Keynes' Cruisers Volume 2

No husband for Tatiana. The ugliness of being a single soviet woman cripple in the 40s through 80s will compete with her war experiences in terms of monstrousness and the cruelty of the everyday.
 
Shit, I still damn near dive for the deck every time I hear fireworks and I haven't been in the military in 13 years
In my army reserve days I spent a weekend of intense Infantry Minor Tactics. Monday lunchtime I was walking along a city street when some little so & so blew up and burst a paper bag behind me. I had to physically stop myself from diving behind the nearest tree.
 
In my army reserve days I spent a weekend of intense Infantry Minor Tactics. Monday lunchtime I was walking along a city street when some little so & so blew up and burst a paper bag behind me. I had to physically stop myself from diving behind the nearest tree.
Yeah, I did 3 tours in Iraq with Marine Recon...
 
In my army reserve days I spent a weekend of intense Infantry Minor Tactics. Monday lunchtime I was walking along a city street when some little so & so blew up and burst a paper bag behind me. I had to physically stop myself from diving behind the nearest tree.
Yeah, I did 3 tours in Iraq with Marine Recon...
There's a reason they quite sounding the "noon siren" after GW1 :)

While in Germany post GW1 my wife was driving on an Army post and the siren went off... Had someone almost give himself a concusion by trying to dive under her moving Geo Storm. (Ground clearance is less than 4 inches on a good day :) )

Aside:
We got so used to "Saddam's Wakeup Call" (Scud launch) at 3am so that you only came awake enough to put your hand on your mask carrier, then if you heard the double-thump of a Patriot launch you 'wokeup' and put on your mask. To this day I have no idea what the actual sequence of events was but according to my wife I was sleeping soundly, (midnight shift, so this was noon) when the base siren went off. I stirred and put my hand next to the bed, then there was a loud "whump-whump" and I sat up with my eyes still closed and lifted the cat to my face, grabbed his tail and jerked it back...

Must have been a good seal because she swears she could hardly hear me screaming as the kittly dug in and held on...

Randy
 
There's a reason they quite sounding the "noon siren" after GW1 :)

While in Germany post GW1 my wife was driving on an Army post and the siren went off... Had someone almost give himself a concusion by trying to dive under her moving Geo Storm. (Ground clearance is less than 4 inches on a good day :) )

Aside:
We got so used to "Saddam's Wakeup Call" (Scud launch) at 3am so that you only came awake enough to put your hand on your mask carrier, then if you heard the double-thump of a Patriot launch you 'wokeup' and put on your mask. To this day I have no idea what the actual sequence of events was but according to my wife I was sleeping soundly, (midnight shift, so this was noon) when the base siren went off. I stirred and put my hand next to the bed, then there was a loud "whump-whump" and I sat up with my eyes still closed and lifted the cat to my face, grabbed his tail and jerked it back...

Must have been a good seal because she swears she could hardly hear me screaming as the kittly dug in and held on...

Randy
I have not had even 1/100th of 1% of the experiences of yourself and Ssgtc. Even with my extremely limited experience - training sticks.
 
In my army reserve days I spent a weekend of intense Infantry Minor Tactics. Monday lunchtime I was walking along a city street when some little so & so blew up and burst a paper bag behind me. I had to physically stop myself from diving behind the nearest tree.
This is completely not similar but feels related: I used to play a shitload of Battlefield:1942 + Desert Combat mod. I remember walking down the street one day around 2003 or so, more than slightly drunk and moderately sleep-deprived from a night of gaming, and when a helicopter flew over at low altitude, I seriously flailed my arms around a bit trying to quickly switch to a Stinger and scope-in so I could shoot it down.
 
I have not had even 1/100th of 1% of the experiences of yourself and Ssgtc. Even with my extremely limited experience - training sticks.
Exactly why most militaries go with "Train as you fight, fight as you train" as a maxium :)

it can be annoying at times but when you really NEED it... :D

Randy
 
Story 2220
Fort Devens, Massachusetts, September 20, 1943

The men of the 77th Infantry Division were hard at work. They were due to move to the Pacific theatre at the start of November. In order for the entire division with attachments to make it to San Diego in time for ten days and six practice landings of the advanced amphibious assault school, the first battalion needed to be on a train by Saturday and the last unit, currently scheduled to be the divisional band, would be on their first train to Albany by the 30th.

Even as the training camp was becoming eerily empty with the firing ranges quiet and only a few sergeants running recalcitrant privates into the ground as the New England draftees were still being trained for replacement pools, hundreds of construction workers were busy. Plans had been made to convert some of the temporary barracks into low security prisoner of war camps. The big bags from Tunisia and Sicily were coming over in liners now. The first few waves had been distributed to bases down south or in the Canadian plains. 10,000 Italians were scheduled to arrive right after Thanksgiving and the base needed to be ready to process the prisoners, provide basic health screenings and then arrange for paroles for the men who wanted to work.
 
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Fort Devens, Massachusetts, September 20, 1943

The men of the 77th Infantry Division were hard at work. They were due to move to the Pacific theatre at the start of November.
In OTL they arrived in Hawaii in March 1944. These updates are wonderful for comparisons to the OTL.
 
Story 2220
Bletchley Park, September 20, 1943

In several huts, new machines were being installed. An observer with the appropriate clearance who had reason to walk between those buildings would have heard an amazingly creative proliferation of swearing in three or four English dialects and a dozen more accents. The finicky bombes and colossal collections of circuits and gears required both delicate precision and brute strength to install. The first batches of updated machines had been active since late summer. This new batch would speed up encryption against the most recent German codes by an amazing factor. Now the crews just had to make sure that everything was connected appropriately and working right. Three machines had already failed the post-installation trials. They had been first in line for repairs and upkeep; new valves and a replacement wire were enough to get them working correctly.

In London, a far more important debate was being held. The ULTRA intelligence secret had paid tremendous dividends since 1940. But every time it was used in a specific case risked blowing the entire secret. Foreknowledge of today's events had to be weighed against the loss of foreknowledge of future events. A long series of intercepts from all over Italy had been decoded. That intelligence was being blended with recon flights, reports from observers on the ground from both people who had cousins and "guys" in Italy as well as controlled agents and discussions between diplomats in neutral capitals --- all agreed that something seemed to be happening behind the scenes. Two intercepts from earlier in the day gave a time of action; 2:00 AM Sunday morning.

Could the Allies front run their response or would the price of losing ULTRA be worth a day to prepare?
 
Story 2221
Leningrad, September 21, 1943

She woke up again. All she could feel was a dry mouth and pain. Her leg was ruined. The nurse had explained to her that she would eventually be able to more hobble rather than walk without assistance. She would need at least a cane for the rest of her life if all went well and if the state could spare the resources for physical therapy. She was one of hundreds of thousands of wounded soldiers who were in line for rehabilitation. She might be able to skip some of the line due to her successes and her medals, but even then, resources for the recovering wounded were scarce as every sinew of the state strained to throw back the fascists. Insuring that she could walk would take a worker away from a munitions plant for a day.

The nurse came by an hour later to clean her dressing and hand her a book to read. Tatianna did not see her caretaker's eyes as she looked over the wound site; an infection was spreading. The nurse hurried back to the doctor and soon sulfa drugs were being spread. They could only hope that the British drugs would work; a few shipments of a new American wonderdrug had arrived at the hospital, but that was being saved for extreme cases. If the wounded sniper did not respond, more surgery would be needed.
 
Could the Allies front run their response or would the price of losing ULTRA be worth a day to prepare?
The good old intelligence conundrum.

Either risk the secret getting out while saving lives or having to let them face the grim reaper to keep the secret....
 
She hasn’t been finished being used yet


would take a worker away from a munitions plant for a day.
If the decision has been to gain a focus character for behind the lines Soviet life;

did not see her caretaker's eyes as she looked over the wound site; an infection was spreading
Where the union might survive, but harder, and lack perhaps the depth of buffer, or the magnamity (or economic capacity) to allow the buffer states a period of democracy while soviet citizens are starving more often than historically;

a new American wonderdrug had arrived at the hospital, but that was being saved for extreme cases. If the wounded sniper did not respond, more surgery would be needed
Then she is in for very hard use indeed before being given a ground floor flat, the impossibility of marriage, and a social obligation to proactively inform on her neighbours.
 

Ramp-Rat

Donor
@Draconis
Sorry but you are wrong, Fleming didn’t invent penicillin, he didn’t even discover it, others had done that. What he did do was observe it’s anti bacterial properties, though he didn’t do a lot with this observation, and had given up on penicillin. It was a team at Oxford who did most of the work to prove its effectiveness and started its production and how to isolate it. Unfortunately they didn’t have the money or facilities to get it into serious production, and their leader didn’t believe in patenting, so failed to do so. While he couldn’t have patented penicillin, he could have patented the production method. It being war time the British went to America for assistance, and an American government scientist who wasn’t able to patent his work in America, realised that he could do so in Britain, and did, and he made millions.

RR.
 
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@Draconis
Sorry but you are wrong, Fleming didn’t invent penicillin, he didn’t even discover it, others had done that. What he did do was observe it’s anti bacterial properties, though he didn’t do a lot with this observation, and had given up on penicillin. It was a team at Oxford who did most of the work to prove its effectiveness and started its production and how to isolate it. Unfortunately they didn’t have the money or facilities to get it into serious production, and their leader didn’t believe in patenting, so failed to do so. While he couldn’t have patented penicillin, he could have patented the production method. It being war time the British went to America for assistance, and an American government scientist who wasn’t able to patent his work in America, realised that he could do so in Britain, and did, and he made millions.RR.
Are you sure you are not splitting hairs?

"Fleming was modest about his part in the development of penicillin, describing his fame as the "Fleming Myth" and he praised Florey and Chain for transforming the laboratory curiosity into a practical drug. Fleming was the first to discover the properties of the active substance, giving him the privilege of naming it: penicillin. He also kept, grew, and distributed the original mould for twelve years, and continued until 1940 to try to get help from any chemist who had enough skill to make penicillin. But Sir Henry Harris said in 1998: "Without Fleming, no Chain; without Chain, no Florey; without Florey, no Heatley; without Heatley, no penicillin."[22] "

I think the Wikipedia article is accurate. With a long list of references.
 
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