Keynes' Cruisers Volume 2

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: After 1900' started by fester, Sep 13, 2018.

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  1. NHBL Long Time Member, CMII

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    Jan 1, 2004
    If they're just launched to clear the slip, they would have a lot less superstructure.
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4f/USSKentuckyBB-66.jpg
     
  2. fester Well-Known Member

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    Tooth and tail. A Commonwealth infantry division had a line strength of 13,000-16,000. The divisional slice (total manpower/total divisions) which accounts for logistics, line of communication, corps artillery, trainers etc, was often well over 50,000 men in uniform to get a single division at the front at a given time.

    The Belgian evacuees did not all elect to stay and fight. Many were repatriated and others were REMFs who had value to the LOC but not to the rifle strength of the Free Belgian Forces.
     
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  3. Mike D Well-Known Member

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    My Granddad was 1st Bn. South Lancashire Regiment in the 8th Inf Bde, part of 3(Br) Inf Div in NW Europe (first battalion ashore on Sword Beach, ended their war on 30th April 1945 in Bremen).

    The division had an approximate strength of 17,000 of which roughly 4,500 were in rifle companies in the division's nine infantry battalions.

    In eleven months of combat in Europe the division sustained a total of 16,411 casualties of which 170 were returned to their units before the end of the war.

    (Taken from the book Assault Division, written by a Royal Artillery officer from the division after the war using the unit war diaries).
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2019
  4. Errolwi Well-Known Member

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    They also aren't getting any replacement manpower. You stand up the units that you think that you can sustain over a campaign.
     
  5. mudhead Little-Known Member

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    Don't know if there were any Belgian IPAs at this time. Plenty of other good stuff, though.
     
  6. VF-11 New Member

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    Nov 3, 2017
    That’s interesting, the only stability problem I know of was for Midway after it underwent modification in the 60’s.
     
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  7. Killer in Well-Known Member

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    Sep 8, 2015
    I thought they had some issues because the hull form was based on the Montana class BBs but had alot of more of its weight higher up so had some stability issues.
     
  8. VF-11 New Member

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    Nov 3, 2017
    From what I can fine, it was the SCB101.66 modification. From what I can find part of the problem was the added flight deck area.

    Edit: grammar
     
  9. TonyA Curmudgeon like, but nastier

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    South Florida
    Yeah, thought about that immediately after the post...probably should have reffed those disgusting Brussel sprouts instead of IPA's...live and learn.
     
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  10. Colin Haggett Active Member

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    Nov 20, 2017
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    Melbourne, Australia

    The nearest British consul visited the grave site on a regular basis to place flowers on behalf of his family and fiance. Also to make sure no-one had dug up the corpse to conduct another Autopsy. Sometime in the last couple of decades Major Martin's real name was added to the headstone I believe reading Given Name, Family Name served as Major William Martin. If you look through the various Commonwealth War Cemeteries it is not unusual to find similar entries on head stones.
     
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  11. Coulsdon Eagle Well-Known Member

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    From CWGC: https://www.cwgc.org/find/find-war-dead/results/?cemetery=HUELVA ROMAN CATHOLIC CEMETERY

    Civilian
    MICHAEL, GLYNDWR
    Died 24/01/1943

    Aged 34

    Civilian

    Mr Michael posthumously served his country during the Second World War under the assumed rank and name of Major William Martin, Royal Marines, date of death given as 24th April 1943. These details are recorded on the original ledger which marks the grave. History knows him as "THE MAN WHO NEVER WAS". .
     
  12. Some Bloke Well-Known Member

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    Looks like the Bengal famine's been mitigated at the least.
     
  13. Threadmarks: Story 1960

    fester Well-Known Member

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    Leningrad, March 24, 1943



    Tatianna checked her rifle one last time. She glanced at her spotter. She took in the rest of the rifle battalion. They had been on the front line for two weeks. Little beyond normal patrolling and constant vigilance had happened. A fascist company had tried to take an observation post and that evolved into a six hour fire fight. The fascist platoon was able to eventually retreat once half a dozen tanks had arrive.d

    She pressed her back up against the wall of the trench complex. Her helmet that she seldom wore was heavy on her head. Someone a few meters down the line started to talk about the relief that he was getting on the next rotation to the rear. She could use some relief too, it had been a while. Suddenly the sound that the entire battalion had been waiting for erupted. Four dozen guns started to fire. Half were firing smoke, the other half were firing high explosive shells at mapped German positions. She got onto her feet and began to jog to the rear. They had been relieved, and now the front was some other battalion’s problem

    Two hours later, she had hot soup, dry socks and a soft bed all to herself.
     
  14. RyderWest Spintop Isolated

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    Chances for Tatianna are getting better... although she could still catch a bullet from there to the border.
     
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  15. Curtain Jerker Well-Known Member

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    Three things that make everyone's life just a little bit better.
     
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  16. Cryhavoc101 Well-Known Member

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    Thats even more sobering when you consider that the majority of those 16,411 casualties for the division would have came from among those 4,500 PBIs in the rifle companies :'(

    Thats an almost 4 x turnover in 11 months
     
  17. Threadmarks: Story 1961

    fester Well-Known Member

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    Palapare, Celebes Dutch East Indies March 25, 1943


    The work gangs cheered. The last steel mat was in place. The bomber field had already accepted the first B-17s weeks ago. Then it was a narrow forty eight hundred foot long single strip without hardstands. Now, the main runway was one hundred and sixty feet wide by sixty two hundred feet long. The taxi-way was also capable of launching fully loaded bombers into the sky. Hard stands were available. Mechanics were operating under tents now while the promise of hangers had been made as soon as the next supply convoy arrived.

    Even as the tired construction engineers came back from lunch, thirty four bombers out of the thirty six launched entered the landing pattern. The raid on Tarakan seemed to have been successful. By now, the Japanese could mainly oppose the bombers with anti-aircraft guns. Their fighters could seldom get the altitude advantage in time, and when they did, they still needed to go through several squadrons of Mustangs or Lightnings which tagged along with the bombers. Any Oscar pilot that survived the fighters then had to face a wall of steel and lead erupting from the flanks of the bombers. A skilled man could do that once, twice, and even ten times, but each time, the chances of doing it safely decreased as the supporting cast was thinner and less well trained.
     
  18. Threadmarks: Story 1962

    fester Well-Known Member

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    Sydney, Australia March 25, 1943


    He watched the healthier men play. He had a dozen scars digging into his chest, his shoulder and his flank. Another few chunks of meat in his thigh were still healing. Tom Jaroshek sat on the bleachers as the Australians who were in the general rehabilitation hospital had taken a bunch of Marines out for a friendly game of rugby. It was different but not too different from football. Maybe the boys in the Mon Valley would play this game once he got home. The docs and the nurses said he had another thirty days in Sydney before they would let him go. After that, men with his wounds either headed to California or Hawaii to take the administrative load off of men who could still fight. He sighed as he wished for a Coke and a pretty girl.
     
  19. RyderWest Spintop Isolated

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    At least the Jaroschek boys are all alive.

    Although... where are the Sullivan brothers? Of course USS Juneau is still afloat.
     
  20. vl100butch Well-Known Member

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    but will the Navy show a bit of common sense and split them up???
     
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