Into the Cincoverse - The Cinco de Mayo EU Thread and Wikibox Repository

Hello all! As some of you may know, my main timeline on this site is the rather long, sprawling Cinco de Mayo that has quite a bit of small cultural tidbits and odds and ends thrown in, but I wanted to try my hand at a wikibox thread in the vein of @Rattigan's outstanding ASSM expanded universe that steps outside the confines of the TL a bit and serves as a more broad exploration of the "Cincoverse" that serves as the backbone of the main thread. Posts here will be fairly infrequent and will largely be me following my muse (so some wikiboxes will be flashforward semi-spoilers for the main threat, though I'll try to keep that to a minimum...) but we'll see what comes of it!
 
Of course, first thing's first...

Puebla Wikibox.jpg
 
Nice - looks like fun. My usual question in all of these is about largest sports leagues but I'll wait for CdM to get a few decades into the future before I do that
 
Nice - looks like fun. My usual question in all of these is about largest sports leagues but I'll wait for CdM to get a few decades into the future before I do that
Yeah! There’ll definitely be some sports content integrated here. Maybe just one off events like Olympics and the like at first before things get more sophisticated. One of my goals with this EU is to tell “smaller stories,” too, that don’t really warrant a mainline update
 
Sewanee University
Sewanee University, officially the Sewanee University of the South, is a private research liberal arts university in Sewanee, Tennessee that is regarded as one of the most prestigious private universities in the Confederate States. Founded in 1857 by the Polk family and other Tennessee notables and affiliated to this day with the Episcopal Church in the Confederate States (ECCS), after independence it emerged as an elite institution first for the sons of Tennessean planters and businessmen and, by the start of the 20th century, the entire Confederacy, as was the original vision of its founder and longtime President Leonidas Polk who pledged it would be "the Cambridge of Dixie."

The university was badly affected during the Great American War, losing most of its enrollment (the entire undergraduate class of 1914 would perish in combat) and would not reopen until 1923, after the end of the United States' postwar occupation, with substantial damage done to its old Gothic-style campus, and it was not included in the subsidized reconstruction plans offered during the first Long administration as it was a private institution. Thanks to the tireless efforts by a small cadre of alumni, the campus and academic programs were restored and by the early 1950s, it had recovered its status as the leading member of the Roundtable of private Confederate universities, famed for its rigorous liberal arts curriculum (particularly in history), and for graduates of its postgraduate law school. Sewanee, despite its reputation as a bastion of the Confederacy's conservative aristocracy and orthodox Episcopalian campus life, was the first member of the Roundtable Schools to admit female (1971) and Black (2004) undergraduates. Alumni include six justices of the Confederate Supreme Court, four Confederate Senators for Tennessee, a Speaker of the CS House of Representatives, five Governors of Tennessee, over a hundred Tennessee state legislators and over 120 Tillman Scholars.

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(Hat tip to @SWS for this idea)
(D’oh it says “US” not CS 🤦‍♂️)
 
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first Long administration

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(Hat tip to @SWS for this idea)
(D’oh it says “US” not CS 🤦‍♂️)
Huh, looks like A - Huey Long gets the big chair (or someone else named "Long" does) and B - Confederate presidents can serve more than one term in the future.

Also, that undergrad/postgrad ratio is backwards. Can't think of a university that offers undergrad education that has that many postgrads to that few undergrads.

Hyped for this thread though!
 
Huh, looks like A - Huey Long gets the big chair (or someone else named "Long" does) and B - Confederate presidents can serve more than one term in the future.

Also, that undergrad/postgrad ratio is backwards. Can't think of a university that offers undergrad education that has that many postgrads to that few undergrads.

Hyped for this thread though!
No comment on A/B, Easter eggs are meant to be Easter eggs 🙃

But that ratio is based on Harvard, which of course is a bit unusual in terms of the UG/PG ratio. Big private research unis could give two shits about undergrad and Sewanee really exists for its professional schools
 
No comment on A/B, Easter eggs are meant to be Easter eggs 🙃

But that ratio is based on Harvard, which of course is a bit unusual in terms of the UG/PG ratio. Big private research unis could give two shits about undergrad and Sewanee really exists for its professional schools
It's definitely in contrast with the OTL Sewanee, which has less than 100 graduate students!
 
No comment on A/B, Easter eggs are meant to be Easter eggs 🙃

But that ratio is based on Harvard, which of course is a bit unusual in terms of the UG/PG ratio. Big private research unis could give two shits about undergrad and Sewanee really exists for its professional schools
Shouldn't it have produced some more alumni? (One president at least:)
 
Zebulon Baird Vance (May 13, 1830 - April 14, 1894) was a politician of the early Confederate States most famous for his long tenures as Governor of North Carolina and later the state's Senator for nearly two decades. Elected late during the War of Secession as the "soldier's candidate," Vance as Governor made a name for himself as an opponent first of Jefferson Davis and later Nathan B. Forrest; after the Raleigh Massacre against protesting veterans, he founded a political movement based in firm state's rights conservatism and state development with its own paramilitary known as the Red Scarves who backed him in Presidential runs in both 1867 and 1873, where he carried his home state in each. However, he failed to defeat Forrest and his Red Scarves were often violently attacked and purged in other states by Forrest's Kuklos Klan organization, and his run against President John Breckinridge and his opponent Secretary of State Isham Harris six years later was largely treated as an afterthought confined to the Carolinas.

Having failed to reach the Presidency, Vance nonetheless built a potent electoral machine in his home state of North Carolina and was massively popular with the public there for helping the state work through the volatile postwar era via expanding railroads, founding schools and pursuing other forms of economic development in an early, proto-progressive fashion. He was elected to the Confederate Senate in the summer of 1875 after the death of his friend and ally William Graham and would serve for nearly twenty years until his own death in 1894. In the Senate he was an on-again, off-again ally to the Longstreet Machine, which he tacitly linked his own political network into and supported in its project of Reconciliation with the United States, but never quite forgave Longstreet for commanding the forces that attacked Raleigh in 1866. In North Carolina he is still to this day highly regarded as one of the state's finer statesmen.

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Long Thanh International Airport
Long Thanh International Airport (IATA: LTH), commonly known as Saigon-Long Thanh, is a major international airport in Long Thanh, Dong Nai Province, Vietnam. Approximately 40 kilometres from Saigon, it opened after considerable delays in 2016 to replace the overcrowded Tan Son Nhat (IATA: SGN) as the main airport for Vietnam's largest city and main financial, business and cultural center. It serves as the flagship global hub of Vietnam Airlines, the flag carrier of Vietnam.

The rapid growth of Saigon during the late 20th century and Tan Son Nhat's dramatic overcapacity (it was designed for at most 25 million, a number it exceeded in 2001) and physical constraints near the city center led to the approval of the new international airport of Saigon in the rural community of Long Thanh by the National Assembly of Vietnam in 2004. Construction started in late 2009 with an initial target completion of March 2014; the Asian Spring protests of 2012 interrupted its timetable and it was delayed until May of 2016. It opened with one terminal and two runways; the second passenger terminal, as well as a high-speed rail connection to the airport, was opened together in December 2019. With the opening of Terminal 1, Tan Son Nhat was reserved only for low-cost carriers or airlines not in Vietnam Airlines' SkyFleet airline alliance, with all affiliated airlines making the switch between airports entirely in one day. Beginning in January of 2021, Tan Son Nhat is exclusively to serve as a low-cost carrier hub. When Long Thanh Airport is fully built out, it will have four passenger terminals, four runways and a capacity of approximately 100 million passengers per annum.

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A thought from the Sewanee infobox. Do any of the Greek Letter Organizations (including Phi Beta Kappa) have active chapters on both sides of the USA/CSA border?
 
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