L’Aigle Triomphant: A Napoleonic Victory TL

Could Napoleon focus on the Ottomans next?
They’re a useful buffer to the Russians for now - and anyways, why give the British another potential ally/landing site in Europe?
So, how many Redcoats will be in Canada come 1812?
Probably a slightly higher number than OTL without Wellesley’s forces deployed in Spain or the armies in Italy and the Low Countries. Britain still probably doesn’t want to route toooo many forces away from the Continent while Nap is hostile though
 
They’re a useful buffer to the Russians for now - and anyways, why give the British another potential ally/landing site in Europe?

This was more or less the plan during the War of the 3rd Coalition: Sébastiani persuaded the Ottomans to take a stand against Russia and to depose the pro-Russian rulers of the Danube Principalities (which was against the letter of the Treaty of Küçük Kaynarca and the Treaty of Jassy) and then, in 1807, helped the Ottomans in the successful defense of Constantinople against the British squadron of Admiral Duckworth. However, the next Sultan (*) become deeply dissatisfied with Sébastiani's interventions and policies and he was recalled (after this Nappy never trusted him with the diplomatic missions).

The Brits (allied with the Russians, until Tilsit) had been at war with the Ottomans until 1809 but by the Treaty of the Dardanelles (5 January 1809) the Ottomans got British pledge to protect the integrity of the Ottoman Empire against the French (but not Russian) threat, both with its own fleet and through weapons supplies to Constantinople. So, for prevention of the British-Ottoman alliance it is too late and as for the British landing site, it was not on the table (being pretty much pointless geographically). ;)

In OTL Nappy, rather typically, chose the worst scenario possible: he was in alliance with Russia while openly gloating about an absence of the Russian success against the Ottomans (aka, not helping one side and pissing off another).

_____________________
(*) Hunger revolts caused by the Russian blockade of the Dardanelles resulted in assassination of Sultan Selim III and his replacement with Mustafa IV.
 
Le Monsieur des Myriades
Le Monsieur des Myriades

“…before all else, comes France…”

- Talleyrand
(apocryphal)

Perhaps no notable of the post-Revolutionary era cuts a stranger figure than Talleyrand; as the epic opera about his life, Les Myraides, detailed, he was simultaneously an ardent French patriot who nevertheless found himself in the parlors and salons of Europe taking bribes, selling secrets and cutting deals with foreign powers, all in the name of what he thought was best for his homeland. He was a clergyman with a taste for expensive mistresses, a cynic of the first order who’s name is now synonymous with crafty diplomacy. When his treacheries were eventually revealed shortly before they both died, the only reason he was spared the guillotine despite his advanced age was that his machinations had, in the end, worked, despite the ugly means to their end.

Talleyrand had been as shocked as anyone at the compounding on Napoleon’s successes at Tilsit with his last minute decision to refuse Ferdinand at Bayonne and re-install Charles IV, followed by a settlement in Sweden overly favorable to Russia. His first concern was that the Emperor would follow up these successes with a potentially destabilizing move against the Papacy in Rome, and so his first priority was to make sure to consolidate these gains. Despite no longer being Foreign Minister, he quietly traveled to Vilnius shortly after the Treaty of Stockholm to advise Alexander, who was turning his full attention to the Ottomans at last. They had struck up a healthy relationship at Erfurt the previous autumn; now it was time for Talleyrand to argue his case.

It had been made plain to the wily old diplomat that Alexander cared little for Napoleon at best and held him in contempt at worst; the influential Dowager Empress’ attitudes were even more negative. Aware from his dealings with Napoleon that personality and pride oft dictated the fate of nations as much as strategy, Talleyrand approached the matter carefully. It was at Erfurt that he had begun probing the issue of a new wife for Napoleon; Empress Josephine was aging and likely infertile, and Talleyrand knew that a peaceful transfer of power was the only way to consolidate France’s gains rather than have the Marshals fight over the scraps (the thought of a Warlord Murat in particular galled him). The suggestion of marrying the Tsar’s sister Ekaterina Palvovna to Napoleon had horrified the Russian court (Dowager Maria Feodorovna in particular), and Talleyrand was preparing to steel himself for rejection once again, or news that her hand had already been promised.

His hand, and Russia’s, was strengthened at Napoleon’s expense by the time he arrived, for news of an assassination attempt in Rome accompanied him (indeed Talleyrand learned of it as he was being shown to his quarters). A priest had brandished a pistol as Napoleon rode past into the Vatican and fired a single shot; it grazed the Emperor’s shoulder and struck and killed one of the Imperial Guards. The attempt had caused chaos and a riot in the Vatican herself and threatened the political stability of Italy; more than that, though, it reinforced Talleyrand’s determination to find a suitable young bride to bear Napoleon an heir, and Alexander’s leverage.

Despite his mother’s protests, Alexander was willing to hear Talleyrand out. As Le Myriade put it, a marriage would bind Russia closer to France, and reduce the chances of an invasion by Napoleon in the future but also reduce the ability of Paris to interfere in Alexander’s ambitions in Eastern Europe and beyond. The Continental System would be easier to ignore, Austria better contained, and Russia’s status as a great power equal only to France and Britain assured. Talleyrand tipped his hand that France had been closer to defeat before Austerlitz than previously thought, and even suggested to the silent Tsar that in the event that Napoleon - occasionally known to suffer poor health - should pass early, influence over a “half-Russian” nephew would place Russia first in a new European balance of power.

Already riding high from his surprising coup at Stockholm, Alexander shocked his mother and the Russian public by changing course and agreeing to marry Ekaterina to Napoleon, on the condition that no formal military alliance be signed by Russia and France against Austria or Britain and that Prussia be considered part of the Russian sphere of influence and thus beyond French interference (unspoken - that the Duchy of Warsaw, which Alexander hated, was thus sandwiched). For the second time in a year, Alexander took his considerable advantage and pocketed it, marveling at his continued run of luck that had been delivered to him nearly prostrate by the French…
 

Deleted member 143920

Le Monsieur des Myriades

“…before all else, comes France…”

- Talleyrand
(apocryphal)

Perhaps no notable of the post-Revolutionary era cuts a stranger figure than Talleyrand; as the epic opera about his life, Les Myraides, detailed, he was simultaneously an ardent French patriot who nevertheless found himself in the parlors and salons of Europe taking bribes, selling secrets and cutting deals with foreign powers, all in the name of what he thought was best for his homeland. He was a clergyman with a taste for expensive mistresses, a cynic of the first order who’s name is now synonymous with crafty diplomacy. When his treacheries were eventually revealed shortly before they both died, the only reason he was spared the guillotine despite his advanced age was that his machinations had, in the end, worked, despite the ugly means to their end.

Talleyrand had been as shocked as anyone at the compounding on Napoleon’s successes at Tilsit with his last minute decision to refuse Ferdinand at Bayonne and re-install Charles IV, followed by a settlement in Sweden overly favorable to Russia. His first concern was that the Emperor would follow up these successes with a potentially destabilizing move against the Papacy in Rome, and so his first priority was to make sure to consolidate these gains. Despite no longer being Foreign Minister, he quietly traveled to Vilnius shortly after the Treaty of Stockholm to advise Alexander, who was turning his full attention to the Ottomans at last. They had struck up a healthy relationship at Erfurt the previous autumn; now it was time for Talleyrand to argue his case.

It had been made plain to the wily old diplomat that Alexander cared little for Napoleon at best and held him in contempt at worst; the influential Dowager Empress’ attitudes were even more negative. Aware from his dealings with Napoleon that personality and pride oft dictated the fate of nations as much as strategy, Talleyrand approached the matter carefully. It was at Erfurt that he had begun probing the issue of a new wife for Napoleon; Empress Josephine was aging and likely infertile, and Talleyrand knew that a peaceful transfer of power was the only way to consolidate France’s gains rather than have the Marshals fight over the scraps (the thought of a Warlord Murat in particular galled him). The suggestion of marrying the Tsar’s sister Ekaterina Palvovna to Napoleon had horrified the Russian court (Dowager Maria Feodorovna in particular), and Talleyrand was preparing to steel himself for rejection once again, or news that her hand had already been promised.

His hand, and Russia’s, was strengthened at Napoleon’s expense by the time he arrived, for news of an assassination attempt in Rome accompanied him (indeed Talleyrand learned of it as he was being shown to his quarters). A priest had brandished a pistol as Napoleon rode past into the Vatican and fired a single shot; it grazed the Emperor’s shoulder and struck and killed one of the Imperial Guards. The attempt had caused chaos and a riot in the Vatican herself and threatened the political stability of Italy; more than that, though, it reinforced Talleyrand’s determination to find a suitable young bride to bear Napoleon an heir, and Alexander’s leverage.

Despite his mother’s protests, Alexander was willing to hear Talleyrand out. As Le Myriade put it, a marriage would bind Russia closer to France, and reduce the chances of an invasion by Napoleon in the future but also reduce the ability of Paris to interfere in Alexander’s ambitions in Eastern Europe and beyond. The Continental System would be easier to ignore, Austria better contained, and Russia’s status as a great power equal only to France and Britain assured. Talleyrand tipped his hand that France had been closer to defeat before Austerlitz than previously thought, and even suggested to the silent Tsar that in the event that Napoleon - occasionally known to suffer poor health - should pass early, influence over a “half-Russian” nephew would place Russia first in a new European balance of power.

Already riding high from his surprising coup at Stockholm, Alexander shocked his mother and the Russian public by changing course and agreeing to marry Ekaterina to Napoleon, on the condition that no formal military alliance be signed by Russia and France against Austria or Britain and that Prussia be considered part of the Russian sphere of influence and thus beyond French interference (unspoken - that the Duchy of Warsaw, which Alexander hated, was thus sandwiched). For the second time in a year, Alexander took his considerable advantage and pocketed it, marveling at his continued run of luck that had been delivered to him nearly prostrate by the French…

Great update!

While no one is content about a Russian bride for Napoleon at the Romanov court, it does further strengthen Russian influence. But Alexander's luck is mostly based on Napoleon's desire to maintain the alliance; therefore, should some catalyst occur, there would be a rupture of that alliance and Napoleon would invade Russia as in OTL. Should that be the case, Russia would most likely have to seceded the 2nd and 3rd Polish partition territory to the Duchy of Warsaw, albeit keeping the 1st partition territory for logical reasons related to geography (e.g. the river boundaries).

Keep going with the hard work!
 
Great update!

While no one is content about a Russian bride for Napoleon at the Romanov court, it does further strengthen Russian influence. But Alexander's luck is mostly based on Napoleon's desire to maintain the alliance; therefore, should some catalyst occur, there would be a rupture of that alliance and Napoleon would invade Russia as in OTL. Should that be the case, Russia would most likely have to seceded the 2nd and 3rd Polish partition territory to the Duchy of Warsaw, albeit keeping the 1st partition territory for logical reasons related to geography (e.g. the river boundaries).

Keep going with the hard work!
Well said - I don’t have anything planned out past 1810/11 beyond broad strokes but that’d be the likely limit of any French engagement in Russia, I agree
 
The Consolidation - the West
The Consolidation - the West

"...an insect of a man, who with a stroke could have felled an elephant..."

- Joseph Bonaparte


Napoleon's near-death experience in Rome hardened his resolve against his enemies and perhaps helped end his giddy sense of indestructibility that had followed him since the improbable rout at Austerlitz. His goal now was one thing, and one thing alone - to consolidate his victories and set up the new France for his great dynasty. He was still in Rome, drafting his next decisions, when he heard that Talleyrand had secured Grand Duchess Catherine of Russia's hand in marriage. Napoleon was elated at the diplomatic stroke though saddened that he would have to bid farewell to his beloved, but barren, Josephine.

The news perhaps was well timed, for it helped satisfy the Emperor enough that his redrawing of Italy's map in the summer of 1809 was milder than expected. His sister Elisa and her husband Felix, already Prince and Princess of Lucca and Piombino, were now granted titles as Queen and Prince Consort of Etruria, which was to see its French occupation ended, but its position in the Continental System maintained, now that Charles Louis had been compensated as Charles II of Portugal. Napoleon quietly granted the Kingdom of Italy some of Bavaria's land south of the Alps (and the city of Trent) in return for ceding his personal possessions of Bayreuth and Erfurt to Maximilian Joseph, and then set about attempting to solve the question of Rome.

The reality was that with the Peace of Stockholm guaranteeing, at least for the time being, a broad peace on the land and much of his armies headed home for a much-needed rest from war, the necessity and costs of garrisoning Italy were starting to look daunting. Not only that, but Napoleon had two siblings now in Florence and Naples, a personal union with the Kingdom of Italy in the north which would eventually go to his adoptive son Eugene de Beauharnais, and in the Papal State a Pope, Pius VII, who participated willingly and openly in the Continental System. Napoleon saw Rome as the ultimate feather in his cap, however; it was his desire to incorporate it into his personal domain and to make his and Catherine's future son titular King of Rome. That Pius VII had been insufficiently responsive to the near-assassination by that damned priest irked him as well.

It was Bernadotte who, in one of his lengthy debates on geopolitics [1], presented a solution to Napoleon. Knowing that the Papacy would not accept a complete suspension of temporal powers in the Papal State, he instead suggested incorporating it as a "protectorate." In the Farnese Declaration, made from the Palazzo Farnese, Napoleon announced that France would heretoforth regarded the Papal State as its protectorate, with the French Emperor "defender of the Church" by title. In his role of Defender of the Church, France would be wholly responsible for the Church's temporal (though not spiritual) activities of foreign policy and defense, meaning that the army of the the Papal State would be under direct French control. Internally, the Papal State would be governed by the Curia as before; however, the French Emperor was permitted to grant noble titles within its territory, and as his first move named Bernadotte Duke of Anzio (and thus his titular personal representative in Rome) in addition to his title as Prince of Pontecorvo, and vowed to make "Duke of Rome" the title of his heir. The Duchy of Rome, though holding no temporal authority, was to enjoy substantial incomes for which the Pope would be responsible to produce; several cardinals noted begrudgingly that this reeked of France extorting the Papacy at gunpoint, perhaps not an inaccurate summation of the state of affairs.

The more fundamental reason Napoleon did not annex Rome entirely, of course, was not just to avoid setting Catholic Europe aflame in anger (particularly Austria, which would be sure to react to such a move what with its substantial army reforms over the last four years) but to avoid any distractions from his final target - Britain. The Farnese Declaration, though reviled in Italy and stirring up a great deal of resentment in the Papal State, was the exclamation point on European peace in Napoleon's mind. "The matters of state here have been solved," he announced. Now only Britain remained, with all other enemies conquered or sated. In Italy in particular, his able brother Joseph had in a few short years turned Naples into a model kingdom, doubling the number of roads and schools while the reactionary Bourbons he had overthrown sulked in Messina in Sicily licking their wounds and glaring angrily. A new, enlightened cadre of monarchs dotted the continent now, upholding Napoleonic ideals. But Britain remained to fend off, and Napoleon needed a lasting peace to defeat the enemy he obsessed over the most. Later in 1809, with his Army of the Low Countries, he stood at Calais and stared across at the White Cliffs of Dover, thinking about what he would need to achieve to find victory over London...

[1] Hat tip to @alexmilman for this idea
 
The Consolidation - the East
The Consolidation - the East
"...see, brother, what our friendship with the French has produced! What gains we have seen, with no enemies on any horizon left to molest us!"

- Grand Duke Konstantin Pavlovich


The Ottoman signing of the Treaty of the Dardanelles with Britain allowed both sides to return their attention fully to the intrigue on the Danube, and later in 1809, shortly after Catherine's marriage to Napoleon, a great battle erupted near Silistra, with a reinforced Prince Bagration able to drive the Turks back. The Porte was alarmed when the quiet encouragements of the French to keep fighting went completely silent; it appeared, finally, that perhaps the Franco-Russian understanding was genuine. The Porte sued for peace, brokered by Britain. It was a largely white peace decided upon at the Treaty of Bucharest; the Ottomans paid a small indemnity, reinstalled the pre-war rulers of Wallachia and Moldavia as Russia had demanded, and ceded a small territory south of the Dniester known as Budjak, giving Russia the Danube port of Izmail as well. In the Caucasus it was status quo ante, but for Russian annexations of Georgian lands, and allowed Russia to turn her full attention to the on-again, off-again war with the Persians over neighboring lands - that would be quickly settled too, as Persia, faced by the full strength of Russia marching towards the mountains, sued for peace, ceding the rest of Georgia south of the mountains and all of Dagestan north of it in the Treaty of Baku.

These moves came to be seen as a grand consolidation of the Alexandrine order in the East of Europe; Russia was ascendant and mighty, and was pre-eminent now in the Black Sea. With the Christian Wallachia and Moldavia in her influence again, her power projected deep into the Balkans. Much of the Court seemed pleased by the string of rapid, territory-earning glories in quick succession, but Alexander remained restless as always; was this really all there was? Had he indeed solved the war issues of Europe along with Napoleon, or was there more to be done...?
 

Deleted member 143920

The Consolidation - the West

"...an insect of a man, who with a stroke could have felled an elephant..."

- Joseph Bonaparte


Napoleon's near-death experience in Rome hardened his resolve against his enemies and perhaps helped end his giddy sense of indestructibility that had followed him since the improbable rout at Austerlitz. His goal now was one thing, and one thing alone - to consolidate his victories and set up the new France for his great dynasty. He was still in Rome, drafting his next decisions, when he heard that Talleyrand had secured Grand Duchess Catherine of Russia's hand in marriage. Napoleon was elated at the diplomatic stroke though saddened that he would have to bid farewell to his beloved, but barren, Josephine.

The news perhaps was well timed, for it helped satisfy the Emperor enough that his redrawing of Italy's map in the summer of 1809 was milder than expected. His sister Elisa and her husband Felix, already Prince and Princess of Lucca and Piombino, were now granted titles as Queen and Prince Consort of Etruria, which was to see its French occupation ended, but its position in the Continental System maintained, now that Charles Louis had been compensated as Charles II of Portugal. Napoleon quietly granted the Kingdom of Italy some of Bavaria's land south of the Alps (and the city of Trent) in return for ceding his personal possessions of Bayreuth and Erfurt to Maximilian Joseph, and then set about attempting to solve the question of Rome.

The reality was that with the Peace of Stockholm guaranteeing, at least for the time being, a broad peace on the land and much of his armies headed home for a much-needed rest from war, the necessity and costs of garrisoning Italy were starting to look daunting. Not only that, but Napoleon had two siblings now in Florence and Naples, a personal union with the Kingdom of Italy in the north which would eventually go to his adoptive son Eugene de Beauharnais, and in the Papal State a Pope, Pius VII, who participated willingly and openly in the Continental System. Napoleon saw Rome as the ultimate feather in his cap, however; it was his desire to incorporate it into his personal domain and to make his and Catherine's future son titular King of Rome. That Pius VII had been insufficiently responsive to the near-assassination by that damned priest irked him as well.

It was Bernadotte who, in one of his lengthy debates on geopolitics [1], presented a solution to Napoleon. Knowing that the Papacy would not accept a complete suspension of temporal powers in the Papal State, he instead suggested incorporating it as a "protectorate." In the Farnese Declaration, made from the Palazzo Farnese, Napoleon announced that France would heretoforth regarded the Papal State as its protectorate, with the French Emperor "defender of the Church" by title. In his role of Defender of the Church, France would be wholly responsible for the Church's temporal (though not spiritual) activities of foreign policy and defense, meaning that the army of the the Papal State would be under direct French control. Internally, the Papal State would be governed by the Curia as before; however, the French Emperor was permitted to grant noble titles within its territory, and as his first move named Bernadotte Duke of Anzio (and thus his titular personal representative in Rome) in addition to his title as Prince of Pontecorvo, and vowed to make "Duke of Rome" the title of his heir. The Duchy of Rome, though holding no temporal authority, was to enjoy substantial incomes for which the Pope would be responsible to produce; several cardinals noted begrudgingly that this reeked of France extorting the Papacy at gunpoint, perhaps not an inaccurate summation of the state of affairs.

The more fundamental reason Napoleon did not annex Rome entirely, of course, was not just to avoid setting Catholic Europe aflame in anger (particularly Austria, which would be sure to react to such a move what with its substantial army reforms over the last four years) but to avoid any distractions from his final target - Britain. The Farnese Declaration, though reviled in Italy and stirring up a great deal of resentment in the Papal State, was the exclamation point on European peace in Napoleon's mind. "The matters of state here have been solved," he announced. Now only Britain remained, with all other enemies conquered or sated. In Italy in particular, his able brother Joseph had in a few short years turned Naples into a model kingdom, doubling the number of roads and schools while the reactionary Bourbons he had overthrown sulked in Messina in Sicily licking their wounds and glaring angrily. A new, enlightened cadre of monarchs dotted the continent now, upholding Napoleonic ideals. But Britain remained to fend off, and Napoleon needed a lasting peace to defeat the enemy he obsessed over the most. Later in 1809, with his Army of the Low Countries, he stood at Calais and stared across at the White Cliffs of Dover, thinking about what he would need to achieve to find victory over London...

[1] Hat tip to @alexmilman for this idea
The Consolidation - the East
"...see, brother, what our friendship with the French has produced! What gains we have seen, with no enemies on any horizon left to molest us!"

- Grand Duke Konstantin Pavlovich


The Ottoman signing of the Treaty of the Dardanelles with Britain allowed both sides to return their attention fully to the intrigue on the Danube, and later in 1809, shortly after Catherine's marriage to Napoleon, a great battle erupted near Silistra, with a reinforced Prince Bagration able to drive the Turks back. The Porte was alarmed when the quiet encouragements of the French to keep fighting went completely silent; it appeared, finally, that perhaps the Franco-Russian understanding was genuine. The Porte sued for peace, brokered by Britain. It was a largely white peace decided upon at the Treaty of Bucharest; the Ottomans paid a small indemnity, reinstalled the pre-war rulers of Wallachia and Moldavia as Russia had demanded, and ceded a small territory south of the Dniester known as Budjak, giving Russia the Danube port of Izmail as well. In the Caucasus it was status quo ante, but for Russian annexations of Georgian lands, and allowed Russia to turn her full attention to the on-again, off-again war with the Persians over neighboring lands - that would be quickly settled too, as Persia, faced by the full strength of Russia marching towards the mountains, sued for peace, ceding the rest of Georgia south of the mountains and all of Dagestan north of it in the Treaty of Baku.

These moves came to be seen as a grand consolidation of the Alexandrine order in the East of Europe; Russia was ascendant and mighty, and was pre-eminent now in the Black Sea. With the Christian Wallachia and Moldavia in her influence again, her power projected deep into the Balkans. Much of the Court seemed pleased by the string of rapid, territory-earning glories in quick succession, but Alexander remained restless as always; was this really all there was? Had he indeed solved the war issues of Europe along with Napoleon, or was there more to be done...?

Both are very interesting and well written updates - I had not expected them both within the same day!

Napoleon's consolidation of power in Italy has proven to be successful and more importantly, beneficial. Further consolidation efforts in Italy may include a French annexation of the Rhodanic Republic, peace with Sardinia (perhaps by offering them Corsica?) and peace with Sicily that would recognize the Bourbons has the legitimate rulers of Sicily and likewise Joseph in Naples (as both claimed each other's titles and I don't think the war against the Sicilian Bourbons ever officially ended). Meanwhile everything East of the Duchy of Warsaw is effectively a Russian playground and they maintain considerable leverage in Central Europe.

While Napoleon is in Calais, Austria who has been angered by his actions in the Papacy and elsewhere, might use the excuse to go to war against France as in OTL? Especially since they've been reforming their military ever since Austerlitz.
 
Napoleon's consolidation of power in Italy has proven to be successful and more importantly, beneficial. Further consolidation efforts in Italy may include a French annexation of the Rhodanic Republic, peace with Sardinia (perhaps by offering them Corsica?)
can you tell me why napoleon would give a national territory (which is his birthplace)
 
Both are very interesting and well written updates - I had not expected them both within the same day!

Napoleon's consolidation of power in Italy has proven to be successful and more importantly, beneficial. Further consolidation efforts in Italy may include a French annexation of the Rhodanic Republic, peace with Sardinia (perhaps by offering them Corsica?) and peace with Sicily that would recognize the Bourbons has the legitimate rulers of Sicily and likewise Joseph in Naples (as both claimed each other's titles and I don't think the war against the Sicilian Bourbons ever officially ended). Meanwhile everything East of the Duchy of Warsaw is effectively a Russian playground and they maintain considerable leverage in Central Europe.

While Napoleon is in Calais, Austria who has been angered by his actions in the Papacy and elsewhere, might use the excuse to go to war against France as in OTL? Especially since they've been reforming their military ever since Austerlitz.
There’ll be some content on various treaties shaking things out and various strategic marriages here soon! Hadnt thought of the Rhodanic Republic - there’s certainly an idea
 

Deleted member 143920

can you tell me why napoleon would give a national territory (which is his birthplace)
Maybe because Corsica was once owned by Genoa (an Italian state) before declaring independence and going to France.

Corsica had been Genoese for 400-500 years before declaring independence, yet Genoa continued to consider the Island under its domain so when they had to pay debts to France, they sold Corsica. To recognize their possession of the island, the French invaded in 1768 (a year before Napoleon's birth).

By the time Napoleon became Emperor, he no longer considered himself Corsican (at least publicly), but French instead. Therefore, while the Corsican people may have been proud to have a fellow Corsican on the French throne, that didn't mean they wanted to be a part of France. And while Sardinian rule wouldn't be any different, they could both identify themselves as fellow island people of the greater Italian identity (which they would have more in common with than being French and a part of France).

This is also don't forget, a rather insignificant island and going by the basis that Napoleon remains Emperor and is successful, then the small sacrifice of Corsica could be possible. And don't forget, I only suggest it as an idea! I never said that its going to happen.
 
Great update!

While no one is content about a Russian bride for Napoleon at the Romanov court, it does further strengthen Russian influence. But Alexander's luck is mostly based on Napoleon's desire to maintain the alliance; therefore, should some catalyst occur, there would be a rupture of that alliance and Napoleon would invade Russia as in OTL. Should that be the case, Russia would most likely have to seceded the 2nd and 3rd Polish partition territory to the Duchy of Warsaw, albeit keeping the 1st partition territory for logical reasons related to geography (e.g. the river boundaries).

Keep going with the hard work!
Ceding results of the partitions would produce too much of a negative reaction in Russia for such a move to be practical: in OTL on insistence of the influential Poles Alexander was contemplating for a short while this idea as applicable to the Congress Poland and got Russian push back serious enough to drop it. This was after the credit of “liberation of Europe” and with the Polish state being in union with Russia. In this TL, we are talking post-Tilsit (with the bonus points for the Finnish War) and completely independent Polish state. Would be very close to a political suicide even if, rationally, it would make a lot of sense by removing the areas of disloyalty. But rationality was not a decisive factor in a public opinion or politics in Russia (otherwise there would be no Russian involvement in the 2nd, 3rd and 4th coalitions ).
 
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