Jefferson's Anti-Slavery Crisis: Alternate History of the U.S.

The Deep South wouldn't be Dixieland in TTL, at least not this early. The nickname originally belonged to New Orleans and hadn't been invented yet. After the Louisiana Purchase, bank notes were bilingual and the $10 notes said both "ten" and "dix". Dixie came from the notes being called "dixies".
I thought it was a reference to the Mason-Dixon Line.

You learn something new every day.
 
I wonder how the development of Canada would progress differently in this world, since Loyalists in British North America still have a foothold in the South.
 
REally good - the compromise and working together on New Orleans is good, it shows they are trying to be friendly while at the same time the U.S. doesn't feel too threatened and is growing,

Are escaped slaves coming North to the U.S. a lot? Natives escaping the Trail of Tears? Trying to remain neutral, they probably still allow them to remain in America, but just don't try to push for abolition. Which will make thigns interesting when Britain finally outlaws slavery.

1836 will also be the 50th year, starign in September, of the United States since the Constitution was voted on - I wonder if the Second Great Awkening will cause some preachers to connect this to the Old Testament Jubilee Year, whch was always the 50th year (after 7 periods of 7 years).

You have the British and Spanish each having Florida - was one East and the other West?
 
REally good - the compromise and working together on New Orleans is good, it shows they are trying to be friendly while at the same time the U.S. doesn't feel too threatened and is growing,

Are escaped slaves coming North to the U.S. a lot? Natives escaping the Trail of Tears? Trying to remain neutral, they probably still allow them to remain in America, but just don't try to push for abolition. Which will make thigns interesting when Britain finally outlaws slavery.

1836 will also be the 50th year, starign in September, of the United States since the Constitution was voted on - I wonder if the Second Great Awkening will cause some preachers to connect this to the Old Testament Jubilee Year, whch was always the 50th year (after 7 periods of 7 years).

You have the British and Spanish each having Florida - was one East and the other West?
Thank you.
1836 was very much intentional. Also, I might edit the Florida section. There isn't a massive floodtide of escaped slaves. The fear of slave escapes is overblown tbh. It might escalate closer to 1836 but I'll need to write that. I think Spain ceded the entire Florida for the cash sum.

Edit: Update is here. Chapter 5 is up; Roadmaps were revised (bold texts = revisions)
 
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Chapter 5: American Military Situations
Chapter 5: American military situations

The French, ironically enough, would soon have a problem with the United States of America. France had supported the American Revolution… for a price. John Adams, one of the chief American diplomats of the time, stated that the U.S. would have difficulty paying the French debt. A previous argument that the debts were old to an older regime fell apart once the situation in France stabilized; in 1798, the French Foreign Minister Talleyrand wanted the U.S. to continue paying the war debts of the American Revolution, and in higher amounts. The United States of America also had a problem with the policy of impressment, where French and British ships seized and captured American ships and their crews. Complaints arose from the United States government, but they fell on deaf ears. As a result, the United States prepared for war if necessary, but attempted to avoid war via diplomacy.

A worsening international situation spurred the professionalization of the U.S. Army and Navy. Defensive fortifications started to be produced along the United States of America’s borders with Canada and Carolina. Attempts at playing off one major European power against another also saw action. The United States of America desperately wanted to stay neutral, and it attempted to get the other European powers as a standoff against France and Britain. The United States of America did get the support of Austria and Russia against France and Britain, although Austria was widely considered a ‘paper lion’—strong on paper, weak in practice. Russia was also considered a ‘crouching bear’—strong when defending itself, weaker when attacking or defending someone else. Russia and Austria had disagreements with France since they feared French revolutionaries trying to spread their ideals to them. They knew what happened in Prussia and in Spain—rebellions in the name of overthrowing a monarch. They did not want that to happen to them. The U.S. did manage to successfully play off the foreign powers, who may have been threats to it. As such, the United States of America was largely left to its own devices in settling the West, and trade in peacetime. This lack of foreign entanglements partially contributed to an "Era of Good Feelings" where the country was humming along smoothly. Two political parties would develop, the Federalists, and the Democratic-Republicans, with the former supposedly having more moneyed interests and the latter supposedly being in favor of the common man.


A small war would break out over Barbary pirates seizing American ships. The United States of America built up a navy, which had hardly existed in the years prior, and sent it under the command of John Paul Jones in 1801. The U.S. Navy performed admirably against the Barbary pirates, with foreign countries being surprised at the efficacy of the U.S. Navy. The Battle of Tripoli, where U.S. Marines performed their first success by invading Tripoli and forcing a surrender, as the U.S. Navy wiped out the resident Barbary Pirate navy, led to the eventual fall of the Barbary ‘Pirate States’ because no one feared them anymore after the Battle of Tripoli. The U.S. Naval buildup had also contributed to the vanishing of impressment by 1810, as the United States of America would now be able to hold its own in a naval war against Britain or France.

Aaron Burr would be disgraced in the United States of America during this period, for being too soft against the British. He was considered a British pawn, probably because he tried to ignore the impressment issue. As a result, he was widely considered ‘persona non grata’ for accused cowardice. Rumors also started to fly around him, from bribery to extortion, none of which could be fully proven, but it was enough to send Burr out of the United States of America, not wanting to be laughed at by everyone. He could return, but decided not to since everyone would make fun of him and no one would accept him. As a result, Burr was seen taking a tour of Europe, and also arrived in British Columbia for a time.

Clean, Old-Fashioned Hate

The expression “Clean, Old-Fashioned Hate” was surfacing around this time. Large waves of immigration started to arrive to the now-industrializing USA, and were met with much skepticism. When large amounts of land still existed on the frontier, most of the immigrants were tolerated, at least there. But it was in the cities where the most skepticism about immigrants existed. Many existing workers feared they would be pushed out of work. The most hatred was directed to the Irish immigrants; fear of Catholicism was a main factor in this. Many enterprises such as the formation of the Erie Canal starting in 1817 required large amounts of labor, often sourced from recent immigrants. Admittedly, the construction of the canal was fraught with problems. Delays, disease outbreaks, and worst of all, abuses of labor. Company thugs often appeared to force the workers to continue operating. The appalling rates of death on the job would soon reach the ears of the American public, but proponents of the canal won out. Nonetheless, crafty politicians started to realize that the recent immigrant vote could be useful for their own ambitions. They often used graft at this point, leading to the formation of the first political machines.


The immigration to the United States of America did not translate to more immigration to ‘Columbia’, which was the British Deep South. This area did have some immigrants, especially after the British attempted to resettle Irishmen there to clear up room in Ireland. The “Irish Clearances” would allow for further developments of the Agricultural Revolution in those cleared lands, and other parts of the "Irish Clearances" were used to make factories. There was a laboratory in Ireland, built from small parts of these lands, and they would be used to experiment with varying agricultural practices. Promises of better land, more supplies, and an easier chance to feed their families often reached the Irish, and they would supposedly get these promises if they moved to 'Columbia'
 
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I think you're jumping the gun with a border treaty so early considering the bad blood between the Brits and the USA. They haven't even nailed down an equivalent of the Jay Treaty yet, and with a British south as well as a British Canada they're probably going to feel emboldened in the Great Lakes, not less so.

This USA is also going to be much more poor out of the gate without the southern land sales and cotton used to buoy the currency.
 
I think you're jumping the gun with a border treaty so early considering the bad blood between the Brits and the USA. They haven't even nailed down an equivalent of the Jay Treaty yet, and with a British south as well as a British Canada they're probably going to feel emboldened in the Great Lakes, not less so.

This USA is also going to be much more poor out of the gate without the southern land sales and cotton used to buoy the currency.
Ok thanks. I'd nail down an equivalent of the Jay Treaty back... maybe in Chapter 1 when I edit it? Also, I could definitely move the land sales later.
 
Chapter 1 had a small revision with the Jay treaty, and some expansion on some other paragraphs. That's the update. I might also update chapter 3 today.
 
If you can't tell by my name, I would really like to see George H. Thomas be a hero in this TL.
Thanks for the feedback. I'm not at the 1860s yet but I'm thinking he's the guy that is responsible for catching the "Wolf Legion" hate group. More will come in the 1860s Chapter, whenever it arrives.
 
So this chapter came a bit early. Do you have any characters that you would like as heroes or villains? (Abraham Lincoln and Otto Von Bismarck are already planned for).
Nelson Mandela has always been a favourite of mine, when you get there. Oh, and is there any chance you can save Princess Charlotte of Wales, please? You've already made a good start by saving Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette from the guillotine...
 
Nelson Mandela has always been a favourite of mine, when you get there. Oh, and is there any chance you can save Princess Charlotte of Wales, please? You've already made a good start by saving Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette from the guillotine...
I can save Charlotte... Mandela that is way in the future. Thanks
 
Next chapter... hopefully sometime tomorrow. If not, then it's on Thursday. Thanks for the feedback. I might have to change the Spanish and Prussian revolutions as well since I'm thinking of "Fires across Europe in the early 1800s"
 
Fires Across Spain (A Mini-Narrative)
The French Revolution was largely over by 1795. But across Europe, the waves of revolution would only begin. Witness Spain, for instance. Here is a story about a person who really was there. A narrative, so to speak.

The year was 1797. Colonel Wellesley and his men watched as the sun barely peeked across the horizon. With the permission of the King of Spain, Charles IV, a British Army composed of hardened veterans landed in Spain. They were there because the British Empire did not want Spain falling into revolution, or worse, falling into the French camp. The British—French rivalry was still going strong, and it was in British interests to keep the status quo in Spain. Spain might have distrusted Britain now in terms of colonial expansion, but Spain allying with France was even worse; therefore, Britain would attempt to improve relations with Spain by helping the King of Spain crush a rebellion at home. This army was supposed to find the Spanish rebels and destroy them, but so far, their journey led them to this part of the countryside. Those rebels could run quickly, Colonel Wellesley thought. How was it that the British Army was going to find them? The answer would arrive in the form of local cavalry scouts belonging to the Spanish Army. They had spotted a rebel camp not far from here, but quick marches would be needed to seize the opportunity.

The high command ordered the British army there to pack up and march quickly towards the direction of the rebel camp. Everyone followed the vanguard, and at a blistering pace. With luck, the rebels would be caught unaware. That was exactly what happened, as the Spanish rebels did not expect a fight so early in the morning. Gunshots rang in the air as cannons launched their cannonballs at the rebel camp. Colonel Wellesley, directed his troops to get into line formation to confront the enemy. He stood near the front, to further motivate his own men despite the danger. The rebels fired back. However, their discipline was raw and inexperienced compared to the British veterans. A bayonet charge by the front ranks of the British army terrified the Spanish rebels, with many of them trying to run away from the charge and falling over each other.

Due to the open plains, the British line formation was highly effective at clearing out the rebels. Those onrushing lines of soldiers firing their muskets, supported by cavalry and sharpshooters in some cases, caused the rebel army to rout, or flee in a disorderly manner. Many of the rebels ended up dead, with a few taken prisoner. The cohesion of the rebels in the area would never recover. The local Spanish cavalry took very few casualties, and light casualties for the British forces. Colonel Wellesley took time to console his men about the casualties his battalion faced

“Sir?” One of the cavalry scouts had returned to Colonel Wellesley. “The scouts have found a new rebel movement. Maybe you should alert the officers above you?”

“That would be a good idea. I shall check with them. It might be a good idea for you and the other scouts to come as well.”

“Yes, sir.”

The Spanish Rebellion ended miserably, partially due to British intervention, partially because the peasantry had little interest in rebellion. The new ideas of republicanism were ill-suited for Spain due to the lack of support they had outside the middle class which was educated in Enlightenment ideas. Much of the Spanish public hated the King (Charles IV), but did not trust the new idea of republicanism. It did not help that many of the reformers ended up becoming radicals who wanted to do away with the Kingdom altogether and install a presidential republic similar to the United States of America. The USA did view the situation in Spain with interest, but backed off once Britain committed divisions of soldiers there, not wanting further escalation with Britain. There would be no official action concerning Spain.

France viewed the situation in Spain with alarm. They feared the growing British influence in Spain, and the growing suspicion of them in Austria and Prussia. That only left Russia as the European power that they could ally with. The French, therefore, sent several diplomatic overtures to Russia for a (temporary) alliance. A favorable trade deal sealed the pact, as the Russians agreed to help the French in exchange for a good trade deal. France was not merely content with making an alliance with Russia to strengthen itself. The movement in Prussia, where large numbers of people demanded reform, and even some members of the army were thinking of joining them, might be a good place to start.
 
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Where were the French during this? More people would support a more moderate movement looking to reform the current system rather than topple the monarchy for a republic, which would have the French model to base itself off of rather than the US or Revolutionary France OTL. Well now France needs to look for Allies to counter the British, who now have influence throughout the Iberian Peninsula. Russia maybe?
 
Where were the French during this? More people would support a more moderate movement looking to reform the current system rather than topple the monarchy for a republic, which would have the French model to base itself off of rather than the US or Revolutionary France OTL. Well now France needs to look for Allies to counter the British, who now have influence throughout the Iberian Peninsula. Russia maybe?
Thanks for the response. The British-French Rivalry is still going strong, so you're right that France is looking for allies. Russia seems to be the best bet for now, since Britain has its claws in Spain, and Austria doesn't agree with France's ideals. You're right; I'll go update the Spain chapter soon.
I just have more time this weekend to update. As for Spain, the Spanish King was so bad and his son was considered equally bad (and the nobles weren't much better) so there is a movement among the bourgeoisie and intellectuals to tear down the monarchy and establish a republic like the US. A french-style more moderate system wouldn't work since the Spanish King wouldn't accept the changes. I'll add more.
 
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The Duke of Wellington ordered the British army there to pack up and march quickly towards the direction of the rebel camp. Everyone followed the vanguard, and at a blistering pace. With luck, the rebels would be caught unaware. That was exactly what happened, as the Spanish rebels did not expect a fight so early in the morning. It was the genius of Wellington to move an army so quickly and surround the enemy camp before the enemy knew what was going on, while making sure his own army was still in good fighting condition. Gunshots rang in the air as cannons launched their cannonballs at the rebel camp. Captain Heathcliff, like the other captains, directed his troops to get into line formation to confront the enemy. The rebels fired back. However, their discipline was raw and inexperienced compared to the British veterans. A bayonet charge by the front ranks of the British army terrified the Spanish rebels, with many of them trying to run away from the charge and falling over each other.
Arthur Wellesley was only a colonel in 1797. He hadn't even been promoted to Major General yet.
 
Arthur Wellesley was only a colonel in 1797. He hadn't even been promoted to Major General yet.
Thank you. Need to change the characters. I'll get rid of Captain Heathcliff altogether and replace him with Colonel Wellesley. Thanks for pointing that out.
Edit. All Heathcliff mentions are gone and replaced by Colonel Wellesley. I got rid of any "Duke of Wellington" mentions as well, as per Deckhand's advice. I also added a small section in the last chapter about France trying to make an alliance with Russia.
 
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