Indo european group migrates to Australia and Indonesia

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: Before 1900' started by Astrapothereum, Mar 14, 2019.

  1. Astrapothereum Well-Known Member

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    There were many Indo-Aryan seafaring tribes in Sri Lanka. Maybe one of them could go one step further and be able to sail and reach the coasts of Sumatra and eventually reach Northren Australia? Discuss about the butterflies and what might happen to such a tribe if they reach the Malay archipelago, Australia, New Guinea, and maybe New Zealand. I know this is probably ASB but still fun to think about realistically.
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2019
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  2. Hvalrossen Well-Known Member

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    12% of the Balinese Y-Chromosome is apparantly of 'Indian' origin. Depending on the time period this entered the Balinese gene pool, this may have happened after the Indo-Aryan migration into India. It appears that some Indo-Aryans did migrate to Indonesia, but their descendants have adopted the local languages.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balinese_people
     
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  3. metalinvader665 Well-Known Member

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    In Indonesia, they'd likely be absorbed by the locals or later Austronesians. In Australia, they wouldn't prosper simply because of harsh conditions. Not much reason to go all that way to farm a desert. However, I think the best approach would be a sort of "thalassocracy" in one of those areas, although it would be Indo-European speaking peoples building on what others before them had made (like was the case in the Maldives where the locals ended up speaking Indo-European languages).

    I like the idea of a medieval Maldivian thalassocracy spreading out over the Indian Ocean, settling marginal islands like the Chagos Archipelago, the Mascarene Islands, and Cocos Island/Christmas Island as part of how they trade with Madagascar, Africa, and Indonesia. Perhaps a state like this could find some value in Australia, and have small colonies there, spreading their religion (Islam, maybe Buddhism or Christianity depending on how the previous few centuries went) and trading for sandalwood, gold, or diamonds.
     
  4. Vuu Resident Serb expert Banned

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    One very vital and useful thing they would bring with them is the knowledge of riding animals. Especially useful in New Guinea (goodbye, 800 irrelevant terrain-induced languages!)
     
  5. metalinvader665 Well-Known Member

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    What animal is this, and how can it surpass the jungles and swamps and the high mountains?
     
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  6. Jared LoRaG is now published

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    The common name is "helicopter kangaroo."
     
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  7. Flashman A Real Go-Getter

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    Isn't there some evidence to suggest Indian introgression into the Aboriginsl gene pool?
     
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  8. WilliamOfOckham Frog Emoji

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    That's not going to happen. Hell, even with jeeps central New Guinea is just barely less remote than it was 4000 years ago.
     
  9. Astrapothereum Well-Known Member

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    Those were Dravidian, not Indo-Aryan.
     
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  10. Zorqal Well-Known Member

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    If they could reach parts of Australia they could possibly do well, if they bring their knowledge of farming and horseback riding (alongside the required domesticates). Eastern Australia seems like a reach, but possibly reaching the areas around Perth could do well for them. Its relatively hospitable and arable, and they could farm and set up agrarian societies there. Its doubtful that they spread to the interior, even with horses though, due to how inhospitable it is. After some time and diffusion however, the Aboriginals could very easily adopt their farming techniques as well as possibly their animals, allowing for more permanent societies set up across Australia, especially the coastal regions. It seems likely the Indo-European group however would be locked in their corner as an isolated culture group, which would allow for some interesting cultural developments. The basis of their culture and religion would be Indian, but time and separation would make them completely unique.
     
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  11. Astrapothereum Well-Known Member

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    I also like the idea of an Indo-Aryan Southeast Asia.
     
  12. Madhav Deval Sri Sultan Nur Adyan Devanampriya

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    Culturally, it already was during the first millennium and that influence travelled from sapta sindhi régions at a pretty regular pace eastwards and southwards. Perhaps preventing the second Indian urbanisation and keeping the mobility of the Vedic era would allow for a wider distribution of ethnic Aryans, although it’d be a shame considering that butterflies Buddhism and the upanishads
     
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