Laughin' Place: Redefining Disney

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: After 1900' started by HeX, Oct 18, 2018.

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  1. Nivek Resident Videogame Expert

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    Dunno i liked the Feline naming scheme, like sega with planets, just worked fine(till the ranout of feline and planets respectly)

    Arcade is always an interesting business and walt got something for people to got their parks with those too
     
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  2. ImSadCauseImAlone Not REALLY a Well-Known Member

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    I hope it doesn't.

    The Beatles in the 80s is a SCARY thought for me...look at the Stones' Dirty Work or Dylan's Knocked Out Loaded and then tell me 60s stars weren't embarrassing themselves to death during that decade. (Wilburys excepted of course, but they had Petty to give them a fresh contemporary sound)
     
  3. ImSadCauseImAlone Not REALLY a Well-Known Member

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    @HeX

    Even though The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh only got moderately received ITTL, I'm glad it appears to have actually had a real theatrical release. IOTL, it was barely released in theaters and it only got massively popular after it was put on VHS in the early 80s.
     
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  4. HeX Teddy Roosevelt 2020

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    Yes, but also look at the success of Queen. That band is, IMO, quite similar to the Beatles in their style (at least, the Beatles towards the end of their career), and they enjoyed enormous success. Not to mention that the band could easily roll with the punches and find a new sound more in tune with modern audiences...

    Elvis is also still around ITTL and is still popular, so perhaps some classic rock 'n' roll is still enjoyed by everyone.
     
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  5. ImSadCauseImAlone Not REALLY a Well-Known Member

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    In the 80s, Queen were only a decade away from their first success, and so they still sounded somewhat fresh at the time (unlike the Stones, the Who, Dylan, or any other major 60s artist who wasn't Aretha or Paul Simon). They were more likely to, to quote one of Queen's contemporaries, ro-o-oll with the punches and get to what's real.
     
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  6. Unknown Member

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    Queen and the Beatles doing an album together ITTL would be good...
     
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  7. HeX Teddy Roosevelt 2020

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    True, but I think that the Beatles together can make much better music than any of the four of them by themselves. This is the band, remember, that wrote songs like "I Am the Walrus," "Yellow Submarine," "Maxwell's Silver Hammer," and "Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds," extremely strange and out-there songs for the 1960s or even today. So if they can make those, then they can surely roll with any punch, kick, or body slam the world of music may throw at them.

    Plus, they're the Beatles. People will turn out because of the name alone.
     
  8. Traincakes Well-Known Member

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    Out of curiosity, since we're talking about them, will Queen do the soundtrack for a Disney movie? I know that they did Flash Gordon, but maybe they could do another sci-fi film?
     
  9. HeX Teddy Roosevelt 2020

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    Perhaps...
     
  10. Traincakes Well-Known Member

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    Why do I get the feeling that a Star Wars spinoff will have an absolutely killer soundtrack all of a second?
     
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  11. Threadmarks: The Forty-Ninth Academy Awards, 1977

    HeX Teddy Roosevelt 2020

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    The Forty-Ninth Academy Awards sent shockwaves through the system. While traditional "Oscar-worthy" films like All the President's Men still made off with a large number of trophies, this was the ceremony where the underdogs ruled. Sports film Rocky took the two most coveted Oscars, Best Picture and Best Director, while the satirical movie Network became the second movie to ever win three acting awards. The performance of dark horse candidate The Snow Queen shocked everyone, giving Rocky and All the President's Men a real run for their money in their winning categories and taking home three of its own.

    This outstanding run at the Academy Awards prompted the organization to soon after announce that, for the very first time, an award for Best Animated Feature would be given at the Fiftieth Academy Awards in 1978. Many people, Walt Disney included, applauded this decision, glad that the world of film had finally accepted animation as a true art form.

    Awards Won at the 47th Academy Awards
    Best Picture:
    Rocky
    Best Director: John G. Avildsen, Rocky
    Best Actor: Peter Finch, Network
    Best Actress: Faye Dunaway, Network
    Best Supporting Actor: Jason Robards, All the President's Men
    Best Supporting Actress: Beatrice Straight, Network
    Best Original Screenplay: Network, Paddy Chayefsky
    Best Screenplay Adapted from Other Material: All the President's Men, William Goldman and Carl Bernstein/Bob Woodward
    Best Documentary Feature: Harlan County, USA, Barbara Kopple
    Best Documentary Short Subject: Number Our Days, Lynne Littman
    Best Live Action Short Film: In the Region of Ice, Anne Guttfreund and Peter Werner
    Best Animated Short Film: Leisure, Suzanne Baker
    Best Original Score: The Omen, Jerry Goldsmith
    Best Original Song Score and Its Adaptation or Adaptation Score: Bound For Glory, Leonard Rosenman
    Best Original Song: "Let Them Go," The Snow Queen, Buddy Baker, Robert Sherman, and Richard Sherman
    Best Sound: All the President's Men, Arthur Piantadosi, Les Fresholtz, Dick Alexander, and Jim Webb
    Best Foreign Language Film: Black and White in Color, Côte d'Ivoire
    Best Costume Design: Fellini's Casanova, Danilo Donati
    Best Art Direction: The Snow Queen, Don Bluth
    Best Cinematography: The Snow Queen, Don Bluth
    Best Film Editing: Rocky, Richard Halsey and Scott Conrad

    --------------------------------
    Walt Disney's Office, Burbank, CA
    March 29, 1977

    "Heya, Walt. You wanted to see me?" said Don Bluth, waltzing into his boss' office.

    Walt smirked. "More like congratulate you. It's thanks to you that the Academy has finally come to their senses and opened up an award for Best Animated Feature."

    "Yeah, we're going to dominate that category, let me tell you. Although... it's a bit disappointing that Winnie the Pooh will probably be the first, over The Snow Queen."

    Walt sighed, and folded his hands on his desk. "It is, isn't it?"

    An awkward silence hung there for a second, Bluth's mind on The Snow Queen and Walt's on Beauty and the Beast, both silently wishing their own film had been the first. "Anyways, I've got a suggestion for the Mickey movie you all in animation are working on."

    "Oh?" asked Bluth, intrigued.

    "With it being for Mickey's fiftieth and all, I was thinking that before the movie actually begins, we could have Steamboat Willie play, for old time's sake, as a short."

    Bluth's mind was racing with anticipation and ideas. "Tell you what, Walt: we won't just show Steamboat Willie, we'll do you one better."

    "Excuse me?"

    "We'll remaster the cartoon, re-animate it from start to finish with more expertise than Ub Iwerks could have hoped to have. And then, we'll play that before the movie."

    "...Don, you have too many good ideas," laughed Walt. "Go right ahead, you have my permission. Just do the mouse well!"
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2019 at 3:42 PM
  12. Traincakes Well-Known Member

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    Oh this is going to be good...
     
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  13. nbcman Donor

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    "Let Them Go"? You mean there won't be the army of pre-pubescent girls singing "Let It Go" at the tops of their lungs? Truly a better world this is!
     
  14. HeX Teddy Roosevelt 2020

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    "Let Them Go" is basically a rap, so it's unlikely they'd even be able to sing it in the first place.
     
  15. TheFaultsofAlts Well-Known Member

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    As a Pooh fan myself, I agree with your thoughts here.
     
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  16. Unknown Member

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    If Let Them Go had been released as a single, could it be considered the first rap song?
     
  17. HeX Teddy Roosevelt 2020

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    Kinda, I suppose, but it's not really a rap in the traditional sense. It's a very fast song, and would probably be seen as a sort of predecessor to the genre. (It's not released as a single, but later on it and several other Disney movies will have their scores released on CD, so there's that.)
     
  18. PunMaster Well-Known Member

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    Technically, the first rap songs were in The Last Poets’ first album, in 1970. So Let Them Go would be six years late to the party.
     
  19. OldNavy1988 Well-Known Member

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    What year is it right now ITTL?
     
  20. HeX Teddy Roosevelt 2020

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    The grand old year of Nineteen-Hundred and Seventy-Seven. (1977, in normal words.)
     
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