Keynes' Cruisers Volume 2

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: After 1900' started by fester, Sep 13, 2018.

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  1. Driftless Geezer

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2011
    Location:
    Out in the Driftless Area
    I live close to the Mississippi way upstream in Wisconsin. I think the river has been out of its banks (at or close to flood stage) since the ice went out in March - and it's not looking to go down much for a while. Without looking up the statistics, I don't remember it being so high for so long a duration. All that water has to go downstream yet....
     
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  2. Butchpfd Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2009
    Same situation here for the Illinois, smaller rivers and creeks cannot drain farmlands are flooded or too soggy to plant. At this time according to a farmer friend of our, Illinois farmers have 11 to 15% of crops planted as opposed to 80+% on the average by this time. Then the Illinois can barely drain into the Mississippi, because the Missouri is still high!
     
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  3. jlckansas Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    I live in Kansas, folks are fishing off their front porches, the bad thing is they are catching pretty good size fish.
     
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  4. TonyA Curmudgeon like, but nastier

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2015
    Location:
    South Florida
    Like your statement, but, shouldn't it be, ...good news...catching some pretty decent fish, ...bad news...they're fishing off their front porch...
    This has been another pretty dismal flood and tornado year, and, for Pete's sake, there's more left. Tough times, what's next, earthquakes and volcanos?
     
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  5. sloreck Grunt Bear

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2008
    Location:
    Midwest
    Where I live, while no major disasters, relatively minor flooding but much more than usual and May has >2x usual rain.
     
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  6. merlin Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2007
    Location:
    Cardiff
    Interesting - when does the 'Hurricane Season' start? With above average rainwater already back-up-stream what happens when there's a deluge downstream nearer the coast? I suspect the waters will take, much, much longer to clear.
     
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  7. TonyA Curmudgeon like, but nastier

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2015
    Location:
    South Florida
    And let's hope it doesn't get any worse, right? By the by, 1 June opens hurricane season officially, to answer Merlin's question, but we usually have one in the can by then...
     
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  8. sloreck Grunt Bear

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2008
    Location:
    Midwest
    The problem is with the ground saturated, rain pretty much goes directly into creeks and streams, to larger waterways etc. Also, levees, which are made of earth and not covered in waterproof material for the most part also become saturated and therefore weaker and less resistant to breakage. The ground under concrete structures can become saturated, again weakening things. As bad as this can be where I am, pretty close to the headwaters of the major drainage systems, it obviously gets worse the further downstream you go in terms of volume of water in the rivers. Fortunately where I am we are about as insulated from any hurricane related effects as you can get in the USA.
     
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  9. Butchpfd Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2009
    Officially Hurricane season starts June 1st. It is the U.S. Southeast, and imo Louisiana in particular, that will suffer the most. Storms in the Gulf will bring more water to the Southern end of already swollen river systems, especially the Mississippi River.
     
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  10. sloreck Grunt Bear

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2008
    Location:
    Midwest
    If a really big one hits the Miami/Dade area,look out. Parts of Miami now get water in the streets with an exceptional high tide so a storm at the right time of the tide cycle would cause massive flooding and a surge. Florida is pretty waterlogged normally, unless you have a drought and another problem you could get is salt infiltration of the water table, making the water undrinkable...
     
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  11. vl100butch Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2014
    Location:
    Madison, MS
    We normally don't have any storm activity until the August-September time frame...if we go from 1 Aug to 30 Sept without a hurricane, a big sigh of relief is heard all along the Gulf Coast...
     
  12. TonyA Curmudgeon like, but nastier

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2015
    Location:
    South Florida
    Beginning to be true of some sections of Ft. Lauderdale/central Broward county as well.
     
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  13. Driftless Geezer

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2011
    Location:
    Out in the Driftless Area
    I just saw this nugget from NASA on Facebook - ties in with our current tangential conversation:
    https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/i...oltn5njouq42DszHgXWEbFuCEHbrdMK5BPHWkQmXFLnAI
    Groundwater moisture.GIF
    The map key didn't transfer.... Dark Blue indicates Shallow groundwater wetness percentile in the 98% level comparing to the period from 1948 to 2012. Light blue is the 70th percentile. Basically the central and eastern US are saturated...
     
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  14. TonyA Curmudgeon like, but nastier

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2015
    Location:
    South Florida
    Doesn't bode well for the forthcoming summer...
     
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  15. sloreck Grunt Bear

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2008
    Location:
    Midwest
    In Wisconsin the farmers are waaaay behind in their planting because the soil is too wet to have seed or be plowed. Unless things dry up somewhat and less rain, some crops won't go in at all...
     
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  16. Winestu Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2017
    Given what happened last year in the Mid-Atlantic, I can only say “D’huh!” (No insult intended)
    It’s because of the huge rainfall last year that the pollen level is so high this year.
     
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  17. RanulfC Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2014
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  18. formion Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2011
    Who are the co-authors of Keynes' Cruisers?

    Edit: I guess you meant co-authors from other timelines
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2019
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  19. sloreck Grunt Bear

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2008
    Location:
    Midwest
    Perhaps the Batfish will cruise somehow to the Rio Grande to aid the effort there...
     
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  20. vl100butch Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2014
    Location:
    Madison, MS
    *bangshead*

    I remember when Batfish was the USNR training sub in New Orleans...
     
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