Laughin' Place: Redefining Disney

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: After 1900' started by HeX, Oct 18, 2018.

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  1. eldandythedoubter Well-Known Member

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    If my love of animation had a physical body, its heart would get the doki doki for these ideas.
     
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  2. HeX Self-Proclaimed Disney Expert

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    So, I'll say now that Sonic still exists. What I said before about most video game franchises from before the fifth generation of gaming still existing is still true, though a few major franchises will be getting some big changes as a result of butterflies.

    Another thing about Sonic is that a lot of the existences of characters famous in the comics or SatAM series hinge on very specific things going down, such as Archie Comics picking up the rights to Sonic, or Sega choosing one studio or another to adapt the blue hedgehog as a cartoon. So... without giving too much away, Sally Acorn and the rest are butterflied.

    Sorry for ruining some childhoods.
     
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  3. Nivek Resident Videogame Expert

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    All of you know Sonic was created by japanese isn't it¡
     
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  4. HonestAbe1809 Abraham Lincoln 2020

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    SatAM happened when the franchise was just Sonic, Tails, and Doctor Robotnik. With Rosey the Rascal aka Amy Rose* just barely introduced and Knuckles a year off. If an animated series happens at the same time then the creators of said series will have to create new characters to fill out the cast. I'd frankly love to brainstorm these characters with you in a conversation.

    *You know what'd be adorable? Rosey and Tails having a puppy love relationship. With Rosey giving him a kiss on the cheek and him going "ew, cooties!" while trying to cover up a blush.
     
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  5. Kalvan Well-Known Member

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    Doesn't have to be Sally,she just needs to be someone more grounded than Amy, more worldly than Elise (she's like Anna in Frozen, if she stayed a static character forever. Actually that's not true. Anna still had more spunk in her little toe than Elise had in her whole body), and more emotionally mature than both.
     
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  6. Kalvan Well-Known Member

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    And your point is?
     
  7. HonestAbe1809 Abraham Lincoln 2020

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    The Archie comics had a decent explanation for why Amy still acts childish despite looking older. And that'd because she literally was a kid who used a magical artifact to ZOLTAR herself older. She acted childish because she still was one mentally.

    I agree on Elise. Elise is what you'd get if you gave Princess Peach a lobotomy.

    And he was designed, practically from stage one, to have Western appeal. There's no reason to assume anything differently if Sega was still American.
     
  8. Nivek Resident Videogame Expert

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    A lot, they could never hire Naka, oshima et al.

    nobody but a few US people read those...at times the sonic fandom is so strentched some niche things... I still defend Sonic Adventure 1 and 2 as the correct step of the franchise but seems did fractured it
     
  9. HeX Self-Proclaimed Disney Expert

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    Hoo boy, do I disagree with that idea. All the Adventure games accomplished was--as you said--fracture the fanbase and shove in things that have no place in a Sonic game. Sonic is all about platforming, exploring, going fast, and keeping that speed up. Three of the six stories in SA1 stay true to that idea, those being that of Sonic, Tails, and Knuckles, while the other half make incredibly stupid changes to the formula. I understand it was the first real game on the Dreamcast, and Sega felt they had to show everything the console could do on that one disc, but man, could you imagine if Nintendo had made a sixth of SM64 a third-person shooter? Preposterous, right? Well that's what Sega did!

    I'm not saying the Adventure games or the E-101 Gamma parts were bad (though most of SA2 is borderline unplayable because mechs), but they were a misstep for the series as a whole. There's a reason why everyone's favorite part of those games are the Sonic segments--it's because they're what we all buy a Sonic game for. And these games also began the trend of shoving as many gimmicks into whatever new Sonic game there is as possible. I'm talking three playable characters at once, Wiimote swordplay, the Werehog, Whisps, parkour, gravity, whatever the hell Sonic Boom is, and nostalgia tripping. All of those have their roots in Big the Cat and Gamma.
     
  10. PNWKing There's Still Hope Out There!

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    I have a thought about Ted Turner: What if he starts his own film studio? Turner Pictures. It doesn't have a classic catalog like he wants, but he can make "modern classics."
    Does Carsey-Werner exist?
     
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  11. Nivek Resident Videogame Expert

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    Curious you complain that part, the only filler one for me was Big(that was trully filler), the rest both Sonic Adventure played well the 3D but that camera was a mess..but started the mess of 'replay everything for the true ending' was a disaster with shadow an sonic 06(and that one was rushed to get it done)
    The last Sonic played that...Was either Colours(a hit) or Lost World(still underrated)
     
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  12. Kalvan Well-Known Member

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    Well, since God has mostly spoken on this matter, here's another cartoon question to ponder:

    Since Fox is dead as soon as Heaven's Gate comes out in theaters, who will win Fox's share of the rights to the Terrytoons characters?
     
  13. HeX Self-Proclaimed Disney Expert

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    I haven't worked out all the details yet, and I don't want to give away a whole ton, but I think Terrytoons will stick with the rest of Fox when the company is bought out. A lot of Fox's holdings will remain intact during the shift. Though nothing's set in stone yet.
     
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  14. TheFaultsofAlts Well-Known Member

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    My guess would be either Universal, with hopes to turn Mighty Mouse into their second-greatest cartoon star(after Woody Woodpecker), or Warner Bros., possibly to integrate him into the Looney Tunes franchise.

    Again, this is all just HeX's call, but I thought I could throw in my two cents, as well as my reasons as to how and why.
     
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  15. Kalvan Well-Known Member

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    Well, technically, Terrytoons at the time was a three way joint venture between Fox, Columbia, and Gulf+Western. OTL, Fox, after the failure of The New Adventures of Mighty Mouse, sold the physical animation studios to DIC, and its share of the characters' to Sony. That's right: the PlayStation folks own 2/3 of Heckle and Jekyll, and Viacom owns the rest.
     
  16. Nivek Resident Videogame Expert

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    IIRC all is not owned by CBS only? when Sony got it?

    Umm maybe turner?
     
  17. TheFaultsofAlts Well-Known Member

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    So, what you're saying is that, if given the opportunity, the world would have been treated to a Mighty Mouse film by Sony Pictures Animation, followed by a Nickelodeon tie-in cartoon series shortly after? Man, would THAT have been good or what?
     
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  18. Kalvan Well-Known Member

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    When Sony bought Columbia Pictures from Coke in 1989.

    However, that only gains Sony the rights to 2/3 the gross of any new Terrytoons production. CBS has the rights to the other 1/3 of the gross and the actual right to produce any new non-licensed material, and Time-Warner-AOL has the rights to all 1952 and before Terrytoons shorts through Ted Turner's acquisition of American Artists Productions from the United Artists bankruptcy auction.

    That's one reason there hasn't been much new Terrytoons material for the last thirty years. The other is that Heckle and Jekyll are considered avian Steppen Fetchits, despite having no such speech patterns or mannerisms.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2019
  19. Threadmarks: The Future is Now: Welcoming the 1980s

    HeX Self-Proclaimed Disney Expert

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    Magic Kingdom Park, Disney World, Orlando, FL
    December 31, 1979

    The extended Disney family was having a day at the races on New Year's Eve. Walt's wife, Lilly, and daughters, Diane and Sharon, had taken the latter's three young children to ride the Western River Expedition and it's a small world until they got sick of it. Knowing them, they'd be in there all night. Roy's son and daughter-in-law were off with their own kids somewhere in the depths of Adventureland. And Walt was pretty sure George and Maria Lucas were off in Fantasyland, to get their minds off Star Wars and science-fiction.

    That left two men on a bench.

    Walt and Roy sat next to each other in a spot halfway between Space Port and Seabase Atlantic. The streets were crowded with park guests and families rushing to get from one ride or land to the next, all while keeping in mind they needed to find the perfect spots to see the midnight fireworks. It was Disney World's usual brand of controlled chaos, the type that frustrates in the moment but disappears from memory when looking back on the trip.

    Walt stared into the crowd. Weary adults pushed strollers and dragged along children. Some massaged their sore feet, argued over where to eat dinner, and pushed, shoved, and barreled their way through the sea of people. But unlike other places where one might see a similar scene, it was different at Disney. Here, everyone had a permanent, goofy, childlike grin plastered onto their faces, even with all the annoyances.

    "What are you thinking about?" asked Roy.

    "Oh, just... people. The future, I suppose," replied Walt.

    "Always the futurist, eh?"

    Walt chuckled. "You know me too well."

    "What were you really thinking about, Walt?"

    "The future. I wasn't lying."

    "Well, what about the future?"

    "Just... well, we're in a new decade now. Or at least, we will be in a little while. And, for once, I don't know what's going to happen. Universal's on our heels, Roy. I hope Woody Woodpecker was a fluke, but I don't think it will be. Did you see they've got Walter Lantz and Tex Avery in there training their animators?"

    "Yeah," agreed Roy. "But we've got Don and you. I'd say we're evenly matched."

    "...I guess."

    The two brothers looked up at the stars for a little while. With Central Florida not exactly known for being a metropolitan center, the constellations were clearly visible in the night sky. Orion's Belt and the Big Dipper gleamed and twinkled. A shooting star streaked by, blinking in and out of view as fast as lightning.

    "Halley's Comet will be here in just a few short years, you know," commented Roy.

    Walt nodded. "And to think I first set Tomorrowland in 1986... we're practically there, and I don't see any spaceships taking us to the Moon and back on a day's trip yet!"

    "You know, I've been meaning to ask you something," said Roy. "With the EPCOT Center open now and an entire theme park dedicated to envisioning the future, what are you going to do about Tomorrowland in the parks?"

    "Well... here, in the Magic Kingdom, I mean, I think we're going to start shifting towards a 'science-fiction' interpretation of the future, not a realistic one, since EPCOT is right there. But in Anaheim and Tokyo, I don't think we'll make any changes. They'll still be time capsules from the future."

    "I wonder what this place will look like the next time Halley's Comet comes," mused Roy, reclining in his seat, his face awash in the neon glow of Tomorrowland's bright lights.

    "That's assuming people will be even interested in Disney then."

    "I assume they will be."

    Walt sighed. "I guess I hope they'll have made good decisions in my absence. Kept the spirit alive. Didn't give into corporate greed. Saw new ideas--good ideas--and pounced on them."

    "...I think that'll happen. The people at the studio are crazy about you, Walt. Your legacy won't be going anywhere anytime soon."

    "Thanks, Roy. Don't sell yourself short, though--I couldn't have made it this far without you and your love of number-crunching."

    The two men sat there in silence, appreciating their surroundings, until Walt's watch started to buzz.

    "Enough with the mushiness, Roy. That was my timer for thirty minutes to midnight--we'd better go find our wives, they'll have our heads if we're not with them for New Year's."

    Walt and Roy stood, and strolled off into the depths of the Magic Kingdom.

    --------------------------------
    Michael Eisner's House, Los Angeles, CA
    December 31, 1979

    Michael Eisner took another sip of his martini, milling about the large living room of his Los Angeles home. His abode was not humble, but fit for a king--or, rather, the head of America's second-largest entertainment company. The company party he was hosting was almost a who's who of Disney's arch rivals. Universal, Paramount, Warner, MGM, United Artists, even Fox, the black sheep of the Hollywood herd these days--it didn't matter. Everyone had the same goal in mind:

    Beat the mouse, and take his house.

    "Michael Eisner! I haven't seen you in a million years! How're things at Universal suiting you?"

    Eisner almost spit up his drink. It was Jeffrey Katzenberg, a fellow 'Killer Diller' and one of his least favorite people in the movie business. But hey, he could afford to be polite for at least a little while. It was the holidays, after all.

    "Hey, Jeff. Universal's going good, we're pretty hot stuff right now with Woody Woodpecker doing so well," Eisner replied, wiping his mouth.

    "I know, I went to see it with my friend and his family and we all loved it. It was some good work."

    "What's up at Paramount? Barry still treating you right?" asked Eisner.

    Katzenberg shrugged. "We've been working nonstop on PTS and Star Trek. The movie about lived up to expectations, but with Phase II on the way we're shifting into overdrive."

    "Still haven't come up with a better name than 'Phase II', huh?"

    "Trust me, that's the least of our priorities right now," quipped Katzenberg.

    "Well, to a happy, more relaxed new year, I suppose," said Eisner, raising his glass.

    "Hear, hear!"

    Michael Eisner and Jeffrey Katzenberg bid farewell and parted ways, being absorbed into the crowd once more. The president of Universal bounced from conversation to conversation, getting the feel of Hollywood's climate upon entry into the 1980s.

    "I frankly don't know what's going to happen if Heaven's Gate doesn't rock the box office," lamented Gordon Stulberg. "Fox is already in the red. One more flop, and we're sunk."

    "CNN's coming along just fine. Only a few more months, and Warner will be launching the world's first twenty-four-hour cable news channel," said Ted Turner, grinning broadly.

    "We've decided to split the company in two. One half will be for filmmaking, and the other half hotels and casinos. I'm not proud of it, but it has to happen or we'll die before Fox does," David Begelman complained.

    "Sylvester Stallone is a huge powerhouse these days. We're lucky to have him," boasted United Artists' Eric Pleskow.

    Eisner clapped him on the shoulder. "That's great, Eric. Really great. Tell me, did you all manage to work out your issues with Transamerica? I heard rumors about you and a couple other guys leaving UA to found a new studio."

    "Yes, we patched things up. It certainly helped that they agreed to say no to Heaven's Gate. I mean, I love Gordon and Alan, but I just don't understand what they see in that over budget mess. It's going to be their downfall, I can see it now."

    "Honestly, I couldn't agree with you more. Fox is just--"

    "Everyone! The ball's about to drop!" yelled a woman from MGM.

    The whole party rushed around, trying to find their loved ones and get a good view of the TV. Michael Eisner eventually found his wife near the front of the room.

    "10... 9... 8... 7... 6... 5... 4... 3... 2... 1... Happy New Year!" roared the party.

    Eisner leaned down and kissed his wife, hoping that this decade would be the one he would be remembered for, as the man who made Universal king.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2019
  20. Calcaterra Stuff About Politics (& Sports)

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    New Year’s Eve is December 31st, not January 31st (that’s not even a day).
     
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