Late Antiquity without Aetius

Thinking about how to let the events of the collapse of the Roman Empire in an original way thought, why not remove Flavius Aetius? Given that even in his youth he was involved in a political struggle, it could end unsuccessfully for him.

Let's assume, Aecius for some reasons leaves the political scene of Rome of V century. As I understand it, he played a major role in resolving problems with the barbarians in Gaul and Aquitaine. I assume that without Aecius, the Visigoths' marches towards the sea would be more successful and the Burgundians would avoid massacres.

But I am not so well versed in the history of late antiquity, I would like to hear your criticism.
 
There are still Felix and Bonifacius, in the 420s, who could have filled at least the military void, although both had their problems with Placida.
 
There are still Felix and Bonifacius, in the 420s, who could have filled at least the military void, although both had their problems with Placida.
I wonder how the absence of Aetius will affect the relations of Western Rome with the Huns. As far as I understand, it was Aetius (because of his past) who successfully led the Hunnic mercenaries against the Visigoths and Burgundians. If there is no Aetius, and the Visigoths are more powerful, can there not be a situation when Honoria writes a letter to someone else from the barbarians instead of Attila (or no one at all)? Moreover, the situation on the Rhine promises to be interesting - there, in addition to the Franks and Alemanni, there are also Burgundians.
 
Looks like I found a good moment to take Aetius out of the game:

"In 432, after Flavius Felix, his wife Padusia, and a deacon had been hanged by the Roman army, allegedly at the instigation of Flavius Aetius whose power she sought to resist, Placidia appointed Bonifatius magister utriusque militiae and patricius of the west, despite his unsuccessful record in Africa. Bonifacius led his forces against Aetius and the Gallic army at the Battle of Rimini in 432. Bonifacius and his son-in-law Sebastianus were victorious, and Aetius was allowed to retire to his private estates, although Bonifatius was mortally wounded by a lance during the conflict. He died sometime between a few days and three months after the battle."(с)Wiki

Given that OTL Flavius Aecius sacrificed Africa for Gaul, I suppose a victorious Boniface might have acted differently -- not fighting in Gaul, but defeating the Vandals in Carthage.
 
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