Into the Cincoverse - The Cinco de Mayo EU Thread and Wikibox Repository

Where do you dig up these guys? Great entry! Loved the spoiler-y part too x'D x'D
Thanks! I forget where exactly I dug up Hamburg but I have a weird affinity for North California hippies (along with urban machine Dems, Yankee Brahmins, Prairie populists... my aesthetics are strange) and wanted to do something off the wall.

Haha... yeah. Wanted to make sure I got some of my future ideas down for everybody to enjoy since it'll be a WHILE before that ever pops up in the narrative, lol
 
Hmm. I think that California has been pretty consistent in having the 1st congressional district border Oregon, which seems less likely to have a Green Candidate.. May be gerrymandered along the coast all the way from the Oregon border down the coast to the Golden Gate Bridge as CA-2 is in OTL.
 
Hmm. I think that California has been pretty consistent in having the 1st congressional district border Oregon, which seems less likely to have a Green Candidate.. May be gerrymandered along the coast all the way from the Oregon border down the coast to the Golden Gate Bridge as CA-2 is in OTL.
The first touches Oregon at the coast above Eureka, though ITTL's 2020/2022 it doesn't reach nearly that far south
 
Daniel Akaka
Daniel Kahikina Akaka (September 11, 1924 - April 6, 2018) was a Hawaiian political figure who served 38 years as Prime Minister of the Kingdom of Hawaii, from 1976 until his resignation shortly after his 90th birthday in 2014. Akaka's forty-year period as the chief of Hawaii's government at the Chairman of the Democratic People's Party saw Hawaii's continued emergence as a center of communications, trade and finance at the heart of the Pacific Ocean. Akaka was a member of the Royal Guards who after the 1954 Hawaiian Revolution that overthrew the Anglo-Canadian economic oligarchy rapidly rose in the ranks of the now-ruling HDPP and was appointed minister of defence in Masayuki Matsunaga's cabinet in 1968 and his minister of finance in 1972; after Matsunaga's resignation in 1976 due to a corruption scandal, Akaka, a Native Hawaiian, outmaneuvered the favored Ken Inouye of the Japanese-Hawaiian faction within the party to take over the chairmanship and was appointed Prime Minister the next day by King Kawananakoa I.

Akaka's government saw the HDPP shift away from its left-populist and democratic socialist roots to a more developmentalist direction; having already accomplished land reform and other policies, the party focused instead on developing Honolulu as an entrepot and offshore financial center for the Asia-Pacific, deepening its ties to Japan and the United States as opposed to its longstanding reliance on the British Commonwealth for trade and economics, and maturing its growing tourism sector without threatening Hawaii's environmental reserves, which Akaka quadrupled in size in the name of conservation. Despite this shift to the center, Akaka continued to pursue a strictly protected agricultural policy, and government welfare benefits were expanded dramatically in the early 1990s. Politically, Akaka favored Natives over Asians, a controversial position in a party long reliant on the Japanese-descended working class for support; Hawaiian was added as an official language of the Kingdom alongside English, its teaching in secondary schools was mandatory for most of the 1980s and 1990s, and Native chiefs were appointed to his Cabinet. His relationship with his brother Abraham, an influential Presbyterian preacher, was also highly controversial. The Akaka family personally lived frugal lifestyles, but the HDPP held a firm supermajority grasp on power through a system of graft, machine politics and voter intimidation, and the government was largely regarded as a flawed or illiberal democracy by international observers despite ostensibly holding free elections every four and then five years. Among Natives, Akaka enjoyed a substantial personality cult; among haole non-Natives, his reputation was considerably more controversial.

Following the 2002 global financial crisis, which hit Asia disproportionately hard, the Hawaiian economy collapsed and unemployment rates went as high as 30%, and its expensive reliance on imports triggered riots over food prices and other consumer goods as well as severe brain drain. Hugely unpopular, Akaka's HDPP barely survived the fall 2009 elections despite the economy having begun to recover from the nadir of the depression and his government was largely run thereafter with him purely as a figurehead; at his televised 90th birthday celebration five years later, with the party heading towards a landslide defeat in the polls, Akaka announced his retirement from politics in favor of his longtime deputy John Waihe'e; less than a month later, the HDPP was defeated after sixty consecutive years in power. Untouched and not implicated by subsequent corruption investigations, Akaka retired to a small family compound near Honolulu, where he died in 2018.

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The first touches Oregon at the coast above Eureka, though ITTL's 2020/2022 it doesn't reach nearly that far south
The farther north the southern end of the district is, the less likely it is to elect a Green. However it may be that the first incarnation of it allowed for his election and then incumbency helps in regards to redistricting. (though the question is why would the state legislature be that nice. :) )
 
Dengist Hawaii - sweet
Yeah that’s a pretty decent comparison!

The farther north the southern end of the district is, the less likely it is to elect a Green. However it may be that the first incarnation of it allowed for his election and then incumbency helps in regards to redistricting. (though the question is why would the state legislature be that nice. :) )
Hah true though we’re getting way in the weeds on that (not that I haven’t drawn a few modern day CdM congressional maps in DRA…
 
Daniel Kahikina Akaka (September 11, 1924 - April 6, 2018) was a Hawaiian political figure who served 38 years as Prime Minister of the Kingdom of Hawaii, from 1976 until his resignation shortly after his 90th birthday in 2014. Akaka's forty-year period as the chief of Hawaii's government at the Chairman of the Democratic People's Party saw Hawaii's continued emergence as a center of communications, trade and finance at the heart of the Pacific Ocean. Akaka was a member of the Royal Guards who after the 1954 Hawaiian Revolution that overthrew the Anglo-Canadian economic oligarchy rapidly rose in the ranks of the now-ruling HDPP and was appointed minister of defence in Masayuki Matsunaga's cabinet in 1968 and his minister of finance in 1972; after Matsunaga's resignation in 1976 due to a corruption scandal, Akaka, a Native Hawaiian, outmaneuvered the favored Ken Inouye of the Japanese-Hawaiian faction within the party to take over the chairmanship and was appointed Prime Minister the next day by King Kawananakoa I.

Akaka's government saw the HDPP shift away from its left-populist and democratic socialist roots to a more developmentalist direction; having already accomplished land reform and other policies, the party focused instead on developing Honolulu as an entrepot and offshore financial center for the Asia-Pacific, deepening its ties to Japan and the United States as opposed to its longstanding reliance on the British Commonwealth for trade and economics, and maturing its growing tourism sector without threatening Hawaii's environmental reserves, which Akaka quadrupled in size in the name of conservation. Despite this shift to the center, Akaka continued to pursue a strictly protected agricultural policy, and government welfare benefits were expanded dramatically in the early 1990s. Politically, Akaka favored Natives over Asians, a controversial position in a party long reliant on the Japanese-descended working class for support; Hawaiian was added as an official language of the Kingdom alongside English, its teaching in secondary schools was mandatory for most of the 1980s and 1990s, and Native chiefs were appointed to his Cabinet. His relationship with his brother Abraham, an influential Presbyterian preacher, was also highly controversial. The Akaka family personally lived frugal lifestyles, but the HDPP held a firm supermajority grasp on power through a system of graft, machine politics and voter intimidation, and the government was largely regarded as a flawed or illiberal democracy by international observers despite ostensibly holding free elections every four and then five years. Among Natives, Akaka enjoyed a substantial personality cult; among haole non-Natives, his reputation was considerably more controversial.

Following the 2002 global financial crisis, which hit Asia disproportionately hard, the Hawaiian economy collapsed and unemployment rates went as high as 30%, and its expensive reliance on imports triggered riots over food prices and other consumer goods as well as severe brain drain. Hugely unpopular, Akaka's HDPP barely survived the fall 2009 elections despite the economy having begun to recover from the nadir of the depression and his government was largely run thereafter with him purely as a figurehead; at his televised 90th birthday celebration five years later, with the party heading towards a landslide defeat in the polls, Akaka announced his retirement from politics in favor of his longtime deputy John Waihe'e; less than a month later, the HDPP was defeated after sixty consecutive years in power. Untouched and not implicated by subsequent corruption investigations, Akaka retired to a small family compound near Honolulu, where he died in 2018.

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What an amazing coincidence! I was just looking into Asian-American congressmen this morning and so this was definitely a treat with everything fresh in my mind. Might I ask what ended up happening to Daniel Inouye after he lost the leadership contest?
 
What an amazing coincidence! I was just looking into Asian-American congressmen this morning and so this was definitely a treat with everything fresh in my mind. Might I ask what ended up happening to Daniel Inouye after he lost the leadership contest?
Glad you enjoyed! Inouye was much more of a titan than Akaka in HI politics so I thought having Akaka be the generic post-colonial leader who pulled a Mugabe (age-wise, at least) would be more fun.

I can do a whole writeup on Inouye if its requested, my thinking was he sticks around as a Cabinet member for several decades as Akaka's wingman for the Japanese-Hawaiian constituency.
 
QUSETA
The Quebec-United States Energy and Trade Agreement, often known by its acronym QUSETA, is an in-force bilateral trade agreement between the United States and Quebec, signed on March 11, 2007 at a ceremony at the Montreal City Hall, by United States President Roger Goodell and Quebec Prime Minister Gilles Duceppe. The agreement eliminated a number of tariffs and set all remaining tariffs with a ceiling of 10%, but most critically it guaranteed Quebecois electricity from hydroelectric and nuclear sources access to the American wholesale electricity market, thus creating the first open transborder electricity market in North America and grid synchronicity, a novel policy for a free trade agreement.

Quebec, since its independence from Canada in 1991, had suffered a severe and prolonged economic malaise, including capital flight, emigration and high unemployment for most of the 1990s, and a brief recovery in the early 2000s had been arrested by the 2002 Asian financial crisis and subsequent global credit markets collapse. However, one economic advantage enjoyed by Quebec was one of the cheapest electricity markets in the world, thanks to its heavily-financed and robust state-owned hydroelectric provider, Hydro-Quebec, which established starting in the late 1950s one of the largest hydroelectric systems in the world and on top of that constructed eight nuclear reactors with megawatt ratings in excess of the Westinghouse base, creating an electricity surplus that was exported to the rest of Canada and, starting in 1994, the state of New Hampshire. However, additional interconnections were blocked by economic issues in Quebec and incompatible regulations. Facing having to close several electricity stations due to a surplus, joining an energy market with the United States became a question of economic development in Quebec and was the key issue in the 2000 general elections. Duceppe, Prime Minister starting in 2001, negotiated the agreement starting in early 2005 after the election of Goodell and after winning a mandate to sign such an agreement in the 2006 elections - fought exclusively on the question - drafted and agreed to the policy in 2007.

The agreement has been controversial in Quebec. QUSETA made Quebec considerably more economically dependent upon the United States than it was pre-2007, and its removal of a number of market protections for certain Quebecois industries was said to exacerbate elevated unemployment in the late 2000s and early 2010s; most controversially, the government of Quebec agreed to subject Hydro-Quebec's pricing to floating rates rather than price-setting, and allow international investment in the firm while retaining a majority stake and golden share. Cree Natives have complained that it financed even more habitat destruction as three new high-voltage connection lines were run into the Northeastern United States, and electricity prices in Quebec, while remaining extremely low by global standards, have risen higher than the typically low rate of inflation since the agreement. South of the border, however, the act has been thought to have accelerated the ongoing American energy transition and helped cement New England's position as a major information technology hub with its access to cheap hydro, nuclear and wind power on both sides of the border, and analysts have argued that the increase in trade, particularly in wholesale electricity that rationalized Quebec's production and transmission glut and ended Hydro-Quebec's practice of temporarily shuttering facilities for over-production, has increased the GDP per capita of the transborder region substantially since 2007. Quebecois proponents of the act further suggest that accessing wider markets for Hydro-Quebec helped avoid its potential privatization, as was seen as a likely case for the government in the mid-2000s.

1666218941071.png
 
So apparently Quebec is not so much Northern Ireland as much as it is Ireland on the whole.
Correct
Wow, it took until 1991 for the low-hanging fruit of Quebec to secede from Orange Canada? Surprising!
All posts in the Cincoverse EU are subject to retcon at a moment's notice lol. If that's unrealistic, I'm always happy to change it, though my long-term thinking on Canada looks more like Dutch pillarization for a short (and tense) while
 
Correct

All posts in the Cincoverse EU are subject to retcon at a moment's notice lol. If that's unrealistic, I'm always happy to change it, though my long-term thinking on Canada looks more like Dutch pillarization for a short (and tense) while
Oh, no worries, I was just surprised that Canada held together that long (with the assumption that even ITTL that Quebec would be first to want to head for the exits).
 
2021 Rugby World Cup
The 2021 Rugby World Cup was the 19th and most recent edition of the Rugby World Cup, hosted primarily in Ireland with some venues in Scotland, making it the second joint bid after the 2009 edition in England/Wales. Ireland had previously hosted the World Cup in 1981, and it was the first World Cup in which every previous champion and runner-up qualified for the tournament, and Australia entered as a two-time defending champion.

The pool stages proved a major shock, as the only three countries to win a World Cup dating back to 1987 - Australia, the United States, and the Confederate States - were all eliminated prior to the quarterfinals, creating the most open knockout round in recent history, especially after traditional rugby powers South Africa and Argentina failed to advance to the semis. Of the semifinalists, only Texas (as 2017 edition's runner-up) had appeared in a semifinal in the previous three editions; England advanced for the first time since 2005, France appeared in a final four for the first time since 1981, and Ireland advanced to the semis for the first time in their history. With the advance of England and Ireland to the final, it guaranteed the appearance of a European squad in a final for the first time since 1993 when Italy was defeated by the United States and the first European champion since 1981, when England had emerged victorious. Ireland defeated England 38-12 to win their first World Cup title in history at Stadium Ireland.

Besides its rampant upsets, the 2021 edition was known for its high scoring, particularly by the Texas team that placed fourth, frequent penalties, and surprise advances to the quarterfinals by Hawaii and Samoa, both of whom were making their knockout round debuts.

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I do not expect an answer but I'm assuming that England/Scotland/Wales being separate teams is similar to OTL World Cup where the constituent countries of the UK all play separately as opposed to the UK has completely shattered and England/Wales/Scotland are all independent entities.
 
The 2021 Rugby World Cup was the 19th and most recent edition of the Rugby World Cup, hosted primarily in Ireland with some venues in Scotland, making it the second joint bid after the 2009 edition in England/Wales. Ireland had previously hosted the World Cup in 1981, and it was the first World Cup in which every previous champion and runner-up qualified for the tournament, and Australia entered as a two-time defending champion.

The pool stages proved a major shock, as the only three countries to win a World Cup dating back to 1987 - Australia, the United States, and the Confederate States - were all eliminated prior to the quarterfinals, creating the most open knockout round in recent history, especially after traditional rugby powers South Africa and Argentina failed to advance to the semis. Of the semifinalists, only Texas (as 2017 edition's runner-up) had appeared in a semifinal in the previous three editions; England advanced for the first time since 2005, France appeared in a final four for the first time since 1981, and Ireland advanced to the semis for the first time in their history. With the advance of England and Ireland to the final, it guaranteed the appearance of a European squad in a final for the first time since 1993 when Italy was defeated by the United States and the first European champion since 1981, when England had emerged victorious. Ireland defeated England 38-12 to win their first World Cup title in history at Stadium Ireland.

Besides its rampant upsets, the 2021 edition was known for its high scoring, particularly by the Texas team that placed fourth, frequent penalties, and surprise advances to the quarterfinals by Hawaii and Samoa, both of whom were making their knockout round debuts.

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So atleast Texas is going to be independent after GAW.
 
Go Ireland! Dev always said that Rugby was the game which best fit the Irish spirit; though it was often downplayed in the early 20th century as an English game. Still, I still remember getting into Rugby when I did my semester abroad there during the Six Nations; so I'm happy to see them hosting and winning in this ATL. I do note that Ireland has two different flags in that info box - this is actually a pretty big deal, because the tricolor would indicate that Ireland broke away from Britain violently. There is no way that a Dominion-esque Kingdom of Ireland would fly the tricolor which was tied intrinsically with Republicanism.

Also; Texas playing dirty and focusing on high scoring and breaking every rule they can imagine? It seems Texans in the ATL play like Texas teams in OTL ;)
 
I do not expect an answer but I'm assuming that England/Scotland/Wales being separate teams is similar to OTL World Cup where the constituent countries of the UK all play separately as opposed to the UK has completely shattered and England/Wales/Scotland are all independent entities.
You are correct! I’m unsure/undecided if multiple FAs a la OTL is what we’ll see in association football, though. But rugby being such a commonwealth sport gets the Home Nations their own sides, yes
Go Ireland! Dev always said that Rugby was the game which best fit the Irish spirit; though it was often downplayed in the early 20th century as an English game. Still, I still remember getting into Rugby when I did my semester abroad there during the Six Nations; so I'm happy to see them hosting and winning in this ATL. I do note that Ireland has two different flags in that info box - this is actually a pretty big deal, because the tricolor would indicate that Ireland broke away from Britain violently. There is no way that a Dominion-esque Kingdom of Ireland would fly the tricolor which was tied intrinsically with Republicanism.

Also; Texas playing dirty and focusing on high scoring and breaking every rule they can imagine? It seems Texans in the ATL play like Texas teams in OTL ;)
that’s a quirk of Wikipedia, incidentally; if anyone knows how to correct for that I’m all ears, because it auto-placed the flags in there without links
 
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