List of Alternate Monarchs and Aristocratic Lineage

As an alternative to the Radziwill-Clarence concept, who would you suggest as an alternative? Or keep the same concept bit shift it to Gedeon, Antoni's younger brother with a matching change to Louise's DOB too (swap her and her brothers DOB round?)
Have that Rakozy marriage produce kids and iirc they'd be higher than the Hannovers.
 
I'm curious as to what happens to Kristina of Denmark TTL? Did she wind up married to Henry VIII (the horror!) or did her uncle let her marry the prince d'Orange like she wanted to?
I hadn’t quite decided but I was leaning more towards the Prince of Orange.
 
Isabella I of Castile m. Ferdinand II of Aragon(a)

1a. Isabella II of Castile and Aragon m. Afonso VI of Portugal

1a1a. Ferdinand III of Aragon, Portugal and Castile b. 1493 m. Elizabeth of England b. 1492

2a. Juan, Prince of Asturias d. 1495

3a. Juana of Castile m. Philip II, Holy Roman Emperor

3a2a. Charles of Austria b. 1500

4a. Maria of Aragon m. James IV(a)

4a1a. James V b. 1501

5a. Catherine of Aragon m. Arthur, Prince of Wales b. 1486 d. 1506

5a1a. Henry VIII b. 1502
 
Version 2.0 ...

The new Hanoverian line ...

Ernest Augustus, Elector of Hanover, b. 1629, d. 1698, m. Sophia of the Palatinate
...​
b) Ernest Augustus, Duke of York and Albany, Elector of Hanover, b. 1674, r. 1727 to 1728, m. Luise Dorothea of Prussia​
1) Ludwig, Duke of York and Albany, Elector of Hanover, b. 1700, r. 1728 to 1755, m.​
a)​
1)​
2) Frederick of Hanover, b. 1705, d. 1730, m.​

Ernest does his duty and produces two children, Louise dies roughly as per her OTL timeline death date and the line apparently secure, he declined to remarry. Who might Ludwig and Frederick marry in this position?
 
Version 2.0 ...

The new Hanoverian line ...

Ernest Augustus, Elector of Hanover, b. 1629, d. 1698, m. Sophia of the Palatinate
...​
b) Ernest Augustus, Duke of York and Albany, Elector of Hanover, b. 1674, r. 1727 to 1728, m. Luise Dorothea of Prussia​
1) Ludwig, Duke of York and Albany, Elector of Hanover, b. 1700, r. 1728 to 1755, m.​
a)​
1)​
2) Frederick of Hanover, b. 1705, d. 1730, m.​

Ernest does his duty and produces two children, Louise dies roughly as per her OTL timeline death date and the line apparently secure, he declined to remarry. Who might Ludwig and Frederick marry in this position?
Well, does George II survive here or is this for the tree above where George dies? Heir to Hannover will marry differently to heir whose dad's Bishop of Osnabück and heir to nothing
 
This is for the tree where George II dies, and Sophia becomes Queen. But, at the time of the marriage, Ernest Augustus, would be Heir to neither. By the time the kids marry though, it's probably clear George I won't be yielding male heirs and thus would be Heir to Hanover.
 
A match with one of Sophia's daughters might be considered - if ultimately unsuccessful (Prince Eugen of Savoy and the Austrians played a big role in trying to keep the Hohenzollerns and the Hannoverians at sixes-and-sevens because otherwise it'd be a powerful bloc opposed to the Habsburgs).
 
285. This is the Military Anarchy. The age of the Empire at war. For two hundred years, Rome ruled the world, building great splendors and spreading civilization to the ends of the earth but now the Emperor is gone and his commanders fight over the remainders. Aurelian, once hoped by many to be Caesar reborn, was killed defending Moesia from the Gothic king Cannabaudes in the 270s. The Palmyran Queen Zenobia, following in the footsteps of her predecessor and ancestor Cleopatra, has seized control of Egypt and made herself master of the eastern Mediterranean. Germanic tribes run rampant through Europe. The west is ruled by Gallic emperor Tetricus yet his reign is too plagued by the fragmentation of power by localized authority and barbarians at the gate. Among them are the robber duo Pomponius and Amandus. Glorified bandits from obscure origins, they are deemed enemies of the state due to their plundering of the countryside and with many casualties, are forced to flee to Arvernia after a major defeat against the Gallic army where they imprisoned and executed the provincial elites, or at least not willing to house and pay tribute to the duo's bagaudae army.

Dux Arvernis

Pomponius (285 - 290) [1]
Amandus (290 - 318) [2]
Camulus (318 - 344) [3]
Pomponius II (344 - 356) [4]
Segomarus (356 - 393) [5]
Aridius (393 - 424) [6]
Cornelian (424 - 451) [7]

[1] Pomponius' reign was marked by establishing some sort of government that would efficiently fatten the pockets of Arvernia's new rulers and their bandit army while not completely destroying what made the region rich in the first place. An accord was made where the administrative class, provided that they swear loyalty to Pomponius and Amandus, would be the ones in charge. Further attempts by Tetricus I and his son Tetricus II to reconquer Arvernia would end in failure that the latter resolves to make use of the bandits and formalized an alliance, entrusting Pomponius with that region as its dux provided that they continue paying taxes to Trier. Pomponius ended up marrying the beautiful widow of a prominent Arverni senator that he executed for insulting his mother.

[2] In theory Amandus and Pomponius were equals but the truth was more complicated. While Pomponius started the rebellion, it was Amandus who did much of the leg-work, transforming the bagaudae into a semi-professional force that could match Tetricus' barbarized hordes on an open plain battle. Yet it was Pomponius who received the credit, seen as the de facto ruler by the elites that he helped crush and officialized by the Gallic Emperor himself. Amandus did not mind; he was to be made Pomponius' successor and would receive all the title and glory that would come with it. Or at least that was before the birth of Pomponius' son Camulus in 289. So he did what anyone would do: murder Pomponius and his wife in their sleep and force his former friend's acolytes to exile.

[3] Camulus spends his first years as an exile in Queen Mother Zenobia's court in Alexandria. Mentored by her grandson, the Emperor Julius Antiochus II, he was educated in the literary classics and fashioned into a model warrior. He was crucial in Julius Antiochus' war against Persia, even saving the Emperor's life from being speared to death by a Sassanid cataphract at the battle of Ctesiphon. His story would've ended there if not for a vision he received from his namesake Camulus, the Gallic god of war, commanding him to return home and seize the throne from his father's murderer. So he did what he was told and returned to Arvernia. He rounded up an army and defeated Amandus. While Amandus' followers were spared without harm, the same could not be said for Amandus himself who was castrated. In true eastern fashion, he would become an eunuch and serve Camulus as one of his chief advisors. He would marry Amandus' daughter Elantia and sire many children. His reign would otherwise be peaceful.

[4] Pomponius II had much to live up to being Camulus' eldest son and named after his grandfather, the founder of post-Roman Arvernia. Despite the younger Pomponius being mentored by his father and his council of advisers, there were some who held their doubts about the young prince, especially since he like his mother was a Christian. So he did the antiquarian equivalent of a WASP trust fund baby with a lot to prove: he assumed command and went to war. Towns and cities that refused to surrender and convert to the growing Christian religion were put to the sword and its inhabitants sold to slavery. His conquests and the religious aspect of the war made him enemy number one to Gallic emperor Marius Augustus, a fervent worshipper of Mithras. At the battle of Chalons, Pomponius' smaller army outmaneuvered and wiped out Marius' army. Marius was imprisoned and it seemed that the Christian had destined Pomponius for greater things. Yet it was not meant to be. Before Pomponius would march his army to capture Trier and crown himself Emperor, his younger brother Segomarus, conspiring with the imprisoned emperor Marius, assassinated him and became the new dux.

[5] Segomarus may have been opposed to his brother's Christian faith but he was not opposed to Arvernian expansionism. He released Marius Augustus on the stipulation that the emperor sanctioned his late brother's conquests and demanded that on top of dux, he would be made magister militum. He spent the remainder of his reign subjugating the barbarian tribes that have been settling down in the Gallic empire for the past century and building new settlements along the Rhine frontier, manned with a reformed and modernized Gallic imperial army. He would be succeeded by his grandson Aridius.

[6] Aridius was praised by both historians and contemporaries for his good administration and counseling Gallic emperor Martius. His political enemies, particularly among the Sygarians, attempted to turn the Emperor against him and despite repeated attempts, their plots were foiled. Aridius remained on good terms with the imperial family until 412 when he sought retirement and returned to Arvernia where he expanded the ducal palace and refurbished the temple to Mars.

[7] Cornelian began his reign as a witness to the Hunnic invasions of Europe. Cornelian is best known for his coordinating a military coalition between the Gallic Empire, the Roman Senate and the semi-civilized barbarian kings in Moesia and Greece against the steppe horde. It was ultimately futile as the Hunnic king Rugila thought ahead, sending his scouts to pick apart the different armies one by one, ultimately destroying the remnants led by Duke Cornelian and Emperor Julian at the battle of Aquincum. Thus ended the age of classical antiquity and began the rule of Europe's first khagans.
 
Edward, older son of Black Prince, does not die in 1371. He happens to be more capable than brother and downfall of main line of Plantagenets is avoided.

Edward IV (1364-1425) King of England 1377, m. Joan of Navarre (1370-1437)

1) Joan (1387-1429) m. Martin I (1374-1409) King of Sicily

2) Edward (1389-1393)

3) Philippa (1390-1444) m. Eric of Pomerania (1381-1459) King of Denmark, Norway and Sweden

4) Mary (1392-1455) m. Edward I (1392-1438) King of Portugal

5) Richard (1393)

6) Edward V (1395-1443) King of England 1425, m. Isabella of Portugal (1397-1471)

7) Isabella (1397-1435) m. James I (1394-1437) King of Scotland

8) Blanche (1399)

9) Henry (1401-1460) Duke of Clarence
 
Ferdinand I of Portugal is widowed in 1379 and remarries to Philippa of Lancaster, daughter of his ally John of Gaunt. To further strenghten ties between families it is decided, that Ferdinand's daughter from first marriage would marry Philippa's brother Henry (as she is not heiress anymore after her half brothers are born it is not very problematic to send her to England ITTL)

Ferdinand I (1345-1383) King of Portugal 1367, m. a) Leonor Teles (1350-1379) b) Philippa of Lancaster (1360-1415)

1a) Beatrice (1373-1420) m. Henry IV (1367-1413) King of England

1) Henry (1389-1402)​
2) John II (1391-1436) King of England 1413​
3) Philippa (1392-1440)​

2b) Afonso V (1382-1421) King of Portugal 1383, m. Blanche of Navarre (1387-1441)

1) Ferdinand II (1404-1439) King of Portugal 1421​
2) Afonso (1406-1412)​
3) Philippa (1408-1461)​
4) Charles (1409)​
5) Peter (1410-1467) King of Navarre 1441​

3b) Isabella (1383-1440) m. Martin I (1374-1409) King of Sicily

1) Martin II (1405-1449) King of Sicily 1409, King of Aragon 1410​

4b) Ferdinand (1384-1404) Duke of Coimbra
 
Henry V is only surviving child of his father. Thus he marries much earlier than IOTL and his ATL wife is Catherine of Pomerania, sister of Eric, King of Denmark, Norway and Sweden (who was his brother-in-law also IOTL as husband of his sister Philippa, who does not exist ITTL).

Henry V (1386-1422) King of England 1413, m. Catherine of Pomerania (ca. 1390-1426)

1) Henry VI (1408-1440) King of England 1422, m. Agnes of Burgundy (1407-1476)

1) Catherine (1426-1428)​
2) Henry VII (1428-1456) King of England 1440​
3) Edward IV (1431-1489) King of England 1456 m. Eleanor Beaufort (1431-1501)​
1) Henry (1454-1463)​
2) Edward (1456-1460)​
3) Eleanor (1457-1533)​
4) Edmund I (1459-1511) King of England 1489​
5) Catherine (1461-1531)​
6) Edward (1463)​
7) Agnes (1466-1509)​
4) Philip (1433)​

2) Mary (1409-1411)

3) Margaret (1410-1464) m. Edward I (1391-1438) King of Portugal, has issue

4) Blanche (1411-1456) m. Philip III (1396-1467) Duke of Burgundy

1) Margaret (1427-1469) m. Louis XI (1423-1483) King of France, has issue​
2) Catherine (1428-1499) m. Charles IV (1421-1471) King of Navarre, has issue​
3) Anthony (1430-1432)​
4) Charles (1431-1481) Duke of Burgundy, m. Yolande of France (1434-1478), has issue​
5) Joanna (1433-1485) m. James II (1430-1460) King of Scotland​
1) James (1451-1457)​
2) Alexander IV (1453-1505) King of Scotland 1460, m. Eleanor of England (1457-1533) (see above)​
6) John (1434)​

4) Edward (1413)

5) Catherine (1415-1417)
 
Thomas of Lancaster, Duke of Clarence, has a son (named Humphrey) with Margaret Holland in 1413.

Humphrey (1413-1463) Duke of Clarence 1421, m. Anne Beauchamp (1426-1492)

1) Thomas I (1443-1500) Duke of Clarence 1463, King of England 1473, m. Margaret Lancaster* (1453-1500)

1) Henry (1471-1476)​
2) Thomas II (1474-1526) King of England 1500​
3) Margaret (1478-1480)​
4) Anne (1480-1533)​
5) Catherine (1483-1507)​
2) Henry (1445)

3) Humphrey (1446-1449)

4) Margaret (1450-1513) m. Charles the Bold (1433-1477) Duke of Burgundy

1) Anne (1470-1529)​
2) Isabella (1473-1501)​
3) Charles II (1477-1533) Duke of Burgundy 1477​

5) Anne (1454-1511) m. John II (1455-1495) King of Portugal

1) Joanna (1477-1532)​
2) Afonso VI (1479-1509) King of Portugal 1495​
3) John (1481-1484)​
4) Thomas I (1483-1541) King of Portugal​

6) Edmund (1456)

* Daughter of Henry VI and Margaret of Anjou, female version of Edward of Westminster
 
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Henry V of England (b.1387: d.1422) m Catherine of Valois (b.1401)

Issue:

Henry VI of England (b.1421:d. 1443)

John II of England (b.1421)

--------

John II of England (b.1421:d.1478) m Cecily Neville (b.1425)

Issue:

Henry VII of England (b.1442)

John, Duke of Bedford (b.1444)

Richard, Duke of Clarence (b.1446)

Catherine of England (b.1450)

Cecily of England (b.1453)
 
A timeline where Elizabeth Wydeville is born as the daughter of John Duke of Bedford and Jacquetta of Luxembourg.

John Duke of Bedford (b.1389: d.1437) m Jacquetta of Luxembourg (b.1415)

Issue:

Elizabeth of Bedford (b.1437)

-----------

Elizabeth of Bedford (b.1437) m Edward, Earl of March (b.1443) in 1458.

@isabella
 
John, Duke of Bedford is king and father of kings

English POD: Henry VI dies as infant, his uncle John of Bedford (who happens to have legitimate kids ITTL) succeedes him

John II (1389-1435) King of England 1424, m. a) Anne of Burgundy (1404-1432) b) Eleanor of Navarre (1417-1453)

1a) Henry VII (1426-1472) King of England 1435 m. Eleanor of Portugal (1434-1467)

2a) Anne (1428-1432)

3a) Margaret (1430-1476) m. James II (1430-1460) King of Scotland

4b) John II (1435-1493) King of Navarre 1453, m. Magdalena of France (1443-1495)


Now Navarrese tree (here POD is survival of Charles (b. 1397) son of king Charles III)

Charles IV (1397-1450) King of Navarre 1425, m. Isabella of Portugal (1397-1471)

1) Eleanor I (1417-1453) Queen of Navarre 1450, m. John II of England

2) Blanche (1419)

3) Charles (1421-1437)

4) Joanna (1424)

5) John (1426-1427)

6) Philip (1428-1436)
 
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One where Richard II and Anne of Bohemia manage to have children:

Richard II of England (b.1367: d.1403) m Anne of Bohemia (b.1366: d.1400)

Issue:

Edward, Prince of Wales (b.1385: d.1397)

Richard III of England (b.1386)

Joan of England (b.1390)
 
A timeline where Elizabeth Wydeville is born as the daughter of John Duke of Bedford and Jacquetta of Luxembourg.

John Duke of Bedford (b.1389: d.1437) m Jacquetta of Luxembourg (b.1415)

Issue:

Elizabeth of Bedford (b.1437)

-----------

Elizabeth of Bedford (b.1437) m Edward, Earl of March (b.1443) in 1458.

@isabella
I think I had done an expended version of it some time ago...
 
(forgot to upload this for 5 days good one there brain )

the kings of hispania of my timeline

1) askel I ( 695 - 752) ( established as king in 711) , younger son of the second berber emperor Aderfi I and younger brother of Gwafa , favorite of his grandmother and told how special he was , due to this he did not want to live in the shadow of his brother so in 711 he and tariq attacked hispania , he used his political inteligence and used the politcal divsion to bribe the visgothic nobles to join him and made the conquest easier and the battles as well , and made himself king of hispania but vassal to his father and to the great berber empire.

raided deep in to frankia until his defeat in 730s , fougth against his brother and won the civil war , under his rule the great library and cathedral of toledo where built.

2) askel II (720 -759) oldest son of Askel I , fougth against the franks in his rule and repeled them , but in 759 died in battle against them

3) Iken (744 - 778) after the death of his father he had to give up , septemenia to the franks and he Concentrated on internal afairs by the end of his rule , hispania was semented as the most wealthy "province" of the great berber empire

4) Tariq ( 769 - 811 ) named after Askel I general , the first chalcedonian king after the invasion , he continued to improve the wealth in the time of peace
but began to worry about the southern berbers as pointed out the writtings of idder (a berber traveler) hispania had begun to changed for example the language of hispania and the rest of the berber empire where diverging as well as their culture and religion , so much so that idder and his men where spies sent by the berber emperor when they entered his court ,here idder also pointed out how both courts were different

5) Askel III ( 794 - timeline still ongoing) helping his uncle Gwafa II the berber emperor also ie the berber hannibal against the romans and conquered the belaric islands from them
also helped sent help to the attacks of sicily and other mediterrenian islands
 
I think you had yes, the one query I habe is would this marriage be arranged during York’s protectorate?
Absolutely. No way who York will not take the Lancastrian princess for his son... likely the wedding would be celebrated at the moment and consummated later
 
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