List of Alternate Monarchs and Aristocratic Lineage

Henry VIII has mumps

Catherine of Aragon m. Manuel I of Portugal(c)
1c. Infante Manuel b. 1518
2c. Infanta Maria b. 1521

Henry VIII m. Catherine of Aragon ann. 1516(a) Beatrice of Portugal ann.1533(b) Anne Boleyn div. 1536(c) Kathryn Parr(d)
 
Eleanor of Portugal m. Frederick III of Austria

1a. Christopher of Austria, King of Bohemia b. 1456 m. Margaret of Thuringia

2a. Edward, Duke of Burgundy b. 1459 m. Mary of Burgundy b. 1457[1]

3a. Eleanor b. 1460 m. John II of Portugal

4a. Kunigunde b. 1466 m. Edward V

5a. John b. 1466

1. Her first son survives so Frederick III and Eleanor do not name their son and daughter after saints.
 
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Scenario: Daughter of Richard II of England.

Richard II, King of England (b.1367: d.1400) m. Anne, Princess of Bohemia (b.1366: d.1394) (a), Isabella, Princess of France (b.1389: d.1409) (b)

1a) Philippa, Princess of England (b.1388: d.1462) [1] m. Henry V, King of England and France (b.1386: d.1428) (a) [2]​
1a) Joan, Princess of England and France (b.1406: d.1489) m. John Holland, Duke of Exeter (b.1395: d.1447) (a) -annulled 1440- Ralph Neville, Earl of Westmorland (b.1406: d.1484) (b) [3]​
1a) Elizabeth Holland (b.1425)​
2a) Tiffany Holland (b.1427)​
3b) Edward Neville, Earl of Westmorland (b.1444)​
2a) Henry, Prince of Wales (b.1408: d.1415)​
3a) Anne of Wales (b.1409: d.1419)​
4a) Edward IV, King of England and France (b.1412: d.1450) m. Marie of Armagnac (b.1420: d.1473) (a) [4]​
1a) Mary, Princess of England and France (b.1439)​
2a) Henry, Prince of Wales and Dauphin of France (b.1440: d.1447)​
3a) Philippa, Princess of England and France (b.1443)​
4a) Thomas I, King of England, King of France -until 1452- (b.1445)​
5a) Bernard, Duke of Bedford (b.1448: d.1449)​
5a) Stillborn Son (c.1413)​
6a) Alice, Princess of England and France (b.1415: d.1438) m. Francis I, Duke of Brittany (b.1414: d.1450) (a) [5]​
1a) Isabella of Brittany (b.1436)​
2a) John of Brittany, Count of Montfort (b.1437: d.1449)​
7a) Richard, Duke of Clarence and Milan (b.1417: d.1448) m. Philippa, Infanta of Portugal (b.1432: d.1444) (a), Bianca Maria Visconti (b.1425: d.1468) (b) [6]​
1a) Maria Isabella of Milan (b.1445: d.1446)​
2a) Filippo, Duke of Milan (b.1446)​
3a) Bianca of Milan (b.1448)​
8a) Catherine, Princess of England and France (b.1422: d.1461) m. Frederick III, Holy Roman Emperor (b.1415: d.1493) (a) [7]​
- had no children
9a) Margaret, Princess of England and France (b.1423: d.1503) m. Louis XI, King of France (b.1423: d.1483) (a) [8]​
1a) Peter I, King of France (b.1452)​
2a) Stillborn Son (c.1455)​
3a) Anne, Princess of France (b.1456)​

[1] Philippa of England, the only daughter of Richard II of England and his first wife, Anne of Bohemia, only a catch in the dynastic sense. Very tall, very slim, and very pale, she was often described as a ghostly figure by those who failed to understand her lack of worry concerning her looks. What Philippa understood, however, was power. And family. Thus, when her father was deposed and eventually killed by the Lancastrians, she saw her life going in a completely different direction than initially anticipated. Originally proposed as a match for Louis II of Anjou (and, for a brief moment, the Earl of March), she found herself as a second choice for the new Prince of Wales, and agreed to marry her cousin in 1404, after negotiations had failed for him to marry Isabella of France, her father's child widow.
[2] Henry V of England's campaign in France succeeded in 1421, when he successfully negotiated to become Charles VI's heir, in place of his son. The next few years, however, were difficult for him. Illness began to take hold in the early days of 1422, although his wife would bring nurses from England that successfully prevented his death. But by 1425 he was consistently bedridden, and in 1428 died blind and screaming. His widow hid his death for 15 days, until their eldest son arrived to the city, and the young Edward, Prince of Wales was crowned King of England and France shortly after. His rule would remain challenged.
[3] Joan of England, eldest daughter of Henry V and Philippa of England, was her father's favourite child, and painfully spoiled. Unhappy in her marriage to the Duke of Exeter, she separated from him in 1435 and by 1440 secured an annulment from the Pope. The Princess, young, rich and independent, took on a string of lovers (allegedly), only to marry the widower Earl of Westmorland and have her brother settle the Neville-Neville dispute in his favour in 1444, after falling pregnant. She rarely saw her daughters from her first marriage, but doted on her son. Her first husband married again to a daughter of the Duke of York and became a figure of worry to the Lancastrian regime.
[4] Marie of Armagnac's marriage to Edward IV of England and France was a success on the political front for the Queen Dowager, who struggled through the 1430s to establish herself as a figure in politics. While the Duke of Bedford led the Regency until 1430, her son did look to his domineering mother for guidance, and in 1432, after Bedford's attempt to secure a Breton match for the King failed (largely due to his disinterest in the concept and the bride in question), Philippa managed to successfully break the Armagnac's interest in the Valois succession with a marriage alliance. Marie, on top of her beauty, proved to be a very submissive bride, and the Queen Dowager used her regularly as a smokescreen for her own activities.
[5] Despite the failed attempts to marry the King to a Breton bride, all parties knew Brittany was a key alliance in securing the French throne. Thus, in 1434, the Princess Alice, aged 19, married the Count of Montfort and future Duke of Brittany. The marriage was relatively happy until her death at 23, and only Alice's daughter Isabella would survive to adulthood.
[6] Richard, Duke of Clarence was an ambitious young man. Convinced he needed his own, separate, seat of power, he leveraged his fortune for an army in 1443, shortly after wedding the Infanta Philippa of Portugal (a niece to the King of Portugal) he fought and pushed back Francesco Sforza from Milan, eventually killing him in battle. When news arrived his bride had died in his mother's care, Richard went even further to secure his position and married the widowed Dowager Duchess of Milan, Bianca Maria Visconti, who had an (illegitimate) claim to the Duchy by her father. The Pope spoke against Richard's cruelty, with rumours he had forced his marriage upon Bianca, and it's assumed she had him killed in 1448 when he was stabbed to death while hunting. She later remarried to her first husband's brother, but maintained the rights of her children by Richard.
[7] Catherine, the first of two daughters born to Henry V as King of both England and France, was married to the Holy Roman Emperor Frederick III in 1443, while he was King of the Romans. Catherine, the most beautiful of the English Princesses, proved sterile, and regularly left her husband's side for pilgrimages to remedy the issue. It's like the 1461 pregnancy that she allegedly had was ovarian cancer, as she died later that year. She was her mother's favourite child, and it's said that Philippa of England's suddenly decline in health was a direct response to losing her daughter.
[8] The Princess Margaret was the shrewdest of Philippa's daughters, and her least favourite child by far. She rarely spent time in England, and until her marriage in 1451, never considered an alliance. Left alone through most of her youth, she was the first to see the writing on the wall in 1450 when her brother died. France had been unstable since Richard of Clarence's Milanese Invasion had upset the Pope and given the Valois ammunition, the Duke of York in England was getting ideas, and she knew she needed to diffuse a bomb (and maybe get a crown). Thus, in 1451, she eloped with the widower Louis XI of France, and acted as a diplomat for him with her own mother, to release the crown of France with minimal bloodshed, so that England could be secured and most of the Plantagenet possessions across the sea were secured. Most saw her move as a direct betrayal of her country, and in many ways it was. But Margaret knew France was unlikely to be held by a child King with no close male relatives. So, she solved it and made herself Queen instead.
 
Scenario: Daughter of Richard II of England.

Richard II, King of England (b.1367: d.1400) m. Anne, Princess of Bohemia (b.1366: d.1394) (a), Isabella, Princess of France (b.1389: d.1409) (b)

1a) Philippa, Princess of England (b.1388: d.1462) [1] m. Henry V, King of England and France (b.1386: d.1428) (a) [2]​
1a) Joan, Princess of England and France (b.1406: d.1489) m. John Holland, Duke of Exeter (b.1395: d.1447) (a) -annulled 1440- Ralph Neville, Earl of Westmorland (b.1406: d.1484) (b) [3]​
1a) Elizabeth Holland (b.1425)​
2a) Tiffany Holland (b.1427)​
3b) Edward Neville, Earl of Westmorland (b.1444)​
2a) Henry, Prince of Wales (b.1408: d.1415)​
3a) Anne of Wales (b.1409: d.1419)​
4a) Edward IV, King of England and France (b.1412: d.1450) m. Marie of Armagnac (b.1420: d.1473) (a) [4]​
1a) Mary, Princess of England and France (b.1439)​
2a) Henry, Prince of Wales and Dauphin of France (b.1440: d.1447)​
3a) Philippa, Princess of England and France (b.1443)​
4a) Thomas I, King of England, King of France -until 1452- (b.1445)​
5a) Bernard, Duke of Bedford (b.1448: d.1449)​
5a) Stillborn Son (c.1413)​
6a) Alice, Princess of England and France (b.1415: d.1438) m. Francis I, Duke of Brittany (b.1414: d.1450) (a) [5]​
1a) Isabella of Brittany (b.1436)​
2a) John of Brittany, Count of Montfort (b.1437: d.1449)​
7a) Richard, Duke of Clarence and Milan (b.1417: d.1448) m. Philippa, Infanta of Portugal (b.1432: d.1444) (a), Bianca Maria Visconti (b.1425: d.1468) (b) [6]​
1a) Maria Isabella of Milan (b.1445: d.1446)​
2a) Filippo, Duke of Milan (b.1446)​
3a) Bianca of Milan (b.1448)​
8a) Catherine, Princess of England and France (b.1422: d.1461) m. Frederick III, Holy Roman Emperor (b.1415: d.1493) (a) [7]​
- had no children
9a) Margaret, Princess of England and France (b.1423: d.1503) m. Louis XI, King of France (b.1423: d.1483) (a) [8]​
1a) Peter I, King of France (b.1452)​
2a) Stillborn Son (c.1455)​
3a) Anne, Princess of France (b.1456)​

[1] Philippa of England, the only daughter of Richard II of England and his first wife, Anne of Bohemia, only a catch in the dynastic sense. Very tall, very slim, and very pale, she was often described as a ghostly figure by those who failed to understand her lack of worry concerning her looks. What Philippa understood, however, was power. And family. Thus, when her father was deposed and eventually killed by the Lancastrians, she saw her life going in a completely different direction than initially anticipated. Originally proposed as a match for Louis II of Anjou (and, for a brief moment, the Earl of March), she found herself as a second choice for the new Prince of Wales, and agreed to marry her cousin in 1404, after negotiations had failed for him to marry Isabella of France, her father's child widow.
[2] Henry V of England's campaign in France succeeded in 1421, when he successfully negotiated to become Charles VI's heir, in place of his son. The next few years, however, were difficult for him. Illness began to take hold in the early days of 1422, although his wife would bring nurses from England that successfully prevented his death. But by 1425 he was consistently bedridden, and in 1428 died blind and screaming. His widow hid his death for 15 days, until their eldest son arrived to the city, and the young Edward, Prince of Wales was crowned King of England and France shortly after. His rule would remain challenged.
[3] Joan of England, eldest daughter of Henry V and Philippa of England, was her father's favourite child, and painfully spoiled. Unhappy in her marriage to the Duke of Exeter, she separated from him in 1435 and by 1440 secured an annulment from the Pope. The Princess, young, rich and independent, took on a string of lovers (allegedly), only to marry the widower Earl of Westmorland and have her brother settle the Neville-Neville dispute in his favour in 1444, after falling pregnant. She rarely saw her daughters from her first marriage, but doted on her son. Her first husband married again to a daughter of the Duke of York and became a figure of worry to the Lancastrian regime.
[4] Marie of Armagnac's marriage to Edward IV of England and France was a success on the political front for the Queen Dowager, who struggled through the 1430s to establish herself as a figure in politics. While the Duke of Bedford led the Regency until 1430, her son did look to his domineering mother for guidance, and in 1432, after Bedford's attempt to secure a Breton match for the King failed (largely due to his disinterest in the concept and the bride in question), Philippa managed to successfully break the Armagnac's interest in the Valois succession with a marriage alliance. Marie, on top of her beauty, proved to be a very submissive bride, and the Queen Dowager used her regularly as a smokescreen for her own activities.
[5] Despite the failed attempts to marry the King to a Breton bride, all parties knew Brittany was a key alliance in securing the French throne. Thus, in 1434, the Princess Alice, aged 19, married the Count of Montfort and future Duke of Brittany. The marriage was relatively happy until her death at 23, and only Alice's daughter Isabella would survive to adulthood.
[6] Richard, Duke of Clarence was an ambitious young man. Convinced he needed his own, separate, seat of power, he leveraged his fortune for an army in 1443, shortly after wedding the Infanta Philippa of Portugal (a niece to the King of Portugal) he fought and pushed back Francesco Sforza from Milan, eventually killing him in battle. When news arrived his bride had died in his mother's care, Richard went even further to secure his position and married the widowed Dowager Duchess of Milan, Bianca Maria Visconti, who had an (illegitimate) claim to the Duchy by her father. The Pope spoke against Richard's cruelty, with rumours he had forced his marriage upon Bianca, and it's assumed she had him killed in 1448 when he was stabbed to death while hunting. She later remarried to her first husband's brother, but maintained the rights of her children by Richard.
[7] Catherine, the first of two daughters born to Henry V as King of both England and France, was married to the Holy Roman Emperor Frederick III in 1443, while he was King of the Romans. Catherine, the most beautiful of the English Princesses, proved sterile, and regularly left her husband's side for pilgrimages to remedy the issue. It's like the 1461 pregnancy that she allegedly had was ovarian cancer, as she died later that year. She was her mother's favourite child, and it's said that Philippa of England's suddenly decline in health was a direct response to losing her daughter.
[8] The Princess Margaret was the shrewdest of Philippa's daughters, and her least favourite child by far. She rarely spent time in England, and until her marriage in 1451, never considered an alliance. Left alone through most of her youth, she was the first to see the writing on the wall in 1450 when her brother died. France had been unstable since Richard of Clarence's Milanese Invasion had upset the Pope and given the Valois ammunition, the Duke of York in England was getting ideas, and she knew she needed to diffuse a bomb (and maybe get a crown). Thus, in 1451, she eloped with the widower Louis XI of France, and acted as a diplomat for him with her own mother, to release the crown of France with minimal bloodshed, so that England could be secured and most of the Plantagenet possessions across the sea were secured. Most saw her move as a direct betrayal of her country, and in many ways it was. But Margaret knew France was unlikely to be held by a child King with no close male relatives. So, she solved it and made herself Queen instead.
Interesting alternate family tree, say what about Henry V's Brothers ITTL?
 
King Richard III of England (1452-1505) M. Cecily Bonville (1460-1528) [1], had issue

1. King Edward V of England (1476-1528) M. Joanna of Aragon (1479-1555) [2], had issue

1. King Richard IV of England (1498-1548) M. Infanta Isabella of Portugal (1500-1559) [3]
2. Prince Edward, Duke of Cambridge (1500-1557) M. Elizabet Grey, Viscountess Lisle (1505-1555)
3. Princess Cecily of England (1502-1559) M. King John IV of Spain (1498-1540) [4]
4. Princess Joan of England (1504-1560) M. King James V of Scotland (1496-1546) [5]

2. Princess Cecily of England (1478-1530) M. Holy Roman Emperor Philip II (1478-1524) [6], had issue

1. Holy Roman Emperor Charles V (1499-1559) M. Princess Marguerite of France (1498-1548) [7]
2. Archduchess Mary of Austria (1501-1558) M. King Sigismund I of Poland (1467-1548)
3. Archduchess Cecily of Austria (1501-1554) M. King John III of Denmark (1504-1558)
4. Archduke Maximilian of Austria (1501-1556) M. Anne of Bohemia (1503-1554)

3. Prince Edmund, Duke of York (1479-1510) M. Anne, Duchess of Brittany (1478-1515) [8], had issue

1. Richard, Duke of Brittany (1499-1545) M. Princess Charlotte of France (1500-1555)
2. Edmund, Duke of York (1502-1557) M. Anne Boleyn (1507-1557) [9]

4. Princess Anne of England (1482-1503) M. King Christian II of Denmark (1481-1554) [10], had issue

1. King John III of Denmark (1503-1558) M. Archduchess Cecily of Austria (1501-1554)

...

[1] Anne Neville dies in 1471 giving birth to her and Edward's posthumous and stillborn daughter.
[2] Richard III wants Lancastrian blood to strengthen his son's claim.
[3] Alt daughter of Isabella of Castile and Manuel of Portugal
[4] Alt son of John, Prince of Asturias and Giovanna of Naples
[5] Alt son of James IV and Anne de la Pole
[6] OTL, Philip of Burgundy
[7] Alt daughter of Charles VIII and Margaret, Charlotte is her sister
[8] Marriage occurs due to Richard not wanting Brittany to fall into Frances' hands.
[9] He has Tudor Level love match skills
[10] I know John of Asturias is likelier, but I wanted him to marry Giovanna, so shh.
 
Philip II, Father of queens.

Philip II of Spain (1527-1598) m. A) Maria Manuela of Portugal (1527-1548), B) Mary I of England (1516-1558), C) Elisabeth of France (1545-1567), D) Anna of Austria (1549-1591)
  1. A) Carlos, Prince of Asturias (1545-1568)
  2. A) Isabel I of Portugal (1548-1593) m. A) Archduke Ferdinand of Austria (1551-1572) [1], B) Duarte II of Portugal (1540-1601) [2]
    1. A) Maria (1568-1571)
    2. A) Anna (1570-1635) m. Matthias, Holy Roman Emperor (1557-1619)
    3. B) Duarte III of Portugal (1579-1643) m. Louise of France (1579-1639) [3]
    4. B) Isabel (1580-1641) m. Edward VII of England (1578-1644)
    5. B) João (1582)
    6. B) Sebastião, Duke of Guimarães (1583-1587)
    7. B) Carlos, Duke of Viseu (1585-1619) m. Margherita Gonzaga (1591-1632)
    8. B) Joana (1586-1642) m. Felipe IV of Spain (1584-1633)
  3. B) Catherine, Queen of England and Lady of the Netherlands(1555-1612) m. Archduke Ernest of Austria (1553-1595)
    1. Philip, Prince of Wales (1573-1588)
    2. Mary (1574)
    3. Joan (1576-1579)
    4. Edward VII of England (1578-1644) m. Isabel of Portugal (1580-1641)
    5. Ernest, Duke of Richmond and Governor of the Netherlands (1579-1635) m. Countess Charlotte of Nassau (1580-1631)
    6. Margaret (1582-1621) m. Charles I of Scotland (1585-1643)
    7. Elizabeth (1582-1583)
  4. C) Felipe III of Spain(1564-1629) m. Archduchess Margaret of Austria (1567-1633)
    1. Felipe IV of Spain (1584-1633) m. Joana of Portugal (1586-1642)
    2. Stillborn daughter (1584)
    3. Carlos Fernando (1587-1589)
    4. Isabel Eugenia (1589-1651) m. Ferdinand II, Holy Roman Emperor (1590-1647) [4]
    5. Alfonso Pedro, Duke of Milan (1590-1667) m. Isabella of Milan (1592-1669)
    6. Stillborn son (1592)
    7. María Margarita (1595-1598)
    8. Juan Carlos (1597-1598)
    9. Ana Claudia (1600-1675) m. Sebastião II of Portugal (1599-1671) [5]
  5. C) María Eugenia (1566-1579)
  6. C) Juana Micaela(1567-1597) m. James VI of Scotland (1565-1628) [6]
    1. Charles II of Scotland (1585-1643) m. A) Margaret of England (1582-1621), B) Henrietta of Orleans (1605-1668) [7]
    2. Robert (1587)
    3. Mary (1589-1656) m. François III of France (1575-1619) [8]
    4. Elizabeth (1591-1593)
    5. Philip, Duke of Albany (1594-1600)
    6. Joan (1597-1598)
  7. D) Fernando, Duke of Milan(1570-1626) m. Anna of Savoy (1571-1622) [9]
    1. Filippo (1590-1592)
    2. Isabella (1592-1669) m. Alfonso Pedro, Duke of Milan (1590-1667)
    3. Stillborn son (1594)
    4. Giovanna (1599-1600)
  8. D) Carlos Lorenzo (1572-1573)
  9. D) Juan Maximiliano (1573-1577)
  10. D) Margarita Ana(1575-1604) m. François III of France (1575-1619) [8]
    1. Marie Anne (1594-1598)
    2. Marie Louise (1596-1652) m. Edward VIII of England (1598-1649) [10]
    3. François IV of France (1597-1660) m. Eleanor of Austria (1598-1655) [11]
    4. Stillborn daughter (1599)
    5. Henri, Duke of Anjou (1601-1608)
    6. Elisabeth Christine (1603-1667) m. Władysław IV of Poland (1595-1648)
  11. D) Diego Felix (1578-1584)
  12. D) Leonor Cecilia (1580)
  13. D) Alfonso Claudio, Archbishop of Toledo (1583-1628)
[1] Eldest son of Maximilian II and Maria of Spain, died as a baby OTL.
[2] Infante Duarte, Duke of Guimarães. Lives longer than OTL and marries Isabel after King Sebastian's death to unite the claims.
[3] Daughter of Henry III of France and Louise of Lorraine.
[4] Son of Anna of Austria and Matthias, Holy Roman Emperor.
[5] Son of Duarte III and Louise of France.
[6] Son of Mary, Queen of Scots and Charles, Archduke of Inner Austria.
[7] Granddaughter of Henry III and Louise of Lorraine through their second son Henri, Duke of Orleans.
[8] Eldest son of Henry III and Louise of Lorraine.
[9] Daughter of Emmanuel Philbert, Duke of Savoy and Elizabeth Tudor.
[10] Son of Edward VII of England and Isabel of Portugal.
[11] Daughter of Anna of Austria and Matthias, Holy Roman Emperor.
 
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Eleanor of Portugal m. Frederick III of Austria

1a. Christopher of Austria, King of Bohemia b. 1456 m. Margaret of Thuringia

2a. Edward, Duke of Burgundy b. 1459 m. Mary of Burgundy b. 1457[1]

3a. Eleanor b. 1460 m. John II of Portugal

4a. Kunigunde b. 1466 m. Edward V

5a. John b. 1466

1. Her first son survives so Frederick III and Eleanor do not name their son and daughter after saints.
I was under the impression that Helene of Austria was named after Helena Palaiologina, Queen of Cyprus?
 
Interesting alternate family tree, say what about Henry V's Brothers ITTL?
I mentioned Bedford spending much of his time attempting to maintain influence with a much older nephew in this scenario, while I see Humphrey left to hold things down in England and shortly after Edward IV, basically collapsing from the stress and shock of losing France with a child King. With an older heir for Henry V and their brother surviving a few years longer, neither are as important as OTL but still remain vital parts of the Lancastrian court.
 
I mentioned Bedford spending much of his time attempting to maintain influence with a much older nephew in this scenario, while I see Humphrey left to hold things down in England and shortly after Edward IV, basically collapsing from the stress and shock of losing France with a child King. With an older heir for Henry V and their brother surviving a few years longer, neither are as important as OTL but still remain vital parts of the Lancastrian court.
The biggest problem with this scenario of yours is who princess Philippa would be without doubt Queen Regnant here as her father’s heiress, depriving Bolingbroke and his rebellion of a lot of reason and support. I guess who Henry Bolingbroke can marry the princess now Queen to his son and put them on the throne, trying to rule in their name
 
The biggest problem with this scenario of yours is who princess Philippa would be without doubt Queen Regnant here as her father’s heiress, depriving Bolingbroke and his rebellion of a lot of reason and support. I guess who Henry Bolingbroke can marry the princess now Queen to his son and put them on the throne, trying to rule in their name

From what I understand, England's succession laws were up in the air at this point and it wasn't quite sure if a woman could inherit, or whether her claims simply funnelled down to the next available male heir, as has happened with Matilda. Regardless, the Lancastrian claims were, in part, a usurpation, so here they simply legitimise the coming generation with a marriage to the previous regime.
 
From what I understand, England's succession laws were up in the air at this point and it wasn't quite sure if a woman could inherit, or whether her claims simply funnelled down to the next available male heir, as has happened with Matilda. Regardless, the Lancastrian claims were, in part, a usurpation, so here they simply legitimise the coming generation with a marriage to the previous regime.
The only device against female inheritance used until this moment was specifically aimed to prevent a male line granddaughter of a King to inherit her late’s father place in the succession and unlike Maud or Philippa of Clarence, this Philippa would be her father’s heiress presumptive for all her life.
 
The only device against female inheritance used until this moment was specifically aimed to prevent a male line granddaughter of a King to inherit her late’s father place in the succession and unlike Maud or Philippa of Clarence, this Philippa would be her father’s heiress presumptive for all her life.
Except Matilda was the daughter of the King and still passed over, in part because of her gender. England has no precedent of a Queen Regnant, just that they hold and pass their claims to their children. Obviously this eventually evolved to include women directly within the succession, but in OTL it didn't happen until 1553, when their were literally no obvious, of age male line options that could realistically compete with the female succession. And again, in 1400, the Lancastrians are essentially usurping the throne anyway. Philippa is a key to their holding the throne ATL, but she isn't going to be framed as heir in her own right, because that delegitimises their claims and makes thinks less clear if she fails to produce issue. It's a similar situation with Henry VII and Elizabeth of York, except her husband has an even better claim than the Tudor via Beaufort one.
 
Except Matilda was the daughter of the King and still passed over, in part because of her gender. England has no precedent of a Queen Regnant, just that they hold and pass their claims to their children. Obviously this eventually evolved to include women directly within the succession, but in OTL it didn't happen until 1553, when their were literally no obvious, of age male line options that could realistically compete with the female succession. And again, in 1400, the Lancastrians are essentially usurping the throne anyway. Philippa is a key to their holding the throne ATL, but she isn't going to be framed as heir in her own right, because that delegitimises their claims and makes thinks less clear if she fails to produce issue. It's a similar situation with Henry VII and Elizabeth of York, except her husband has an even better claim than the Tudor via Beaufort one.
You are wrong. Matilda was in a much different situation from this Philippa, whose rights of successions are established for law and secured by the entails of Edward I and also Edward III (who deprived Philippa of Clarence from the chance to inherit her late father‘s place in the succession but non touched the concept of female inheritance). And the main reason for which Matilda was passed over, with a much less established succession, was the fact who the English barons disliked her husband and do not wanted him as King. ATL the Lancastrian uprising will not have the OTL support as Bolingbroke can not say in any way to be the next-in-line (as princess Philippa is clearly her father’s heiress, at least until Queen Isabella give him a son) and is possible also who Richard would marry her to Edward of Norwich (who was likely his chosen heir in OTL) who is unlikely to made the OTL choice in this different situation. If Bolingbroke want try to take the Crown here his only legitimate way is marrying his son to Philippa of England and put them on the Crown as he would be in a much different position than OTL.
 
You are wrong. Matilda was in a much different situation from this Philippa, whose rights of successions are established for law and secured by the entails of Edward I and also Edward III (who deprived Philippa of Clarence from the chance to inherit her late father‘s place in the succession but non touched the concept of female inheritance). And the main reason for which Matilda was passed over, with a much less established succession, was the fact who the English barons disliked her husband and do not wanted him as King. ATL the Lancastrian uprising will not have the OTL support as Bolingbroke can not say in any way to be the next-in-line (as princess Philippa is clearly her father’s heiress, at least until Queen Isabella give him a son) and is possible also who Richard would marry her to Edward of Norwich (who was likely his chosen heir in OTL) who is unlikely to made the OTL choice in this different situation. If Bolingbroke want try to take the Crown here his only legitimate way is marrying his son to Philippa of England and put them on the Crown as he would be in a much different position than OTL.
Again, I point to Elizabeth of York as a clear example of a very similar situation in a similar time to my timeline. I also acknowledged that the Mortimer succession for Philippa would have been considered in the original post. Philippa is a potential heiress to England in 1400, but England had NO precedent for a Queen Regnant. None. They'd all been passed over in favour of men. Regardless of why they had been, legal precedent was that men inherited, even if their mother through which their claim derided from was living.
Bolingbroke is an adult man of military skill who unseated Richard II of England from his throne due to perceived tyranny, who is going to be able to not only hold the throne, but marry the available heiress of his predecessor to his son and heir. There's definitely a version of this where Philippa is not in the hands of the Lancastrians and is upheld as a potential Queen Regnant, but that's not what I wrote. Within the century we're talking about, TWICE were women with claims used to produce heirs, rather than upheld on their own (Margaret Beaufort to Henry VII, and Elizabeth of York to Arthur and then Henry VIII).
This very issue was the root cause of the War of the Roses. The Yorkists held the senior female claim, the Lancastrians the senior male claim, and here, they hold both. I might consider redoing this as a cool early Queen Regnant tree another time, but what I put forward is pretty plausible and in line with everything that occurred OTL in regards to the English succession up until this point and 100 years past it. Philippa has more chance of being Queen Consort than Queen Regnant.

EDIT: Also, Matilda was established as her father's heir, right until the end of his life. The Barons were sworn to her. She was meant to be Queen. Her remarriage was a huge part of that, gaining an ally and producing heirs. The fact it didn't wind up working is more evidence that England was adverse, to put it mildly, to being ruled by a woman. The past is sexist and the succession laws were murky at best.
 
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Scenario: This guy has a son instead of a daughter, and that son is raised in the UK by his aunts. He goes on to serve with distinction in the Royal Air Force. This might be a bit ASB, considering the fact that TTL's Ernest Victor is a bastard, but I've always found the "pet Royals" of Britain (the Tecks and Battenbergs) very interesting. This is also a TL where Edward VIII marries his original sweetheart, Rosemary Millicent Sutherland-Levenson-Gower, and has a child who becomes King Victor I (yea I know he was probably infertile, but oh well). King Victor ITTL marries the daughter of the 1st Earl of Dartford.

Lineage of the Earls of Dartford, Viscount Strathearn from Ernest Victor Cumberland, son of Albert, Duke of Schleswig-Holstein.

(The title having been created in 1924 on the occasion of Sir Ernest Victor’s marriage to the Lady Helena Cambridge, youngest daughter of the 1st Marquess of Cambridge)



Ernest Victor, 1st Earl of Dartford (b. 1900 - d. 1959) m. 1924 to Lady Helena Cambridge, Countess of Dartford (b. 1899 - d. 1969)

1. George Adolphus, 2nd Earl of Dartford (b. 1925 - d. 1989) m. 1944 Lady Iris Mountbatten, Countess of Dartford (b. 1920 - d. 1982)

- George Frederick, 3rd Earl of Dartford, (b. 1959) m. 1988 to Lady Beatrice, Countess of Dartford (b. 1963)

A. John Dartford, Baron Strathearn (b. 1990 ) m. 2018 Lady Anne, Viscountess Strathearn (b. 1994)
- Lady Lousia Dartford (b. 2019)

- Lord Louis Dartford (b. 2019)

B. Lord Henry Dartford (b. 1993), married, has issue

2. Queen Amelia Margaret Louise (b. 1927 - 1946 ) m. 1946 to King Victor I (b. 1921 - d. 1981), had issue
 
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Scenario: A son for Vlasislaus II of Hungary and Beatrice of Naples have a son.

Vladislaus II, King of Hungary, Croatia and Bohemia (b.1456: d.1516) m. Barbara of Brandenburg (b.1364: d.1515) (a) -annulled between 1480 and 1500-, Beatrice, Princess of Naples (b.1457: d.1508) (b) [1], Joanna, Princess of Naples (b.1478: d.1518) (c) [2]

1b) Andrew IV, King of Hungary, Croatia and Bohemia (b.1492: d.1545) m. Elisabeth Corvinus (b.1496: d.1518) (a) [3], Germaine of Foix (b.1488: d.1536) (b) [4]​
1a) Margaret, Princess of Hungary and Bohemia (b.1514: d.1579) m. Filippo II, Duke of Milan (b.1519: d.1565) (a) [5]​
1a) Ferdinand II, Duke of Milan (b.1537)​
2a) Maria of Milan (b.1540: d.1542)​
3a) Isabella of Milan (b.1544: d.1550)​
4a) Charles of Milan (b.1546: d.1547)​
5a) Eleonora of Milan (b.1552)​
2a) Elizabeth, Princess of Hungary and Bohemia (b.1517: d.1517)​
3b) Louis II, King of Hungary, Croatia and Bohemia (b.1520: d.1575) m. Barbara of Brandenburg (b.1527: d.1595) (a) [6]​
1a) Stillborn Son (c.1545)​
2a) Elisabeth, Princess of Hungary and Bohemia (b.1547: d.1550)​
3a) Louis III, King of Hungary and Bohemia (b.1549)​
4a) Stillborn Son (c.1550)​
5a) Charles, Prince of Hungary and Bohemia (b.1553: d.1553)​
6a) Sigismund, Duke of Głogów (b.1555)​
7a) Stillborn Son (c.1557)​
8a) Marie, Princess of Hungary and Bohemia (b.1558: d.1558)​
9a) Albert, Prince of Hungary and Bohemia (b.1560: d.1565)​
10a) Stillborn Son (c.1561)​
11a) Beatrice, Princess of Hungary and Bohemia (b.1564)​
4b) Maria, Princess of Hungary and Bohemia (b.1523: d.1527)​

[1] Married in 1491, Beatrice of Naples falls pregnant by her second husband for the first and only time sometime during the early months of 1492, giving birth to their son on November 30th, and naming him Andrew after St. Andrew the Apostle. The Hungarian King, who had been worried without an heir, was thrilled with a healthy heir, although he became increasingly worried that his wife did not fall pregnant again. But they had a son.
[2] Shortly after the death of his Queen, Vladislaus set about for a third (or, in his count, second) wife, falling upon the niece of the King of Aragon, the widowed Queen of Naples, who had recently been considered as the second wife of Henry Tudor in England. Thrilled with his beautiful wife, he hoped for further children, but saw none in the last years of his life. Joanna was not politically involved, and instead, much of the King's attentions were directed by his son, who worked to begin establishing himself as the future King through action, rather than just by right.
[3] The marriage of Andrew IV of Hungary and Elisabeth Corvinus, the last member of the Hunyadi dynasty, was a marriage his mother had fostered as a means of neutralising the threat that the Corvinus had held against the Jaigellon dynasty she was now mother to. Beatrice of Naples had personally travelled to Italy, where Beatrice de Frangepan, widow of John Corvinus, had travelled with her daughter to try and escape after her son was likely murdered. Offering to broker a marriage between the families, Beatrice brought Elisabeth to Hungary and convinced her husband to the match. Elisabeth, ambitious in her own rights, attempted to have her claims heard in 1516, upon Vladislaus' death, but was hampered by a pregnancy with her second child, and was captured by her husband shortly after. Giving birth to a sickly daughter who died within weeks of birth, Elisabeth languished under house arrest before dying of a lingering infection from childbirth. Her only surviving child, the Princess Margaret, was granted Hunyad Castle.
[4] Andrew of Hungary was interested in a match with the Hapsburgs following the death of his wife, but wanted to marry a woman beautiful enough to maintain his attentions. He was uninterested in the Holy Roman Emperor's sisters due to his perception of their homeliness, in particular refusing a match with the Archduchess Maria, who he described as graceless and horselike. He did, however, accept a match with the widow of Ferdinand II of Aragon, Germaine of Foix, after meeting her in Italy in 1518, attending the wedding of Ferdinand of Austria and Bona Sforza. The Emperor dowered his step-grandmother well, and they would have a son in 1520, securing the dynasty.
[5] Margaret of Hungary was, in short words, a catch. Rich, well connected, an heiress in her own right, she was betrothed in 1516 to Charles of Austria, soon to be Holy Roman Emperor, and in 1519 to the Dauphin of France. Then, in 1524, after the death of Claude of France, her father arranged for her to marry Francis I of France himself, in exchange for their children only being the heirs to Naples. The match was set until Francis was captured by the Hapsburgs, and in annoyance Andrew returned to that alliance, betrothing his daughter to the Filippa of Austria, the son of Ferdinand of Austria and Bona Sforza, who by 1528 was the heir to Milan. Throwing his backing specifically behind Ferdinand for Milan, he saw Margaret married to Filippo in 1533, three days after the groom's 14th birthday and shortly before the Princess' 19th. The marriage would not be consummated until 1535, when the dowry was paid in full. Margaret would only have two surviving children, partially because of the long stretches her husband was fighting to protect their throne in Naples.
[6] Louis of Hungary married Barbara of Brandenburg, eldest daughter of the Elector of Brandenburg, as a way to resolve underlying issues that had occurred when his grandfather had annulled a marriage to a different Barbara of Brandenburg to marry Beatrice of Naples. This was not the obvious choice of the future King, who had been engaged to a Princess of France since 1531, but much of Andrew's policies were built around resolving tensions where possible to prevent further bloodshed. Louis and Barbara were distant in their relationship, with the Queen complaining she often felt more like a broodmare than a bride. After their youngest child, the Princess Beatrice, was born, she bought Hunyad Castle from Margaret of Hungary and settled her own court separate from her husband and her children.
 
There are two PODs to this. 1). Anne Neville lives and gives birth to Richard III’s posthumous son (Richard) in 1486. 2). Elizabeth gives birth to a girl (Margaret), the delivery is hard and leaves her unable to become pregnant again. Henry VII later decides to marry Richard to Margaret to unite the claims and secure his crown:

Queen Margaret I of England (1486-1537) M. King Richard IV of England (1486-1542) [1], had issue

1. King Henry VIII of England (1503-1560) M. Beatrice of Portugal (1504-1559), had issue

1. King Richard V of England (1520-1581) M. Queen Elizabeth I of Scotland (1524-1579)
2. Princess Beatrice of England (1527-1590) M. Holy Roman Emperor Philip II (1525-1598)

2. Princess Elizabeth of England (1505-1555) M. King James V of Scotland (1498-1539) [2], had issue

1. King James VI of England (1521-1540), never married
2. Queen Elizabeth I of Scotland (1524-1579) [3] M. King Richard V of England (1520-1581)

3. Prince Edward, Duke of York (1507-1557) M. Elizabeth Grey, Viscountess Lisle (1505-1559, had issue

1. Henry, Duke of York (1521-1549) M. Lady Mary Howard (1519-1557)
2. Edmund, Earl of Rutland (1525-1579) M. Lady Anne Talbot (1524-1585)

4. Princess Anne of England (1509-1559) M. Holy Roman Emperor Charles V (1500-1558), had issue

1. Holy Roman Emperor Philip II (1525-1598) M. a). Anne, Duchess of Lorraine (1522-1548) [4], b). Princess Beatrice of England (1527–1590)
2. Archduchess Anna of Austria (1527-1575) M. King Miguel II of Iberia (1527-1577)
3. Archduchess Maria of Austria (1530-1567). M. King Maximilian I of Hungary and Bohemia (1527-1576) [5]
4. Archduke Charles of Austria (1533-1550), never married

5. Princess Margaret of England (1511-1547) M. King John III of Iberia (1513-1576) [6], had issue

1. King Miguel II of Iberia (1527-1577) [7] M. Archduchess Anna of Austria (1527-1575)



[1] I wasn’t sure how he’d be numbered so I went with Richard IV for simplicity.
[2] Alt daughter of James IV and Katherine of York.
[3] James V has no surviving brothers and the Albany line dies out as per OTL.
[4] Anne’s brother die young here.
[5] OTL Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian II, here he is only King of Bohemia and Hungary since Charles doesn’t give up the Empire title.
[6] Alt son of Miguel de Paz and Eleanor of Austria
[7] Miguel II’s parents are lucky with children.

I know it’s not the most accurate/plausible tree, but it was a fun idea that hit me (so much so that I might make it into a timeline one day).
 
The Queens take it all!

I know it’s very unlikely, not to say ASB but here it is :
Francis I of France is killed in Marignano in September 1515, leaving a young widow and a newborn daughter.

Butterflies:
The new King of France, Charles IX, gets an annulment from the Pope in 1522 and remarries Claude of France.
Little Elizabeth Tudor dies in 1534.
Catherine of Aragon lives another ten years.
Henry VIII dies in the January 1536 tournament and Anne Boleyn miscarries and dies the same month.

France

Claude of France
, Duchess of Brittany (1499-1540) m. a) Francis I, King of France (1494-1515) b) Charles IX, King of France (1485-1535)
1a) Louise of France, Duchess of Brittany (1515-1562)

England

Henry VIII Tudor
, King of England (1491-1536) m. a) Catherine of Aragon (1485-1546) b) Anne Boleyn (1501-1536) p. c) Elizabeth Blount (1500-1540)
1a) stillborn daughter (1510)
2a) Henry, Duke of Cornwall (1511)
3a) son (1513)
4a) son (1514)
5a) Mary I Tudor, Queen of England (1516-1558)
6a) stillborn daughter (1518)
7c) Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Richmond and Somerset (1519-1536)
8b) Elizabeth Tudor (1533-1534)
9b) miscarriage (1534)
10b) miscarriage (1535)
11b) miscarriage (1536)

I'm unsure who Louise of France, Mary of England and even the repudiated Margaret of Angoulême would marry here.
 
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