Jefferson's Anti-Slavery Crisis: Alternate History of the U.S.

An idea of mine is that the Brits should recruit poor "British Columbians" as settlers to Australia along with the prisoners they used in OTL.
 
Note: I'm not sure what to do next. What should I do next? Seems you like the "British Columbia" chapters... I'll probably have that around until the present.
I'm indebted to Murica1776 tbh for that...
 
Far East Part 1
Sorry for the delay/lack of content. More coming very soon.

The European dominance of the Far East had its roots with the Subjugation of India. India had been heavily weakened since the 1730s with the decline of the Mughal Empire. The European powers could become more involved with India as a result. Another reason why European powers could have an easier time getting influence over India was India’s rapid decentralization. After costly wars and invasions, by the mid-1750s, the Mughal emperor lost much of his power. The British East India Company had used large amounts of its profits to start a private army—much later, historians would classify it as one of the first “corporatocracies” in history. British officials made deals with some of the Indian princes for trade and influence in exchange for protection. This would lead to the phrase “Mir Jafar” (synonymous for collaborator or traitor—named after an Indian general who sided with the British Empire). At least in the beginning, these deals were mutually beneficial for both the British East India company and the Indian princes. One reason Europeans wanted trade with India was for spices. The search for spices also brough them to the archipelagos of Southeast Asia, especially the area known as the “spice islands”. Pepper was one of the most important spices for preservation; it helped keep food from being infected by bacteri


By the 1760s, the British had largely driven the French out of India, leaving themselves as the main European power in India. As a result, other European countries decided to have their own Asian colonies elsewhere. For example, the Dutch took parts of Indonesia to form the “Dutch East Indies”, known best for the aforementioned spice production. The French also set up forts in southeast Asia in what would eventually become Thailand. Portugal had its own possessions in the “East Indies” which produced more spices


British expansion in India would continue as the 1700s ended and the 1800s began. British East India Company soldiers started to expand the dominion of their company throughout India as they destroyed the Indian substates that resisted British rule. This took a while, partially due to suspicion at the East India Company. Corruption scandals made it more difficult for the Company to expand since wealth that could have gone into making a bigger army was often diverted into the hands of the company’s “nabobs”. The British East India Company would have direct or indirect control of almost all of India by the early 1850s, but trouble started for the company due to financial problems. Corruption was one problem; another was difficulty in turning a profit due to the costs of keeping down rebellions. As a result, the British Raj replaced the British East India Company in managing India.


China was perhaps the greatest prize in Asia according to the Europeans. Many Chinese goods, like porcelain (called china because it came from China) and tea became very prized in Europe. However, China did not want most European goods, and wanted primarily silver. So long as the European countries had access to large silver reserves, this was not a huge problem. However, the collapse of European colonization in South America made it more difficult for the Europeans to get large amounts of silver. The British looked for a solution—they found it in the opium plant, which was often used for drugs.

Other countries did not want the British Empire to have a free hand in Asia. French, Russian, and even American policymakers wanted their own trade in China. As a result, they attempted their own trade with China, and were stymied by the same ineffective Chinese bureaucracy that was not interested in trade. Merchants often found themselves frustrated with their own governments at a supposed inability to open links to China; everyone was angry at the Chinese for not opening trade. The British Empire had large stocks of opium, which was imported and smuggled into China in exchange for trade goods, especially tea, silk, spices, and porcelain. There was a problem, though. Opium was highly addictive; the Chinese government knew this and banned the substance. In addition, the Chinese government often cracked down on users and dealers of opium. The British demanded the Chinese compensate them for the lost money; the Chinese refused, prompting the British government to send in the Royal Navy in 1842, shortly after the conclusion of the failed adventure in North America (which led to an independent Canada).


China in the 1830s and 1840s had stagnated for almost a century, and was unable to effectively contest the British Royal Navy. The Royal Navy easily destroyed Chinese ships (often called “junks”). To call this a naval war would be a misnomer; it was a naval massacre. The British forces easily destroyed their competition, sailed or steamed up the Chinese rivers, and threatened the Chinese cities, forcing the Emperor to sue for peace. Other European nations did not complain about British war crimes during this time period since they also wanted trade with China, and wanted to keep good relations with the British government. The stories of sacked Chinese cities and wrecked palaces may have circulated, but they did not affect European policy. The “Middle Kingdom” era, where China saw itself as the strongest power, would be over. China would have to make unfavorable trade deals (which benefited European powers, chiefly Britain). Other countries like France, Russia, and even the United States of America swooped in to get their own pieces of the China trade. All involved benefited with the exception of China. The situation in China was so untenable that many reformers seriously thought about overthrowing the Emperor in China. The reformers sought European help for the attempted westernization of China. In particular, the United States of America and its system of government would become important. Some Chinese reformers attempted to imitate the Republic system formed in the United States; the United States, who wanted to spread its “American system” around the world, approved of them. The stage was set for the Pan-China War.
 
Last edited:
Chapter update: where to next? 1850s will be a "doldrum decade" in this timeline... primarily western expansion and that's it, unless you want something with that. I also have no idea what to do with Canada. 1860s is when things will start getting interesting again.
 
Chapter update: where to next? 1850s will be a "doldrum decade" in this timeline... primarily western expansion and that's it, unless you want something with that. I also have no idea what to do with Canada. 1860s is when things will start getting interesting again.
Africa? The states set up in West Africa for Freemen like Sierra Leone and Liberia
 
Africa? The states set up in West Africa for Freemen like Sierra Leone and Liberia
Hmm. Although I don't think this really took off to any big extent in America in this timeline. Now Sierra Leone probably does exist, and similar to OTL Sierra Leone, but I will probably do African Exploration/Scramble for Africa probably in 1880s-90s?
 
Far East Part 2
Other countries did not want the British Empire to have a free hand in Asia. French, Russian, and even American policymakers wanted their own trade in China. As a result, they attempted their own trade with China, and were stymied by the same ineffective Chinese bureaucracy that was not interested in trade. Merchants often found themselves frustrated with their own governments at a supposed inability to open links to China; everyone was angry at the Chinese for not opening trade. The British Empire had large stocks of opium, which was imported and smuggled into China in exchange for trade goods, especially tea, silk, spices, and porcelain. There was a problem, though. Opium was highly addictive; the Chinese government knew this and banned the substance. In addition, the Chinese government often cracked down on users and dealers of opium. The British demanded the Chinese compensate them for the lost money; the Chinese refused, prompting the British government to send in the Royal Navy in 1842, shortly after the conclusion of the failed adventure in North America (which led to an independent Canada).


China in the 1830s and 1840s had stagnated for almost a century, and was unable to effectively contest the British Royal Navy. The Royal Navy easily destroyed Chinese ships (often called “junks”). To call this a naval war would be a misnomer; it was a naval massacre. The British forces easily destroyed their competition, sailed or steamed up the Chinese rivers, and threatened the Chinese cities, forcing the Emperor to sue for peace. Other European nations did not complain about British war crimes during this time period since they also wanted trade with China, and wanted to keep good relations with the British government. The stories of sacked Chinese cities and wrecked palaces may have circulated, but they did not affect European policy. The “Middle Kingdom” era, where China saw itself as the strongest power, would be over. China would have to make unfavorable trade deals (which benefited European powers, chiefly Britain). Other countries like France, Russia, and even the United States of America swooped in to get their own pieces of the China trade. All involved benefited with the exception of China. The situation in China was so untenable that many reformers seriously thought about overthrowing the Emperor in China. The reformers sought European help for the attempted westernization of China. In particular, the United States of America and its system of government would become important. Some Chinese reformers attempted to imitate the Republic system formed in the United States; the United States, who wanted to spread its “American system” around the world, approved of them. The stage was set for the Pan-China War.
 
Late 1850s North America
The Westward Expansion of Canada was somewhat similar to the Westward Expansion of the United States of America. Settlers moved west due to large amounts of available land. A big difference, however, was the fur trade. The fur trade was very important for Canada—furs for clothes became a very important export. Various companies existed to exploit the Canadian west. Perhaps the most important fur product at this stage was beaver pelts for the construction of hats. The main demand for this was in Europe. Beaver hats were in large demand, and this caused the collapse of the beaver population in many areas due to the high levels of hunting. The bison also was a target for hunting, especially due to the demand for bison pelts in the United States of America (often used as a symbol of the West, or for leather). The meat was also used to feed railway workers in the West in both countries.


Settlement of the West proceeded rather slowly, the first stage being the mountaineers and trappers, who often made deals with Native Americans on where to find the best fur-producing areas. Other industries included the timber industry (which cut down trees that were abundant in the various boreal forests), the mining industry (first in the Canadian Rockies, then later in the Yukon), and agriculture in the Great Plains of Canada. Wheat cultivation in agriculture became important in the next wave of settlement. The Great Plains area had similar settlement patterns as the United States of America, but with more government oversight in the beginning stages. Native Americans were often expelled and forced to go ever further west as the Canadian settlers started consolidating newly-settled lands. The Mounties (a mounted police force that existed on the frontier) started accumulating legends in this period, driving out various outlaws that existed in the Canadian frontier. After the Canadian Revolution, the task at hand was to form a stable government. Constitution-building began, with heavy influences on the United States of America.


Meanwhile, in the United States of America, events were proceeding rather slowly. The late 1850s were spent primarily digesting the territories gained from Mexico in the Mexican-American War. Foreign policy was painfully average in that period--no disasters, but also no great achievements there. The progress of civil rights (faster than most Americas across the multiverse)—slowed down, and only picked up in the 1860s and onward. The United States seemed content with westward expansion and trade, with no big foes in the 1850s. Stabilization started to occur in the other countries in the Americas, with the development of the “Protector Doctrine” which stated the United States of America had a responsibility for protecting other countries in its hemisphere. Stabilization of other governments to prevent instability started to occur, with many South American countries like Gran Colombia (formed after its successful rebellion from Spain; Simon Bolivar was able to keep it together despite factionalism), Peru, and Chile. Mexico was reeling from the Mexican-American War, trying to find any semblance of stability--it would not arrive until the late 1860s.


The Presidents of the United States during the late 1850s (Franklin Pierce (D-R) from 1852 -56; John C. Fremont (W) from 1856-1860) accomplished little other than western expansion. Pierce in particular was considered "An incompetent" due to his apparent lack of care about American welfare--just enough not to cause massive problems, but hardly doing anything else. John C. Fremont won the Election of 1856 over Franklin Pierce, but soon faced his own problems--an economic depression called the Panic of 1857, and revanchists down south in "British Columbia". The revanchists down south in "British Columbia" turned out to be a bunch of hot air. They did not have the capability to spark a serious war across the North American continent, and Fremont The Panic of 1857 would be the last depression in the US where there would not be an organized government response. Fremont did attempt to make speeches stating that "America will endure", but most people had thought he was not particularly competent at solving an economic crisis. He did, however, have more success in the civil rights department.


Fremont enforced an anti-lynching law thoroughly (often times in the early 1850s in the Pierce (D-R) era, that law was badly enforced, leading to tragic deaths of many people, especially in the West and "Upper South", and of African Americans.) The "Knights of the Storm" (early hate group against immigrants and African Americans) were reduced in number, being arrested. While many still remained, the problem was now less than it originally was. However, even these two accomplishments could not prevent Fremont from winning his reelection; people did not have faith in his handling of the economic crisis. The stage was set for the formation of the formation of the "Progressive" party in 1858, and its standard-bearer in Abraham Lincoln.

Political Parties so far (I'll need to double check)
Federalist (collapsed); replaced by Whigs.
Democratic-Republican (splits into Democratic and Republican later...)
Progressive (forms 1858)
 
Last edited:
Top