Les Années Douces, a very different XXth century

Hi, I'm going to post the two next week's articles. Next post should be 1st of April (I thought of asking a friend but I don't want to bother people ...)

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So Hainan is basically the unofficial "French China" in this world? Nice catch compared to Hong Kong or Macau. I know that Hainan is officially a fully independent nation, but that's not how many will see it.

The Grandrue movement is a nice look into the greater culture of France in this universe, but I would expect a little more overt influence from Vietnam or Africa. Maybe that will happen if we wait a few more decades for the Chancellerie to intermingle more fully.
 
Hi guys, I'm back ^~^ I may need some time to get back to work on this TL, but the exam went great (I think) so there's that out of the way !

So Hainan is basically the unofficial "French China" in this world? Nice catch compared to Hong Kong or Macau. I know that Hainan is officially a fully independent nation, but that's not how many will see it.

The Grandrue movement is a nice look into the greater culture of France in this universe, but I would expect a little more overt influence from Vietnam or Africa. Maybe that will happen if we wait a few more decades for the Chancellerie to intermingle more fully.
It used to be French China, now that it doesn't claim the rest of China, foreign powers are ok with its existence, or don't care enough about it to have an opinion.

Grandrue is mainstream, but it isn't the only movement by far ! And you're right, most people who are interested in Chancellerie cultures un metropolitan France are quite young. Other cultural articles like this one are coming ^^
 
Hi, I'm working on a summary of what happened during the month of February (like a front page recapping the month), but I just made a little something. The composition of the Parlement National, the legislative body of the Fourth Republic, with a tiny description of each party. Feel free to ask questions!

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The SFIO, Section Française de l'Internationale Ouvrière, is a Socialist-Communist party. It used to be the champion of the Socialist cause in France, and was briefly in power 1934, but failed to address the colonial crisis that had already brought the Alliance-Union and Radical-Republican governments down. Since then, their support has melted like snow in summer, losing most of their audience and figureheads to the Réformistes. They support a centralized state with a planned economy, on the contrary of the Réformiste decentralized approach.

Réformistes are the governing party. They are the main figures behind the creation of the Chancellerie and the Fourth Republic, and its original founder, Eugène Grindel, is President since the SFIO government fell in 1934. The party is somewhat of a broad coalition, based on former SFIO members, intellectuals and local figures of the left, but also more unexpected figures like Prime Minister Jacqueline Arthuys, who has made no secret of her monarchist feelings in the past. The current policies are oriented towards a decentralized collectivist approach of the economy, seing the workplace as the basic unit of a society. This party generally trends toward a progressive social policy, having granted women equal rights in 1935, criminalized racist offences in 1938 and depenalized homosexuality in 1941, but struggles to find a cohesive answer on some topics due to the sheer size of the movement.

The Parti Chrétien Démocrate is a fairly recent party, born of the Christian Catholic Church's newfound success in France. It was created by Charles Flory, one of the founders of the Christian Catholic Church of France. The main intellectual of the movement is the world famous Soeur Marie, born Paule de Mulatier, a Carmélite sister inspired by the "Theology of small things" of Thérèse de Lisieux. Contrary to accusations, it doesn't try to reinstate the official link between the State and any form of clergy, and is a strong support to the Réformistes. The only reason why the two parties haven't merged yet is because of reluctance from some of the Réformistes.

The Parti Radical-Républicain is a center-left party, born of a short-lived coalition of the Républicains-Socialistes and the Parti Radical in 1933. It represents social-democracy in a more traditional sense, and doesn't question the existence of private property and conglomerates. There were mixed thoughts about the social policies of the Réformistes at first, but now that they have passed as laws it is out of question for RR themselves to question these new laws. They serve as "arbiters of the Parliament", debating laws depending on their own political agenda rather than on party-based considerations, but have thought of allying with the Alliance Démocratique for the elections of 1944.

The Alliance Démocratique is a coalition of liberal and moderate right, firmly laic. They are often nicknamed the "Lilies", due to the presence of many nobles in the party and the fact that François-Alphonse de Bourbon-Parme, nicknamed "Monsieur Plaisance", has become a figurehead of the Party. They are no longer fierce defenders of the republican form of government, but are nonetheless fiercely attached to the values of freedom, equality and fraternity. They are, in this sense, very similar to the Orléanistes of the XIXth century. They are the intellectual opponents the Réformistes have to deal with in the Parliament, not because of hateful rethorics, but because their critics are often very relevant and sensible.

If the Alliance Démocratique is the intellectual opposition, the Union Conservatrice is the political oppositon in the Parliament. It is a broad coalition that goes from moderate conservatives, who mostly wish to reestablish a more centralized state and a society based on the moralism and corporatism of the early Third Republic. They are also, ironically, much more republican than the Alliance, as they have been reinforced by anti-monarchist former Alliance members. They are still the leading right-wing movement, but have seen their results dwindle due to the overall success of the Réformistes and the greater credibility of the Alliance as a potential government party.
 
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The Stock Exchange went bankrupt? If things are this bad to the US, then it makes sense why the native Americans are getting more aggressive now - they can smell blood in the water.

The Carnation Revolution happens in Portugal decades earlier in this universe? That will have some side effects.

France made their own Catholic Church? Lol, I'm sure the Holy See is absolutely delighted about that.

Finally, I'm glad the apparent queen of Australia is seeing more of their apparent domain.
 
The Stock Exchange went bankrupt? If things are this bad to the US, then it makes sense why the native Americans are getting more aggressive now - they can smell blood in the water.

The Carnation Revolution happens in Portugal decades earlier in this universe? That will have some side effects.

France made their own Catholic Church? Lol, I'm sure the Holy See is absolutely delighted about that.

Finally, I'm glad the apparent queen of Australia is seeing more of their apparent domain.
The Stock Exchange basically died because of nationalisations and businessmen emptying their bank accounts and fleeing to Cuba, Mexico or Canada. The economy isn't doing super well but isn't dying either, the big business machine is broken, but smaller companies are doing way better. But since big business is dead and the government has promised they would improve native standards of living, the Natives are taking their chance while they can.

It's not really the Carnation Revolution. This government is (for now) an imperial absolute monarchy with a Queen promising she'll reinstaure democracy, not a democratic government.

It's actually an amplified version of the https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_Catholic_Church , and yes, the Pius XII is not amused.

Basically Australia is for now a Principality, until it has sufficient self-governance capacity to be made into an independent Kingdom. The only Kingdoms in the British Empire are Britain and Canada, for now. Elizabeth Windsor (our Liz II) is the Princess, and she wishes to attein Queenship by 1950, so actually doing something and living there is a better strategy than staying in Holyrood and dipping madeleines in tea.
 
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Hey, this is something of an indicative map of the territories claimed by Native groups in the Declaration of Lahaina. It is only a proposal, and the government has asked to postpone any decision on this particular issue, which was granted.

It indicates the two new proposed status, added to the already existing "Reservation" status. Of course, even if they aren't displayed on the map, reservations are kept unless displayed as part of a new territorial entity.

In yellow are the Native Territories. They are still partially managed by the Bureau of Indian Affairs, but have a greater degree of self-governement. They abide by Federal Law as states do, and have to get the approval of the Bureau on some points (like economic projects) but have executive power.

In green are the proposed Native States. Their middle-term goal is integration as regular states of the Union, but until then they only abide by Federal Laws on certain domains. They have their own citizenship, which requires a certain engagement in native communities. American citizens are however allowed to participate on a township level. Native States mostly act as unincorporated territories.


The map is more to give a general idea than actual definitive boundaries, both in universe and due to my lack of knowledge on Native American condition in the interwar United States.
 
Le German Empire, feel free to ask absolutely anything. (I'm sorry that rivers aren't showing, but I was conflicted about how to show canals, especially the ones in construction, and I chose a basemap with minority languages to prioritize a culturally correct East Prussian border)

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It's fascinating to see a Germany which is both more progressive but also somewhat more regressive at the same time... Implementing women's right to vote two years later than OTL and replacing the Hohenzollerns with Prince Rupprecht (who narrowly avoided persecution as a war criminal after WW1 IOTL and was pretty antisemitic even during the interwar years) aren't really moments of pride for Germany, but the treatment of Germany's colonies has thankfully improved significantly, though given historical precedent that isn't super difficult and you've of course alluded to the uncertain future of Germany's colonies in the article itself. I also love the detail of the increased presence of West/Central African and Central European cuisines in at the very least Berlin, that really fits well with both the theme of the timeline and the feel Berlin has nowadays.

I do have ~two questions and one minor correction though:
First the correction, which is that it's Sanierungsjahre, not -jähren. "-jähren" is IIRC only used in the context of "verjähren", e.g. when a case's statute of limitations runs out.

And now my two questions:

1) Germany on the national level had a two chambered parliament since its founding (the Reichsrat and the Bundesrat, with the former of course being comprised of proportionally-elected delegates from the various states and the latter being formed from representatives chosen by the state governments (e.g. the monarchs) of the member states. Now the article talks about the Prussian parliamentary system with its infamous Dreiklassenwahlrecht (or three-class franchise), which, as the name implies, only applied to Prussia's Landtag and not the Reichstag, though your wording makes it seem that it applied nationally... Is that so? Or was that system abolished in Prussia in 1929 (and thus 11 years after OTL)? Also, for the record, does Prussia still exist as an entity and, if it does, who "rules" it?

2) How does the Confederation of Thuringia work? If it is still monarchical in nature, which one of the many princes and dukes of that area rules it? Were all the states that were merged into Thuringia included or not (and is Coburg, which shortly after WW1 IOTL joined Bavaria, part of it)?
 
It's fascinating to see a Germany which is both more progressive but also somewhat more regressive at the same time... Implementing women's right to vote two years later than OTL and replacing the Hohenzollerns with Prince Rupprecht (who narrowly avoided persecution as a war criminal after WW1 IOTL and was pretty antisemitic even during the interwar years) aren't really moments of pride for Germany, but the treatment of Germany's colonies has thankfully improved significantly, though given historical precedent that isn't super difficult and you've of course alluded to the uncertain future of Germany's colonies in the article itself. I also love the detail of the increased presence of West/Central African and Central European cuisines in at the very least Berlin, that really fits well with both the theme of the timeline and the feel Berlin has nowadays.

I do have ~two questions and one minor correction though:
First the correction, which is that it's Sanierungsjahre, not -jähren. "-jähren" is IIRC only used in the context of "verjähren", e.g. when a case's statute of limitations runs out.

And now my two questions:

1) Germany on the national level had a two chambered parliament since its founding (the Reichsrat and the Bundesrat, with the former of course being comprised of proportionally-elected delegates from the various states and the latter being formed from representatives chosen by the state governments (e.g. the monarchs) of the member states. Now the article talks about the Prussian parliamentary system with its infamous Dreiklassenwahlrecht (or three-class franchise), which, as the name implies, only applied to Prussia's Landtag and not the Reichstag, though your wording makes it seem that it applied nationally... Is that so? Or was that system abolished in Prussia in 1929 (and thus 11 years after OTL)? Also, for the record, does Prussia still exist as an entity and, if it does, who "rules" it?

2) How does the Confederation of Thuringia work? If it is still monarchical in nature, which one of the many princes and dukes of that area rules it? Were all the states that were merged into Thuringia included or not (and is Coburg, which shortly after WW1 IOTL joined Bavaria, part of it)?
Thank you for the language correction, I'll do change that right after I post this reply :) I always struggle with umlauts in plurals

1) Ow, I thought the "Prussian system" had been forced upon the actual Reichsrat as well. I should've researched this bit more. It'll be corrected too. Thank you for pointing this out ^^ And then, yes, Prussia only stopped the differenciated vote based on class in 1929. The reason for that is similar to the reason why some aspects of Germany feel so backwards compared to the Weimar Republic : the governmental change has been way more progressive. The Years of Renovation have lasted more than a decade, and every aspects have been fought for step by step by reformists. Also the fact that Rupprecht died painfully ITTL was kind of a karmic balancing for his undeserved glory. The Kingdom of Prussia still exists as an entity, but it has lost Brandenburg to the Imperial Government (it basically acts as a royal domain), Rheinland to Prince Eitel Friedrich and Pomerania to Prince Adalbert. The fact that Prussia has lost these territories also partially explain the reason why the Prussian System was only abolished in 1929.

2) Thuringia has a Princely Council, with the monarchs of every state, and the "presidency" of the Confederation changes every year in a pre-established cycle. Legislative elections happen every four year, and the first vote of every new assembly is to choose a new representative to the Bundesrat. It would work perfectly if the Princely Council had the good taste of being purely ceremonial, but it is sadly not, and the executive power being in the hands of mostly unnacountable dukes and princes is not good for stability. The Confederation includes all the small states of the region (including Coburg and Sonderhausen), as well as small enclaves of the Prussian districts of Erfurt and Kassel. The internal borders of the Confederation are mostly ceremonial today.
 
Thank you for the language correction, I'll do change that right after I post this reply :) I always struggle with umlauts in plurals

1) Ow, I thought the "Prussian system" had been forced upon the actual Reichsrat as well. I should've researched this bit more. It'll be corrected too. Thank you for pointing this out ^^ And then, yes, Prussia only stopped the differenciated vote based on class in 1929. The reason for that is similar to the reason why some aspects of Germany feel so backwards compared to the Weimar Republic : the governmental change has been way more progressive. The Years of Renovation have lasted more than a decade, and every aspects have been fought for step by step by reformists. Also the fact that Rupprecht died painfully ITTL was kind of a karmic balancing for his undeserved glory. The Kingdom of Prussia still exists as an entity, but it has lost Brandenburg to the Imperial Government (it basically acts as a royal domain), Rheinland to Prince Eitel Friedrich and Pomerania to Prince Adalbert. The fact that Prussia has lost these territories also partially explain the reason why the Prussian System was only abolished in 1929.

2) Thuringia has a Princely Council, with the monarchs of every state, and the "presidency" of the Confederation changes every year in a pre-established cycle. Legislative elections happen every four year, and the first vote of every new assembly is to choose a new representative to the Bundesrat. It would work perfectly if the Princely Council had the good taste of being purely ceremonial, but it is sadly not, and the executive power being in the hands of mostly unnacountable dukes and princes is not good for stability. The Confederation includes all the small states of the region (including Coburg and Sonderhausen), as well as small enclaves of the Prussian districts of Erfurt and Kassel. The internal borders of the Confederation are mostly ceremonial today.
The historic German electoral systems were weird, so it's not terrible that you thought that and German plurals are weird even for many native speakers FYI, e.g. I recently struggled for a minute to find the proper plural of the word Mundschutz (face mask).

Thuringia sounds like it could work quite well, acting as a mini-Germany within Germany. I like it.

Though just for a rough visualization of Prussia's situation... (I didn't want to use a very cluttered map, so excuse the pre-war map I've picked)



Are the only parts of Prussia still under the control of the Kingdom of Prussia Westphalia (14), Hesse-Nassau (4), Hanover (3), Schleswig-Holstein (6 & 11), Prussian Saxony (10), Silesia (12), and the remnant of Prussia (2 & 13)? Because that bisection of the kingdom by removing Brandenburg from it is honestly a bit jarring.
 
Though just for a rough visualization of Prussia's situation... (I didn't want to use a very cluttered map, so excuse the pre-war map I've picked)



Are the only parts of Prussia still under the control of the Kingdom of Prussia Westphalia (14), Hesse-Nassau (4), Hanover (3), Schleswig-Holstein (6 & 11), Prussian Saxony (10), Silesia (12), and the remnant of Prussia (2 & 13)? Because that bisection of the kingdom by removing Brandenburg from it is honestly a bit jarring.
Ow, I really didn't do my homework well enough about the German Empire... now that I have this under the eyes : Hannover, Nassau and Hesse-Cassel were given back to their pre-unification families; Westphalia and Rhine Province are parts of the Kingdom of Rheinland; Brandenburg, the Province of Saxony, Silesia and the Schleswig-Holstein are the "Royal Domain"; Hesse-Darmstadt was given the leftovers of Hesse; Pomerania used the borders of this map; Prussia got Prussia-per-se and Hohenzollern.
 
Ow, I really didn't do my homework well enough about the German Empire... now that I have this under the eyes : Hannover, Nassau and Hesse-Cassel were given back to their pre-unification families; Westphalia and Rhine Province are parts of the Kingdom of Rheinland; Brandenburg, the Province of Saxony, Silesia and the Schleswig-Holstein are the "Royal Domain"; Hesse-Darmstadt was given the leftovers of Hesse; Pomerania used the borders of this map; Prussia got Prussia-per-se and Hohenzollern.
Okay, that makes a lot of sense, and lowkey reminds me of an OTL interwar proposal of turning Prussia (and smaller North German states) into a "Reichsland", directly under the control of the national/federal government, similar to how England works within the UK after the devolution of Scotland and Wales.
 
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