King Edward’s great matter

Part 7 - 1484
Just days after the coronation of Elizabeth as Queen of England and Maximilian as King of England jure-uxoris and the official announce of the second pregnancy of the young Queen more good news arrived in September. Pope Sixtus IV had died in the middle of August and the election of his successor at the end of that month, during one of the shortest and most packed papal conclaves, in the middle of the worst civil unrest Rome had ever seen during the sede vacante, signed by the open conflict between the Orsini and the Colonna families, more-or-less aligned with the two factions of Cardinals leaded by Cardinal Rodrigo Borja, Vice Chancellor of the Holy See (who wanted preserve peace in Italy) and Cardinal nephew Giuliano della Rovere, Dean of the College of Cardinals (who wanted instead affirm the papal power over the preservation of the peace) plus the danger of the election of the Venetian Cardinal Marco Barbo (Camerlengo of the Sacred College of Cardinals) in a moment in which the majority of the Cardinals was favorable to continue the isolation of Venice. Thanks to the decisive intervention of Cardinal Ascanio Sforza - uncle of the reigning Duke of Milan, who had become Cardinal only at the beginning of the year and received the formal investiture at his arrive in a Rome less than a month earlier - and Cardinal Giovanni Battista Cybo, who both pointed on the good relationship who the cardinal had in half-Europe, Vice Chancellor Rodrigo Borja was in the end elected as Pope, taking the name of Alexander VI. Comments on the corruption of that conclave were made and quickly forget as that was ordinary administration for the papal election and for that reason nobody was surprised in seeing Cardinal Cybo replacing the new Pope as Vice Chancellor or Cardinal Sforza becoming quickly one of the principal advisors of the new Pope...
Still in England, together with the news of his election arrived the information who Pope Alexander VI had read the files send by Cardinal Bourchier’s investigators and officially confirmed the validity of Edward IV’s wedding to Elizabeth Woodville and the full legitimacy of their children, together with the recognition of their eldest daughter Elizabeth as only legitimate sovereign of England.
Another well gradite news was the success of young Archduchess Marguerite at the French court: her fiancé King Charles VIII had taken a great liking of her and also the regent Anne de Beaujeu at least apparently was quickly becoming fond of her ward and future sister-in-law.
 
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Sure, but what titles Henry Tudor choose to use as King and what titles Maximilian and Elizabeth choose to give to him and Margaret is another matter... Plus Somerset is a big mess as we have no clear heir for it and is likely to be considered either extinct (or in abeyance between Margaret Beaufort’s cousins (who were daughters/sisters of the last Duke) but the latter is unlikely as Margaret had not inherited them from her father so all the Somerset titles were most likely in male line only. The Earldoms of Richmond and Pembroke will go to Henry, likely to be held in make-line only, from his male line, while the Earldoms of Warwick and Salisbury were restored to Henry’s younger sons but were both already inherited in the female line so Margaret was the clear heiress, after her brother’s renounce to his English titles and lands
The Earldom of Somerset will be in abeyance and thus decided by the Crown. This does not mean the possible male heirs won't make a claim to the title.
Simon de Montfort claimed the Earldom of Leicester via his mother but was only recognised posthumously and after the other possible claimant (his cousin by his mother's sister) was made Earl of Winchester (note that the lands however were split equally).
Considering Henry was already deprived of Richmond prior to Elizabeth becoming queen I see no reason why he wouldn't try for Somerset (the earldom not the duchy btw) too.
 
The Earldom of Somerset will be in abeyance and thus decided by the Crown. This does not mean the possible male heirs won't make a claim to the title.
Simon de Montfort claimed the Earldom of Leicester via his mother but was only recognised posthumously and after the other possible claimant (his cousin by his mother's sister) was made Earl of Winchester (note that the lands however were split equally).
Considering Henry was already deprived of Richmond prior to Elizabeth becoming queen I see no reason why he wouldn't try for Somerset (the earldom not the duchy btw) too.
Well Henry has already four earldoms destined to him or one of his sons (and they were already two before his wedding to Margaret of Clarence and Warwick wedding in Brittany)...
 
Well Henry has already four earldoms destined to him or one of his sons (and they were already two before his wedding to Margaret of Clarence and Warwick wedding in Brittany)...
Now yes, but not earlier. One can see Henry claiming it but essentially cutting his losses when Richmond is confirmed and then the Clarence earldoms by marriage etc.
This however frees it up for Stafford, or if Henry doesn't fully renounce, just drops it, then his eldest son and heirs could resume the claim against the Stafford line.
 
Now yes, but not earlier. One can see Henry claiming it but essentially cutting his losses when Richmond is confirmed and then the Clarence earldoms by marriage etc.
This however frees it up for Stafford, or if Henry doesn't fully renounce, just drops it, then his eldest son and heirs could resume the claim against the Stafford line.
Neither Staffords or Tudors will get it... plus Henry had the security of getting back Richmond and inherit Pembroke (unless uncle Jasper married and had heirs of his own - and the man was well know for saying who he do not needed a different heir from Henry) in case of success before the invasion
 
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York tree
Edward IV, King of England (1442-1483) married Elizabeth Woodville (1440-?) in 1464
  1. Elizabeth of York, Queen of England (1466-?) married Maximilian I of Austria, Holy Roman Emperor(1459-?) in 1483
    1. see under Maximilian
  2. Mary of York (1467-1482)
  3. Cecily of York (1469-?) married James IV, King of Scotland (b.1473) in 1488
    1. see under James
  4. Edward V, King of England (1470 -1483), one of the Princes in the Tower
  5. Margaret of York (1472)
  6. Richard, Duke of York and Norfolk (1473-1483), one of the Princes in the Tower married Anne de Mowbray, Countess of Norfolk (1472-1481)
  7. Anne of York (1475-?) married Philip of Austria, Duke of Burgundy (1478-1500) in 1493
    1. see under Philip
  8. George, Duke of Bedford (1477-1479)
  9. Catherine of York (1479-?) married John, Prince of Asturias and of Girona (1478-1497) in 1495
    1. see under John
  10. Bridget of York (1480-?), nun

Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond and Pembroke (b. 1457) married Margaret of Clarence (b. 1473) in 1489
  1. Jasper Tudor, Earl of Richmond and Pembroke (b. 1490) married Anne Howard (b. 1493)
  2. Margaret Tudor (b. 1492) married George Hastings, Earl of Huntingdon (b. 1488)
  3. Edmund, Earl of Salisbury (b. 1496) married Margaret Percy (b. 1500)
  4. Isabella Tudor (b. 1498) married Henry Stafford, Duke of Buckingham (b. 1501)
  5. Henry Tudor, Earl of Warwick (b. 1500) married Elizabeth Talbot (b. 1506)
  6. Thomas Tudor, Cardinal (b. 1502)

Edward Plantagenet, Earl of Warwick* (b. 1475) married Anne, Duchess of Brittany (b. 1477) in 1489
  1. John, King of Navarre (b. 1493) married Madeleine, Queen of Navarre (b. 1494)
  2. Francis III, Duke of Brittany (b. 1496)
  3. Anne of Brittany (1499-1500)
  4. Isabelle of Brittany (b. 1502)
  5. Margaret of Brittany (1503-1510)
*Edward renounced to that title in 1497
 
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I think Margaret can pop a couple of daughters for Charles VIII that are healthy since the problem was with Anne of Brittany.
 
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I have a query about your marriage of Anne St. Leger. Until Edward IV died, Anne was promised to Edward Grey, eldest son of the marquess of Dorset. Then Richard III came along and the betrothal was broken (for obvious reasons). Now while I could see EoY lobbying extensively for Annie to marry the earl of Surrey (OTL she was the chief architect behind the match between her sister, Anne, and the earl of Surrey), I do think that her half-nephew will do somewhat better on the marriage market with no Perkin Warbeck/Lambert Simnel causing his father's disgrace.

OTL Edward Grey married Anne Jerningham, one of Mary Tudor's ladies. Now, Anne Jerningham was a relative nobody, since her birthdate is postulated everything from 1484 until 1504. Her position in Mary Tudor's chambers seems to have been courtesy of her stepmother (Mary Scrope), who was a lady-in-waiting to Katherine of Aragon, however, she's listed as one of Mary's maids-of-honour when Mary went to France. A scenario, which in a 1484 birth year, seems unlikely at best, that she'd be 31yo and still a maid-of-honour. Even so, she married Edward in France in 1515, then married a Henry Barley sometime after the Cloth of Gold (where she's still spoken of as "Lady Anne Grey") and seems to have been high in favour with Mary Tudor, since she carried both Henry Brandons at their christenings. She and Barley had four kids before he died sometime before 1531 (something that would be rather hard to believe with a 1484 birth-date), then she remarried twice more, once in 1531 to Sir Robert Drury and then again before 1543 to Sir Edmund Walsingham (yup, grandfather to Sir Francis Walsingham).

As I can make out, Anne Jerningham was nobody. She had no connections (unless you count her stepmother's sister being married to Edmund de la Pole) and doesn't seem to have been either an heiress or particularly aristocratic. So, TTL, would Edward Grey be able to marry better? And what of the de la Poles?

Sorry, I know this is probably getting off-topic.
 
I have a query about your marriage of Anne St. Leger. Until Edward IV died, Anne was promised to Edward Grey, eldest son of the marquess of Dorset. Then Richard III came along and the betrothal was broken (for obvious reasons). Now while I could see EoY lobbying extensively for Annie to marry the earl of Surrey (OTL she was the chief architect behind the match between her sister, Anne, and the earl of Surrey), I do think that her half-nephew will do somewhat better on the marriage market with no Perkin Warbeck/Lambert Simnel causing his father's disgrace.

OTL Edward Grey married Anne Jerningham, one of Mary Tudor's ladies. Now, Anne Jerningham was a relative nobody, since her birthdate is postulated everything from 1484 until 1504. Her position in Mary Tudor's chambers seems to have been courtesy of her stepmother (Mary Scrope), who was a lady-in-waiting to Katherine of Aragon, however, she's listed as one of Mary's maids-of-honour when Mary went to France. A scenario, which in a 1484 birth year, seems unlikely at best, that she'd be 31yo and still a maid-of-honour. Even so, she married Edward in France in 1515, then married a Henry Barley sometime after the Cloth of Gold (where she's still spoken of as "Lady Anne Grey") and seems to have been high in favour with Mary Tudor, since she carried both Henry Brandons at their christenings. She and Barley had four kids before he died sometime before 1531 (something that would be rather hard to believe with a 1484 birth-date), then she remarried twice more, once in 1531 to Sir Robert Drury and then again before 1543 to Sir Edmund Walsingham (yup, grandfather to Sir Francis Walsingham).

As I can make out, Anne Jerningham was nobody. She had no connections (unless you count her stepmother's sister being married to Edmund de la Pole) and doesn't seem to have been either an heiress or particularly aristocratic. So, TTL, would Edward Grey be able to marry better? And what of the de la Poles?

Sorry, I know this is probably getting off-topic.
Once Anne St. Ledger was deprived of the Holland inheritance she was not anymore a much interesting match for Edward Grey (if she was EVER engaged to him, as I have read who she was engaged to Thomas not Edward and if their second brother was already dead that is a much logical match) , while Norfolk was much interested in taking the girl (without any dowry) for his grandson...
Edward and Thomas Grey will marry quite well ATL as Dorset is the only brother who remained to Elizabeth. I think either Anne or Catherine de la Pole would be an appropriated match for him (as the the la Poles here will keep titles (both Suffolk and Lincoln) and lands thanks to their no show at the battle AND Lincoln is already married to a first cousin of Dorset).
Thomas Grey well I believe who he will marry some heiress (as was Anne St. Ledger at the time of their engagement) so I am open to suggestions about names...
 
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Actually if Margaret has no at least a surviving daughter her dowry would revert to her brother...so we at least need a daughter surviving and Margaret getting married to a minor French Prince of Blood like the Bourbons is a possibility..
 
Actually if Margaret has no at least a surviving daughter her dowry would revert to her brother...so we at least need a daughter surviving and Margaret getting married to a minor French Prince of Blood like the Bourbons is a possibility..
Margaret will not have any children and Philip will get back the lands of her dowry (and the whole Burgundy)
ATL France will not be the OTL power....
 
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Habsburg tree
Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor (b.1459) married a) Mary, Duchess of Burgundy (1457-1482) in 1477 b) Elizabeth of York, Queen of England (b.1466) in 1483

1a) Philip IV, Duke of Burgundy (1478-1502) married Anne of York (b.1475) in 1493
1) Charles I, King of Lotharingia (b.1495) married Isabelle II, Duchess of Lorraine and Guelders (b.1494)​
2) Margaret of Burgundy (1497-1498)​
3) stillborn son (1498)​
4) miscarriage (1499)​
5) Mary of Burgundy (1500-1501)​
6) stillborn daughter (1501)​
2a) Margaret of Burgundy (b.1480) married Charles VIII, King of France (1470-1498) in 1492
1) stillborn son (1496)​
2) miscarriage (1497)​
3) stillborn daughter (1498)​
3a) Francis (1481)
4b) Edward VI, King of England (b.1483) married Maria of Aragon (b.1482) in 1498
5b) Eleanor (b.1485)
6b) Ernest I, Holy Roman Emperor (b.1487)
7b) Frederick (1489-1492)
8b) Elizabeth (b.1490)
9b) Anne (1491-1498)
10b) Katherine (b.1495) married Maximilian I, Duke of Milan (b.1493)
11b) Maximilian, King of Hungary (b.1497) married Katherine of Hungary (b.1502)
 
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Medici tree
Lorenzo de‘ Medici (1449-1492) married Clarice Orsini (1450-1488) in 1469
  1. Lucrezia Maria Romola de' Medici (b. 1470) married Jacopo Salviati (b. 1461) in 1486
  2. Twins who died after birth (March 1471)
  3. Piero di Lorenzo de' Medici (1472–1494), ruler of Florence married Alfonsina Orsini (b. 1472)
    1. Lorenzo di Piero de’ Medici (1492-1493)
    2. Clarice de‘ Medici (1493-1508) married Lorenzo Borgia (b. 1491) in 1505
  4. Maria Maddalena Romola de' Medici (b. 1473) married Cesare Borgia, Duke of Urbino (b. 1475) in 1489
    1. Maddalena (b.1490) married Alfonso d’Este, Duke of Ferrara (b. 1476) in 1505
    2. Lorenzo, Duke of Florence (b. 1491) married a) Clarice de’ Medici (1493-1509) in 1505 b) Beatrice Sforza (b. 1497) in 1512
    3. Alessandro, Duke of Urbino (b. 1493) married Eleonora d’Este (b. 1497)
    4. Lucrezia (b. 1496) married Ferdinand of Aragon, Prince of Taranto and Duke of Andria (b. 1488)
    5. Rodrigo (1498-1500)
  5. Contessina Beatrice de' Medici (1474)
  6. Giovanni di Lorenzo de' Medici (b. 1475) ascended to the papacy as Leo X in 1513
  7. Luisa de' Medici (1477–1488) engaged to Giovanni de' Medici il Popolano (1467-1498)
  8. Contessina Antonia Romola de' Medici (1478–1515) married Piero Ridolfi (1467–1525) in 1494
  9. Giuliano di Lorenzo de' Medici (1479–1496)
 
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Aragon of Naples tree
Ferdinand I of Aragon, King of Naples (1423-1494) married a) Isabella of Clermont, Princess of Taranto (1424-1465) in 1444 b) Joanna of Aragon (b. 1454) in 1476
1a) Alfonso II, King of Naples (1448-1495) married a) Ippolita Maria Sforza (1446-1484) in 1465, had children by mistress b) Trogia Gazzella
1a) Ferdinando II, King of Naples (b.1469) married a) Bianca Maria Sforza (1472-1496) in 1491 b) Giovanna of Naples (b. 1478) in 1497​
1a) miscarriage (1492)​
2a) stillborn son (1493)​
3a) Alfonso, Duke of Calabria (1494-1502)​
4a) Bianca Maria (b. 1496) married Francesco Sforza, Duke of Bari (b. 1495)​
5b) Ferdinand III, King of Naples (b. 1498) married Eleonora Sforza (b.1498)​
6b) Giovanna (b. 1500)​
7b) Giovanni, Prince of Rossano (1502-1506)​
2a) Isabella (1470-1510) married a) Gian Galeazzo Sforza, Duke of Milan (1469-1494) in 1489 (annulled in 1491 as non consummated) b) John Corvinus, King of Hungary (1473-1510) in 1492​
1b) Matthias II, King of Hungary (1494-1518) married Eleonora Gonzaga (b. 1493)​
2b) Beatrice of Hungary (1495-1502)​
3b) Elizabeth of Hungary (1497-1500)​
4b) John of Hungary (1498-1508)​
5b) miscarriage (1500)​
6b) Katherine of Hungary (b.1502) married Maximilian of Austria, King of Hungary (b. 1497)​
3a) Piero (1472-1491), Prince of Rossano​
4b) Sancha of Aragon (b. 1478)​
5b) Alfonso of Aragon, Duke of Bisceglie and Prince of Salerno (b. 1481) married Lucrezia Borgia (b. 1480) in 1495​
1) Rodrigo (1497-1510)​
2) Alfonso (1499-1505)​
3) Alessandro, Duke of Bisceglie and Prince of Salerno (b. 1500) married Isabella of Aragon (b. 1500)​
4) Lucrezia (b. 1503) married Ercole II d’Este, Duke of Ferrara (b. 1500)​
2a) Eleonora (1450-1493) married Ercole I d'Este, Duke of Ferrara (1431-1505) in 1473
1) Isabella d’Este (b. 1474) married Francesco II Gonzaga, Marquess of Mantua (1466-1519) in 1490​
1) Eleonora (b. 1493) married Matthias II Corvinus, King of Hungary (1494-1518)​
2) Federico II, Marquess of Mantua (b. 1500) married Bianca Sforza (b. 1500)​
3) Ippolita (b. 1503)​
4) Ercole (b. 1505), Cardinal​
5) Ferrante (b. 1507)​
6) Livia (Paola) (b. 1508) nun​
2) Beatrice d’Este (b.1475) married Ludovico I Sforza, Duke of Milan and Bari (b. 1452) in 1491​
1) (Ercole) Massimiliano I, Duke of Milan (b. 1493) married Katherine of Austria and England (b. 1495)​
2) Francesco, Duke of Bari (b. 1495) married Bianca Maria of Naples (b. 1496)​
3) Beatrice (b. 1497) married Lorenzo Borgia, Duke of Florence (b. 1491)​
4) Eleonora (b. 1498) married Ferdinand III, King of Naples (b. 1498)​
5) Bianca (b. 1500) married Federico II Gonzaga, Marquess of Mantua (b. 1500)​
6) Ludovico (b. 1501) married Maria Paleologa, Marchioness of Montferrat (b. 1503)​
7) Isabella (b. 1503) married Charles III, Duke of Savoy (b. 1504)​
3) Alfonso I d’Este, Duke of Ferrara (b. 1476) married a) Anna Maria Sforza (1476-1497) in 1491 b) Charlotte of Naples (1480-1503) in 1498 c) Maddalena Borgia (b. 1490) in 1505​
1a) Eleonora (b. 1497) married Alessandro Borgia, Duke of Urbino (b. 1493)​
2b) Ercole II, Duke of Ferrara (b.1500) married Lucrezia d’Aragona (b. 1503)​
3b) Anna (b. 1502)​
4b) stillborn son (1503)​
5c) Beatrice (b. 1506)​
6c) Ippolito (1508-1515)​
7c) Isabella (1510)​
4) Ferrante d’Este (1477-?)​
5) Ippolito d’Este (b. 1479), Cardinal​
6) Sigismondo d’Este (1480-1524)​
3a) Federico, Prince of Taranto (b. 1452) married a) Anne of Savoy (1455-1480) in 1478 b) Isabella del Balzo, Duchess of Andria (b. 1463) in 1487
1a) Charlotte (1480-1502) married Alfonso I d’Este, Duke of Ferrara (b. 1476) in 1498​
2b) Ferdinando, Prince of Taranto and Duke of Andria (b. 1488) married Lucrezia Borgia (b. 1495)​
3b) Giulia d’Aragona (1492-1505)​
4b) Alfonso (1499-1507)​
5b) Isabella (b. 1500) married Alessandro d’Aragona, Prince of Salerno and Duke of Bisceglie (b. 1500)​
4a) Giovanni (1456-1485) Cardinal
5a) Beatrice (1475-1508) married Matthias Corvinus, King of Hungary (1443-1490) in 1476
6a) Francesco, Duke of Sant Angelo (1461-1486)
7b) Giovanna (b. 1478) married Ferdinand II of Aragon, King of Naples (b. 1469) in 1497
8b) Carlo (1480–1486)
 
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I do not know if I will continue the main story now...
Trees and some posts on some characters or specific countries are still likely and feel free to ask as butterflies effects are pretty big...
Still someone surprised by this developments?
(France screw, Habsburg wank is pretty usual for me, plus continuing Italian Renaissance and Borgia wank)
 
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I will confess to being curious, with Edward IV's marriage proposals for his kids, there's going to be a lot of first cousin marriages in the next generation, no? Which means that papal dispensations will be required for all of them. And Edward IV will posthumously, TTL, become the "Grandfather of Europe" :)

Cecily of York (1469-?) married James IV, King of Scotland(b.1473) in 1488
  1. see under James

Where's Jamie hiding?
 
I will confess to being curious, with Edward IV's marriage proposals for his kids, there's going to be a lot of first cousin marriages in the next generation, no? Which means that papal dispensations will be required for all of them. And Edward IV will posthumously, TTL, become the "Grandfather of Europe" :)



Where's Jamie hiding?
I still need to do Spain and Scotland... they will arrive when I will have them...

you can look forward to trees for Spain, Portugal, Navarre, Scotland, France, and Poland/Bohemia...

Papal dispensations will be pretty easy to get in this age as OTL...
Edward IV can get that title but I can not see first cousins matches between his grandchildren: the only match who is still possible is one between James V of Scotland and Elizabeth of Austria-England, but she is much more likely to be married elsewhere
 
Maddalena Borgia
Being granddaughter of both Lorenzo “the Magnificent” de’Medici and Pope Alexander VI, both considered by many as new men and being married (as third wife) to the heir of one of the oldest Italian dynasties was not easy...
Still Maddalena knew everything about how rule and organize splendid courts (her parents’ Urbino and Florence, ruled by her brother were a testimony of the greatness reached by the heirs of the union between the Borgias and the Medicis) and that made her at least accepted in Ferrara without too much troubles. Well that and the fact who her father was one the most powerful and surely the most dangerous of the Italian rulers so Duke Ercole decided who a triple alliance with the Borgias was the best way to secure his domains and married his son, widowed for the second time, to the eldest daughter of Cesare, offering his own granddaughter for the younger brother of her new step-mother (heir of his father’s Urbino) and marrying his grandson (heir of Ferrara) to Cesare‘s niece (ignoring the illegitimacy of both parents of the girl, as Ercole was keen to do, she was a good match being the great-niece of his late wife and an Aragon of Naples). Maddalena had never any illusion about her wedding so she was not disappointed at all and Alfonso, while initially reluctant was positively impressed by his new wife, who was a well know beauty (like all the Borgia women as her younger sister, her paternal aunt and the daughter of the latter, all called Lucrezia, also were renowned beauties), well educated, smart and determinate so they were an happy couple and she had not made regret her long late mother-in-law as Duchess of Ferrara. Her greatest regret was not being able to give a second living son to her husband (but at least her cousin/stepdaughter-in-law Lucrezia secured the line with three sons) and who her only child to become adult was a third daughter for Alfonso... Maddalena in the end was a popular Duchess and a patron of the arts who contributed to the splendor of Ferrara and of the house of Este, who well deserved to be counted among the great ladies of the Italian Renaissance (and she was related to many of them for either birth or marriage)
 
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Lucrezia Borgia, “the Elder”
Lucrezia Borgia, only daughter and likely the most beloved child, of Pope Alexander VI by his mistress Vannozza Cattanei (who is not the infamous “Lady of Rome” or “Bride of Christ” of Alexander VI’s papacy. That was Giulia Farnese, sister of the future Pope Paul III, who became Alexander’s mistress in 1488 when she was only 14 years old) was married at 15 years old to the 14 years old Alfonso of Aragon, Duke of Bisceglie and Prince of Salerno, who was the illegimate son of Alfonso II of Naples, sealing the friendship and alliance between their fathers. Lucrezia had the luck of being married to a powerful lord in a beautiful court who remained stable and almost unchallenged, so she was able to spend a peaceful life and both her surviving children made very good weddings as her son Alessandro married a legitimate member of the royal family of Naples (Isabella of Taranto, the youngest daughter of Federico, Duke of Taranto and Andria, second son of King Ferrante I) while her daughter, another Lucrezia, was the third princess of Naples (and the second Borgia, after her cousin Maddalena, third wife of Alfonso I) to marry in Ferrara (the other two were Eleonora of Naples, elder daughter of King Ferrante I and only wife of Duke Ercole I, then Charlotte of Taranto, only child of Federico by his first wife, who was the second wife of Alfonso I and mother of his heir, who in turn married Lucrezia of Bisceglie). This Lucrezia Borgia was remembered for her beauty and culture but specially for her piety and the great love between her and her husband, and also as sometime hostess for her father, as Lucrezia and Alfonso were used to divide their times between the courts of Rome and Naples and their own lands.
Sometimes she is called Lucrezia Borgia ”the Elder” for better distinguishing her from her namesake niece Lucrezia Borgia “the Younger”, who was the youngest daughter of Cesare and Maddalena Borgia and likewise married in the extended royal family of Naples as her husband was Ferrante of Aragon, Prince of Taranto and Duke of Andria (brother of Alessandro of Bisceglie‘s wife Isabella).




*as the alliance with Rome and Milan prevented the French Kings Charles VIII and Louis XII from effectively trying to claim the crown of Naples and while Ferdinand II of Aragon once tried to invade Naples (in the short timeframe in which neither his sister or her daughter were Queen Consorts in Naples), killing King Alfonso II in battle his invasion in the end was unsuccessful and the later wedding between his niece Giovanna to the new King Ferdinand II, after Queen Bianca Maria death, put the end on that once for all.
 
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Spain and Portugal tree
Ferdinand II, King of Aragon (1452-1518) married a) Isabella I, Queen of Castile (1451-1504) in 1469
  1. Isabella (b. 1470) married Alfonso, Prince of Portugal (1475-1491) in 1490 without issues
  2. miscarried son (1475)
  3. John, Prince of Asturias and Girona (1478-1497) married Catherine of York(b.1479) in 1495
    1. Isabella II, Queen of Spain (b.1497) married John III, King of Spain (b.1497)
    2. Joanna (1498)
  4. Joanna (b.1479) married Manuel I, King of Portugal (b.1469) in 1496
    1. John III, King of Spain (b.1497) married Isabella II, Queen of Spain (b.1497)
    2. Isabella (b. 1499)
    3. Beatrice (b. 1501)
    4. Edward (1503-1505)
    5. Henry (b. 1506)
    6. Joanna (b. 1508)
  5. Maria (b.1482) married Edward VI, King of England (b.1485) in 1498
    1. see under Edward​
  6. Anna (1482) twin of Maria
  7. Catherine (b.1485)
 
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