSA member Edward Snowden reveals that US intelligence agencies were spying on the German Population. Even Chancellor Schwan was revealed to be a target. After a snap election the populist PDS massively gains in popularity, while the traditional pro western parties like the Greens and the FDP lose in popularity. The SPD remains the strongest party and forms a coalition with PDS.
 
After Genscher loses a motion of confidence in 1992 new elections are held place.
FTFY, unless your Germany's constitution is not OTL's Grundgesetz. The distinction is important; Motions of confidence and VONCs both exist in the OTL German system, but only a motion of confidence can trigger a new election, while a VONC is a tool for changing the government coalition without new elections.
 
1949: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
1953: Kurt Schumacher (SPD)
1957: Kurt Schumacher (SPD)
1958: Erich Ollenhauer (SPD)
1961: Erich Ollenhauer (SPD)
1965: Gerhard Schroder (CDU)
1969: Erhard Eppler (SPD)
1972: Erhard Eppler (SDP-FDP)
1976: Helmut Kohl (CDU-Grüne) [1]
1980: Helmut Kohl (CDU)
1984: Helmut Kohl (CDU)
1988: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-SPD)
1991: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-SPD) [2]
1992: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP minority) [3]
1994: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-Grüne)
1998: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-Grüne)
2001: Thilo Sarrazin (SPD-NVP) [4]
2005: Gesine Schwan (SPD-Grüne) [5]
2009: Gesine Schwan (SPD-Grüne)
2012: Gesine Schwan (SPD-PDS) [6]
2016: Karl-Theodor Maria Nikolaus Johann Jacob Philipp Franz Joseph Sylvester Buhl-Freiherr von und zu Guttenberg (CSU-CDU-Grüne-FDP)
2018: David McAllister (FDP-CSU-CDU-Grüne) [7]

[1]
After a nuclear incident in the USSR the newly formed Greens gains massive in popularity. The CDU opposition promises environmental reforms and forms a coalition with the Green Party.
[2] First all-German election since 1938.
[3] After reunification the FDP-SPD coalition falls apart due to disagreements in fiscal and foreign policy. The SPD argued for increased taxes on rich people to pay to reunification. In addition left wing SPD members pressured the Government to leave Nato and called it a relict of the Cold War. After Genscher loses a Vote of no confidence in 1992 new elections are held place. While the FDP becomes the the strongest party in the parliament, Genscher fails to get an absolute majority. The SPD refuses any cooperation with Genscher and the CDU is too divided to form a coalition. The nationalist wing still blames Genscher for accepting the Oder-Neiße border. After weeks of political crisis Genscher forms a minority government backed by the Greens and parts of the CDU. At the same time SPD-FDP Governments in East Germany fall apart. In Thuringia and in Berlin the SPD forms minority governments backed the PDS.
[4] The Genscher government collapses after disputes over nuclear power and a series of terrorist attacks in Berlin and Munich provokes a wave of nativist sentiment. The Social Democrats run on a populistic, moderately Eurosceptical platform in opposition to mass immigration and forms a coalition with the right-wing populist Nationale Volkspartei (National People's Party) that many compare to France's National Front though they are very careful to purge any members with even a hint of neo-Nazi links.
[5] Sarrazin replaced by more "Green friendly" leader to allow formation of coalition. First female Chancellor.
[6] The Whistleblower and former NSA member Edward Snowden reveals that US intelligence agencies were spying on the German Population. Even Chancellor Schwan was revealed to be a target. After a snap election the populist PDS massively gains in popularity, while the traditional pro western parties like the Greens and the FDP lose in popularity. The SPD remains the strongest party and forms a coalition with PDS.
[7]A scandal of misappropriation of public funds directly involving Chancellor zu Guttenberg leads to his resignation. Early elections are called at a time deemed appropriate by the government. The majority is renew, this time with the FDP in the lead.
 
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So new list then?

1969: Kurt Georg Kiesinger CDU [1]

[1]
The CDU manages to eke out a narrow victory over the SPD in the 1969 elections. Brandt is forced to step down as leader of the Social Democrats and Kiesinger prepares to lead the FRG into the next decade...
 
So new list then?

1969: Kurt Georg Kiesinger CDU [1]

[1]
The CDU manages to eke out a narrow victory over the SPD in the 1969 elections. Brandt is forced to step down as leader of the Social Democrats and Kiesinger prepares to lead the FRG into the next decade...
No. The timeline starts in 1945 and ends in 2030.
 
2018: David McAllister (FDP-CSU-CDU-Grüne) [7]


[7
]A scandal of misappropriation of public funds directly involving Chancellor zu Guttenberg leads to his resignation. Early elections are called at a time deemed appropriate by the government. The majority is renew, this time with the FDP in the lead.
With a 4 party government the opposition must be really strong. SPD and PDS seem to be quiet successful.
 
1949: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
1953: Kurt Schumacher (SPD)
1957: Kurt Schumacher (SPD)
1958: Erich Ollenhauer (SPD)
1961: Erich Ollenhauer (SPD)
1965: Gerhard Schroder (CDU)
1969: Erhard Eppler (SPD)
1972: Erhard Eppler (SDP-FDP)
1976: Helmut Kohl (CDU-Grüne) [1]
1980: Helmut Kohl (CDU)
1984: Helmut Kohl (CDU)
1988: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-SPD)
1991: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-SPD) [2]
1992: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP minority) [3]
1994: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-Grüne)
1998: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-Grüne)
2001: Thilo Sarrazin (SPD-NVP) [4]
2005: Gesine Schwan (SPD-Grüne) [5]
2009: Gesine Schwan (SPD-Grüne)
2012: Gesine Schwan (SPD-PDS) [6]
2016: Karl-Theodor Maria Nikolaus Johann Jacob Philipp Franz Joseph Sylvester Buhl-Freiherr von und zu Guttenberg (CSU-CDU-Grüne-FDP)
2018: David McAllister (FDP-CSU-CDU-Grüne) [7]
2022: David McAllister (FDP-CSU-CDU-Grüne) [8]

[1]
After a nuclear incident in the USSR the newly formed Greens gains massive in popularity. The CDU opposition promises environmental reforms and forms a coalition with the Green Party.
[2] First all-German election since 1938.
[3] After reunification the FDP-SPD coalition falls apart due to disagreements in fiscal and foreign policy. The SPD argued for increased taxes on rich people to pay to reunification. In addition left wing SPD members pressured the Government to leave Nato and called it a relict of the Cold War. After Genscher loses a Vote of no confidence in 1992 new elections are held place. While the FDP becomes the the strongest party in the parliament, Genscher fails to get an absolute majority. The SPD refuses any cooperation with Genscher and the CDU is too divided to form a coalition. The nationalist wing still blames Genscher for accepting the Oder-Neiße border. After weeks of political crisis Genscher forms a minority government backed by the Greens and parts of the CDU. At the same time SPD-FDP Governments in East Germany fall apart. In Thuringia and in Berlin the SPD forms minority governments backed the PDS.
[4] The Genscher government collapses after disputes over nuclear power and a series of terrorist attacks in Berlin and Munich provokes a wave of nativist sentiment. The Social Democrats run on a populistic, moderately Eurosceptical platform in opposition to mass immigration and forms a coalition with the right-wing populist Nationale Volkspartei (National People's Party) that many compare to France's National Front though they are very careful to purge any members with even a hint of neo-Nazi links.
[5] Sarrazin replaced by more "Green friendly" leader to allow formation of coalition. First female Chancellor.
[6] The Whistleblower and former NSA member Edward Snowden reveals that US intelligence agencies were spying on the German Population. Even Chancellor Schwan was revealed to be a target. After a snap election the populist PDS massively gains in popularity, while the traditional pro western parties like the Greens and the FDP lose in popularity. The SPD remains the strongest party and forms a coalition with PDS.
[7] A scandal of misappropriation of public funds directly involving Chancellor zu Guttenberg leads to his resignation. Early elections are called at a time deemed appropriate by the government. The majority is renew, this time with the FDP in the lead.
[8] Coalition retained, although strain is beginning to show between the partners.
 
1949: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
1953: Kurt Schumacher (SPD)
1957: Kurt Schumacher (SPD)
1958: Erich Ollenhauer (SPD)
1961: Erich Ollenhauer (SPD)
1965: Gerhard Schroder (CDU)
1969: Erhard Eppler (SPD)
1972: Erhard Eppler (SDP-FDP)
1976: Helmut Kohl (CDU-Grüne) [1]
1980: Helmut Kohl (CDU)
1984: Helmut Kohl (CDU)
1988: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-SPD)
1991: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-SPD) [2]
1992: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP minority) [3]
1994: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-Grüne)
1998: Hans-Dietrich Genscher (FDP-Grüne)
2001: Thilo Sarrazin (SPD-NVP) [4]
2005: Gesine Schwan (SPD-Grüne) [5]
2009: Gesine Schwan (SPD-Grüne)
2012: Gesine Schwan (SPD-PDS) [6]
2016: Karl-Theodor Maria Nikolaus Johann Jacob Philipp Franz Joseph Sylvester Buhl-Freiherr von und zu Guttenberg (CSU-CDU-Grüne-FDP)
2018: David McAllister (FDP-CSU-CDU-Grüne) [7]
2022: David McAllister (FDP-CSU-CDU-Grüne) [8]
2025: Martin Sonneborn (PDS-SPD-CDU-CSU)[9]


[1]
After a nuclear incident in the USSR the newly formed Greens gains massive in popularity. The CDU opposition promises environmental reforms and forms a coalition with the Green Party.
[2] First all-German election since 1938.
[3] After reunification the FDP-SPD coalition falls apart due to disagreements in fiscal and foreign policy. The SPD argued for increased taxes on rich people to pay to reunification. In addition left wing SPD members pressured the Government to leave Nato and called it a relict of the Cold War. After Genscher loses a Vote of no confidence in 1992 new elections are held place. While the FDP becomes the the strongest party in the parliament, Genscher fails to get an absolute majority. The SPD refuses any cooperation with Genscher and the CDU is too divided to form a coalition. The nationalist wing still blames Genscher for accepting the Oder-Neiße border. After weeks of political crisis Genscher forms a minority government backed by the Greens and parts of the CDU. At the same time SPD-FDP Governments in East Germany fall apart. In Thuringia and in Berlin the SPD forms minority governments backed the PDS.
[4] The Genscher government collapses after disputes over nuclear power and a series of terrorist attacks in Berlin and Munich provokes a wave of nativist sentiment. The Social Democrats run on a populistic, moderately Eurosceptical platform in opposition to mass immigration and forms a coalition with the right-wing populist Nationale Volkspartei (National People's Party) that many compare to France's National Front though they are very careful to purge any members with even a hint of neo-Nazi links.
[5] Sarrazin replaced by more "Green friendly" leader to allow formation of coalition. First female Chancellor.
[6] The Whistleblower and former NSA member Edward Snowden reveals that US intelligence agencies were spying on the German Population. Even Chancellor Schwan was revealed to be a target. After a snap election the populist PDS massively gains in popularity, while the traditional pro western parties like the Greens and the FDP lose in popularity. The SPD remains the strongest party and forms a coalition with PDS.
[7] A scandal of misappropriation of public funds directly involving Chancellor zu Guttenberg leads to his resignation. Early elections are called at a time deemed appropriate by the government. The majority is renew, this time with the FDP in the lead.
[8] Coalition retained, although strain is beginning to show between the partners.
[9] Following the McAllister coalition blowing up over FDP's opposition to rural subsidies and the Greens' climate concerns in agricultural policy, CDU/CSU decides that their voters' interests are better served with a left-populist government.

(IMPORTANT EDIT: Coalition change via VONC, i.e. next elections take place in 2026 as originally scheduled. Well, unless you guys make Sonneborn "lose" a motion of confidence, OTL Kohl '83/Schröder '05 style.)
 
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