Images from the Footprint of Mussolini

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Goge Vandire, Hih Theocrat of the Holy Terran Empire, the Imperium of Man’s darker mirror. Unlike Benito, Goge is a ruthless, religiousl-devoted tyrant who preaches that Humanity is superior, and that any deviation from it is heresy, punishable by extermination. Games Workshop is on the record as stating that Goge draws a lot of inspiration from both the Spanish Inquisition and the Grand Mufti.
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An Astartes belonging to the Black Templars. While most Space Marines, being transhumans themselves, find the ide of Human purity laughable and thus align themselves with the Imperium, the Templars do not, and their fanaticism and devotion to Human supremacy has led them and the Dark Angels to throw their lot in with the Holy Terran Empire.
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Astartes belonging to the Vlka Fenryka, or Space Wolves, Chapter of Space Marines. The Space Wolves are unique in that they are Beastmen who’s genes have been spliced with that of Wolves, yet they are able to recieve the genetic alterations nessecary to become transhuman Astartes. Hailing from the icy planet Fenris, the Space Wolves excel in close combat operations, and are loyal to the Imperium of Man and Humanity as a whole.
 
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A postcard from the British town of Varosha, Cyprus. Varosha is one of the most popular holiday resorts in the eastern Mediterranean, being famous for its beaches, its nightclubs and the many celebrities who hang out here every summer. It is also famous for the incidents each summer at the hands of some Turkish tourists who drink too much and have "extravagant" behaviors in the city.
 
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Äänislinna (former Petroskoi) in Eastern Finland. Petroskoi was capital of Karelian SSR. It status was quiet unclear after WW2. Stalin had originally planned to give Karelia to Finnish SSR but he was at end of the war bit unsure about that and never did with that during his lifetime. Khruschev solved the issue in 1954 when he achieved some administration changes which included giving Karelia to Finland and Crimea to Ukraine. Soon after Finland re-gained independence its government changed the name as Äänislinna what it used in 1940's when Finland occupied Karelia. This caused much of opposition on local Russians and as compromise it was decided that Finnish speakers can call that as Äänislinna and Russians as Petroskoi.

Nowadays Äänislinna is important center of East Karelia. The city has population of 198 700 (2020). It is has too largest Russian speakers population in Finland (67 %) and is one of few Finnish cities where majority of population are Russian speakers.

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Russian food store in Helsinki, Finland. In FInland and Baltic republics these are quiet common thing thanks of massive Russian minorities.

In Finland Russians form 23 % of the population. After dissolution of USSR Finnish government didn't admit citizenshiåp to Russians. Same thing did governments of Baltic nations too. So them had ask citizenship themselves. There has been quiet much of discrimination towards Russians post Cold War years. It was usual that Finnish nationalists broke windows of Russian stores and even vandalised Russian cars. Many Finns too refused buy anything what was Russian origin.

These stances anyway changed during 1990's. Nowadays Finns have accepted Russians as part of their society altough quiet relucantely. Russsian language has too minority status so they can get services in Russian language. Most of Finnish Russians are descended from them who have moved during Soviet occupation but there is too much of them who have moved to Finland after Cold War.
 
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A group of marchers belonging to the “New Roman Party” in 2010.​

Starting as a splinter group from the Partito Nazionale Fascista by disaffected fascists after the fall of the One Party State in 1979, the Nuovo Partito Romano (New Roman Party, NPR) has steadily grown in popularity with many Italian youths in Italy proper — the Italian peninsula, Sicily, Sardinia, and Italy’s Balkan territories — who have grown disillusioned with the democracy that Italy has become (whether the ruling party be the Social Democrats, Conservatives, or Fascists) as the party argues for a return to the One Party State and making “Italy Great Again!” even though it is regarded by many both inside and outside of Italy as a great power already. The party is also extremely anti-monarchy and anti-clerical.

The party has also garnered a reputation of being incredibly aggressive with their “Nuovi Legionari/New Legionnaires” paramilitary often clashing with the PNF’s own Brigata Nazionale paramilitary, this is also because the NPR supports and follows the so-called “national syndicalist Annunzioist-line of Fascism” rather than the “corporatist Mussolinian-line of Fascism” and sees the man that inspired Benito Mussolini, Gabriele D'Annunzio, as the “True Father of Fascism”.

They have been slowly gaining influence in Italy’s East African colonies in former northern Ethiopia with them being incredibly racist – they are also known as a cult as they pray to, and worship, the pagan Roman Pantheon of Antiquity (animal sacrifices and all). They have also come under intense fire for their party’s red, black, and white turtle flag that invokes imagery and memories of nazism – which the party changed to a standard Italian flag with the royal crest replaced with their monochromatic turtle and the words “Let Jupiter Reign Once More” in Italian.
 
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The famous ending still of the movie Scambio alla Stazione di Benghasi, a romance movie about an Italo-jewish man called Giuseppe Brescia, who, after being forced to flee from Tobruk during the Second Arab War, finds himself falling in love with a woman, Ursula Fappani, who has found herself trapped in the chaos while trying to find a way back to Mainland Italy. While the movie's plot has been duly noted to be a rather predictable story of "meet cute-continued relationship- crisis- final union", the cinematography and shooting techniques are all everything but ordinary, with overly-filtered shots of then-current Benghazi's skyline (the movie was shot in 1971) used to intersped each act, composed by scenes which oftentimes show the protagonists in ordinary situations that, due to how the camera was placed and the lightning applied, makes them look dream-like and out of time, and the dialogue is often in "Libico" patois (from Giuseppe) or in a thick Massa-Carraran accent (for Ursula).

The movie originally didn't subtitle any of the dialogues, but after pressure from the ENIC, the director Aldo Sabino begrudgingly added them. The movie was initially a flop and ruined Valeria Oldoni's (Ursula's actress) acting career while Giuseppe's actor Francesco Logreco went back to his experimental electronic music band, but with the end of Fascism and an increased interest in the "forgotten" languages and dialects of Italy, it has seen a resurgence of interest, which also lead many to start praise the qualities of the shooting in itself and the tecniques employed. The advent of the Italian internet has also helped, for it made for a good source of jokes.
 
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Centurion Tank of the Royal Tank Regiment, fighting in China during the Chinese War. Developed initially as an answer to the German Tiger tank, the Centurions would not see action in WWII. They would, however, see major action in China, and would end up with an extremely high kill ratio against older Communist vehicles. Centurions would continue to serve in Commonwealth and allied militaries - with regular upgrades - up until the 1990s.

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Reichswehr honour guard at the funeral of Manfred Rommel - son of the famous Field Marshal, former Mayor of Stuttgart and Chancellor of the Federal Kingdom of Germany between 1980 and 1988 - in 2015. The funeral, paying homage as it did to a strong leader and the son of one of Germany's greatest heroes, saw not only the presence of the honour guard, but also the attendance of Kaiser Ferdinand VI and the serving Chancellor.

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Lebanese singer Leila, photographed at a concert in New York in 2004. Leila - full name Leila Saadeh - was born and grew up in Lebanon with a Lebanese father and a mother from Colombia. One of the few Lebanese artists to gain real fame outside Lebanon, her novel combination of modern pop lyrics and Lebanese traditional styles of music - together with her natural ability at belly-dancing - have led to her becoming extremely popular with international audiences and Lebanese youth. However, she is not popular with older Lebanese or with the Lebanese government, who - being of a more conservative Christian mindset - feel it to be inappropriate for Lebanon to be associated with such a 'provocative' individual. Her career underwent a hiatus between 2006 and 2008, when she was arrested and imprisoned under the nation's morality laws. On her release, however, she would move to Los Angeles, where she would resume her musical career, and has become highly outspoken regarding politics and 'backwardness' in her home nation.​
 
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CF-105 Avro Arrow. Developed during the late 1950s, the Arrow would serve as the primary fighter/interceptor of the Royal Canadian Air Force from 1960 until 1998, and for much of that time would also be bought and used by the Royal Australian Air Force and the Royal Air Force itself. Regarded as a pinnacle of engineering, and one of the fastest fighters of its day, the Arrow also is credited with having saved and extended the Canadian and British aeronautical industries.

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Fiat 'Stallone' fighter-bomber - the aircraft pictured here belongs to the Republic of China Navy, operating off the light carrier Zheng He (China's fleet of Stallones continued operating until the mid-1980s, following a major refit programme in 1975 to extend the life of the aircraft by equipping modern radar, avionics and modifications to allow for the mounting of modern missiles. Introduced in 1956, the Stallone represented Italy's first major carrier-capable jet, and would become the mainstay of both the Regia Marina and the Armada Española. In addition, when in 1961 South China acquired the former British carrier Leviathan, the government would purchase a dozen Stallones to serve as her air wing, while both the ROCAF and the Israeli Air Force would also invest in the fighter.

Italian and Spanish Stallones would serve during the Second Arab War, where their utility in low-level attack runs proved of exceptional help in providing close air support to Israeli and Italian troops - though they weren't as capable in that role as the Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm's Blackburn Buccaneers. Nearly two decades later, while the ROC Air Force was making use of more modern planes, the ROC Navy's Stallones - retired in favour of supersonic carrier aircraft by Italy and Spain - would serve during the liberation of Manchuria, providing support to advancing forces in coastal regions.

Though none of the CIS members currently use Stallones, a number of working examples are regularly seen at airshows.

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A convent in the Holy Lusitanian Kingdom. While such institutions are usually looked upon favourably elsewhere in the world, the convents of the HLK have a bad reputation. According to people who've left the HLK for Katanga, Europe or America, female religious orders take an active role in 'purifying' the Kingdom's female population. Women who're arrested or discovered by their families for having abortions, taking part in premarital sex, or being lesbian/bisexual, or whose families (or local clergy) think they're too outspoken, too feminist or too flirtatious, are frequently imprisoned in convents under the authority of the Kingdom's various religious orders, there to stay either until they've 'repented sufficiently' or indefinitely. Reports that have made it out of the Kingdom describe not only systematic ill-treatment - beatings and the like, as well as so-called 'aversion therapy' - but that the inmates are also used for free labour, in particular in the manufacture of cheap handcrafts for export or for tourists, and for laundry services offered by the Church at favourable rates to government and military personnel. The HLK's secular and religious authorities deny that convents are used for such purposes, as well as claiming that 'sinful women do not exist in the Holy Lusitanian Kingdom'.​
 
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Map of Internet Access Rights worldwide.

While in the beginning Internet's technology was developed almost-indipendently in all major powers between the Seventies and the Eighties, it's only towards the Dawn of the New Millennium that the idea of making the technology accessible to the civilian population came to mind. The earliest adopter of a "Civilian Internet" (actually a national intranet) was the Imperial Federation, followed by the United States and France. The first intranet to come into being in the CIS was the Italian one in 1996, followed the next year by China's. By 2007 a treaty was signed between ITO members to connect and make each civilian national intranet freely accessible to other member countries plus "allies". LAter on many other countries outside the ITO (the first of which was Serbia) joined this agreement, until, by 2020, many countries in the world have at least theoretical access to the Global Internet... that being said, not every single country has given full free reign to their citizens to see everything avaible, whether due to concerns of loss of culture (like Ireland, Nepal and Thailand), the fear of losing their grip on citizens (like Croatia, Italy and China), plain conservatorism (like Liberia, Jamaica and the HKL), or a mix of all three (like Korea).

Unlike Ethiopia, who hasn't expressed any interest in it accusing the idea of being a pointless frivolity, or Bhutan, whose king has declared the Internet to be unfit for his nation's spiritual and cultural development, South Africa so far has tried three times to get access, but has always been formally rejected, though clandestine Wi-Fi rerouters on the border between Botswana and South Africa aren't an uncommon sight.
 
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Map of Internet Access Rights worldwide.

While in the beginning Internet's technology was developed almost-indipendently in all major powers between the Seventies and the Eighties, it's only towards the Dawn of the New Millennium that the idea of making the technology accessible to the civilian population came to mind. The earliest adopter of a "Civilian Internet" (actually a national intranet) was the Imperial Federation, followed by the United States and France. The first intranet to come into being in the CIS was the Italian one in 1996, followed the next year by China's. By 2007 a treaty was signed between ITO members to connect and make each civilian national intranet freely accessible to other member countries plus "allies". LAter on many other countries outside the ITO (the first of which was Serbia) joined this agreement, until, by 2020, many countries in the world have at least theoretical access to the Global Internet... that being said, not every single country has given full free reign to their citizens to see everything avaible, whether due to concerns of loss of culture (like Ireland, Nepal and Thailand), the fear of losing their grip on citizens (like Croatia, Italy and China), plain conservatorism (like Liberia, Jamaica and the HKL), or a mix of all three (like Korea).

Unlike Ethiopia, who hasn't expressed any interest in it accusing the idea of being a pointless frivolity, or Bhutan, whose king has declared the Internet to be unfit for his nation's spiritual and cultural development, South Africa so far has tried three times to get access, but has always been formally rejected, though clandestine Wi-Fi rerouters on the border between Botswana and South Africa aren't an uncommon sight.

Looks good but some comments:

- East Africa probably ratherly has limiter if not total free Internet access.
- Syria probably has at least some level of Intranet.
- I would imaginate UAF and Iraq having very strickt limitations.
- Kurdistan has surely access to international Internet even if stricktly restricted.
- I bit suspect that Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan and Tajikistan have full Internet access freedoms. Probaly ratherly nominal limitations.
- Afghanistan might use stome strict Internet access limits.
- Sikkim I would imaginate using Intranet.
 
Looks good but some comments:

- East Africa probably ratherly has limiter if not total free Internet access.
- Syria probably has at least some level of Intranet.
- I would imaginate UAF and Iraq having very strickt limitations.
- Kurdistan has surely access to international Internet even if stricktly restricted.
- I bit suspect that Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan and Tajikistan have full Internet access freedoms. Probaly ratherly nominal limitations.
- Afghanistan might use stome strict Internet access limits.
- Sikkim I would imaginate using Intranet.
0) You're right indeed.
1) I mean, probably yes, I may have overshot the level of screwedness of Syria.
2) Noted
3) I think I mixed up Kurdistan and Assyria, and trusted my geo-guessing skills on Mosul's position. Guess I was wrong, my bad.
4) Perhaps, my logic was that their leaders would be the sort to say "we don't understand it, but from what little we understand, it's no good in the countryside, meh, let it be" and thus not implement national filters for sites, direct approval processes for sites of either foreign or domestic origin, or "Internet Licenses" (which was what I had in mind when categorizing Internet rights).
5) Eh, could go both ways IMO. On the one hand, it's a powerful tool for galvanazing dissenters. On the other hand, chances there isn't a particularily developed network
6) I think the resolution de-escalation ate up Sikkim's borders on my map and made it look merged with Bhutan or India.
 
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Flak-damaged de Havilland Sea Venom of 893 Naval Air Squadron, Fleet Air Arm, returning to the carrier HMS Eagle during the Chinese War. During the conflict, the allied navies were responsible for providing air and big gun support to allied ground forces in coastal areas - which, given the area of land controlled by the ROC during the initial stages of the conflict, meant that carrier air planes were particularly active during the initial stages of the conflict, and would remain so as they shadowed and supported the advance in the coastal provinces. The Sea Venoms, still relatively new, would perform well in both the fighter and ground-attack roles during the conflict, and would also provide useful information to the FAA and the British aerospace industry regarding future developments of carrier jets. Moreover, the conflict would reinforce the need for Britain to maintain a strong carrier-focused fleet.

The Sea Venom would be retired in 1956, making way for the Sea Vixen in the combat air patrol role and the Supermarine Scimitar in the strike role. The Scimitar would see major action in the Second Arabian War, though certain deficiencies would see it replaced in the strike role by the famous Blackburn Buccaneer.

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British commando carrier HMS Bulwark during the Second Arabian War. Originally commissioned as a light aircraft carrier, experiences of the Chinese War led Britain to focus on her larger carriers for fixed-wing operations and convert Bulwark and Albion for use as commando carriers. 'The Rusty B' would prove highly effective in this role. As part of the actions taking place around Operation Augustus, she would land elements of the Royal Marines' Four-Two Commando and 2nd Battalion, 2nd King Edward's Own Gurkhas at Port Said ahead of the main invasion force, aiding considerably in 'softening up' the city's defences ahead of the main landings. Though Bulwark would take damage from UAR jets a week later (before the jets were driven off by Sea Vixens operating from HMS Ark Royal), she would be back in action within a fortnight and would see the war through to the end.

While Bulwark was decommissioned in 1981, two of the helicopters used in the Port Said operations may be found at the Fleet Air Arm museum in Yeovil.


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Royal Navy F-19 Avro 'Raptor' multirole fighter, pictured at an airshow in Texas. The Raptor was developed jointly between the Imperial Federation and the United States as a carrier-capable multirole plane, and is manufactured in America, Britain and Australia. With regard to the Imperial Federation, the Raptor serves as the Fleet Air Arm's main fixed-wing aircraft, and forms the air wing of the Royal Navy's carriers Ark Royal, Eagle and Illustrious, as well as being operated by the Royal Australian Navy's Fleet Air Arm, the Royal Air Force, the Royal Canadian Air Force and the Royal Australian Air Force.



A/N: The Hornet with the RN skin was found on Google, seems to be from someone called Andy Evans, so credit there. I have skills, photo manipulation is not one of them XD
 
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Goge Vandire, Hih Theocrat of the Holy Terran Empire, the Imperium of Man’s darker mirror. Unlike Benito, Goge is a ruthless, religiousl-devoted tyrant who preaches that Humanity is superior, and that any deviation from it is heresy, punishable by extermination. Games Workshop is on the record as stating that Goge draws a lot of inspiration from both the Spanish Inquisition and the Grand Mufti.
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An Astartes belonging to the Black Templars. While most Space Marines, being transhumans themselves, find the ide of Human purity laughable and thus align themselves with the Imperium, the Templars do not, and their fanaticism and devotion to Human supremacy has led them and the Dark Angels to throw their lot in with the Holy Terran Empire.
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Astartes belonging to the Vlka Fenryka, or Space Wolves, Chapter of Space Marines. The Space Wolves are unique in that they are Beastmen who’s genes have been spliced with that of Wolves, yet they are able to recieve the genetic alterations nessecary to become transhuman Astartes. Hailing from the icy planet Fenris, the Space Wolves excel in close combat operations, and are loyal to the Imperium of Man and Humanity as a whole.
I'm guessing that the Imperium is based on the more sympathetic interpretations and traits of the OTL imperium, while the Holy Terran Empire is the worst traits of and the most negative interpretation of the OTL imperium, inspired by Nazism, the Pan-arabists, the Grand Mufti, and South African white nationalist ethnopurism

The Tau, assuming we are going with the neo-commies in space interpretation, will have a much less charitable(through Farsight may still be the token less evil Tau member and the Malenkov expy) portrayal than OTL where they are the lesser of all evils, and they'll have a weird hatred for Beastman right?
 
@xie323 , to partially answer your question…
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Tau Fire Caste warriors from Warhammer 40,000. Heavily inspired by Japanese mecha and military science fiction shows, the Tau are sometimes jokingly called “Soace Commies”, due to being a supposedly egalitarian, scientifically-advanced society with no class distinctions and a guiding philosophy that is best described as “Utiltarianism in Space”. In reality, however, the Tau are rigidly hierarchical, with the people divided into social castes. The Etherials, the rulers of the Tau, are on top and considered “first among equals”. The Water Caste are the merchants and diplomats, the Air Caste are the pilots and navy, the Fire Caste are the soldiers and generals, and the Earth Caste, at the very bottom, are the farmers.
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A Witchhunter of the Holy Terran Empire. The Witchhunters, in their drive for Human Purity, travel to planets in the Empire and hunt down and exterminate anyone who deviates, even in the slightest way, from what the ideal Human looks like. Drawing heavily from both the Spanish Inquisition and the Soviet NKVD, the most common victims of the Witchhunters are Beast,en and their families, or Humans who are nonwhite.
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Frateris Militia of the Holy Terran Empire. Despite the i timidating armor and weapons, in-universe the Militias are, man for man, actually worse-equpped than the Imperial Guard of the Imperium. The only thing they have going for them is sheer numbers and zealotry, as well as chemical and atomic weapons.
 
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The carrier Juan Carlos I, flagship of the Armada Española. Spain has operated aircraft carriers since the 1920s and the seaplane tender Dédalo, and with membership of the Roman Alliance would make the transition into serious, large-scale carrier operations - chiefly as a means of demonstrating Spain's ability to operate independently of Italy. That has culminated in the Juan Carlos and her sister-ship Príncipe de Asturias.

While the ships have been heralded as a 'sign of continued Spanish greatness at sea' by the military and various right-wing pundits, their development has not been without its critics. The left criticise what they see as a major waste of resources, something that they guess - correctly - amounted to a sop to a military that's still somewhat bitter about the dismantling of Spain's nuclear arsenal and wants to prove that it's still relevant. The more military-minded figures on the right, meanwhile, are critical of the carrier's lack of catapults - necessitating the use of Dutch-made Fokker-35 VTOL fighters rather than an indigenous design - and its use of a conventional rather than a nuclear propulsion system. However, whatever the truth, both carriers are fully operational now, and will likely have long service lives ahead of them.

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A female soldier of the Legión Española (or a Dama Legiónaria, as fellow Legiónarios would refer to her) stands at attention during a military parade in 2015. The sight of a woman in the military - let alone in the Legion itself - would have been unthinkable during Franco's time, but is a not-uncommon sight nowadays, in large part a consequence of the major liberalisation of Spanish society that took place after the democratisation of Spain. While there was a degree of resistance from military brass initially, today such voices are largely silent, with female members of the forces having distinguished themselves on a number of occasion - the soldier pictured here, for example, had recently been promoted to full Corporal for her display of courage during an operation in Spanish North Africa.

The Legión itself has a long and varied - if somewhat controversial today - record, not merely from the Spanish Civil War, but also from World War II, the Chinese War, the Second Arabian War and various other conflicts from the tumultuous 20th century.

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Aura Garrido, lead star of the popular science-fiction show Ministerio de los Mundos where she plays government agent Pilar Jimenez. A show that's managed to gain somewhat of an audience overseas, Ministerio de los Mundos tells the story of a group of agents who work for a Ministry that monitors - and occasionally intervenes in - a wide range of other parallel dimensions where history went differently.

While some episodes of the show are on the light-hearted side - see, for example, the episode set on an Earth where social status is determined via flamenco competitions - or dip into more 'out-there' science fiction - such as the episode involving an Earth plagued by a parasitic race referred to as Las Plagas - there have been some more serious, hard-hitting and controversial episodes too. The pilot episode, set in a Spain that had never lost the Indies, was an early example of this, as it made a point of showing the negative side of the Spanish imperial heyday (a modern Inquisition, continued slavery, the dominance of the hidalgo class...), though there was little real controversy around that compared to some later episodes. The episode showing a Spain ruled by a revived al-Andalus, for instance, generated a great deal of bile from certain right-wingers for its extremely fair and balanced viewpoint on the subject, while episodes revolving around a Spain where the dictatorship continued - and the (fictional) post-Franco dictator had also discovered multiverse travel and became an arc villain seeking to conquer primitive worlds for Spain - had a great many right-wing viewers in absolute fits. However, the show's popularity with Spanish youth - especially LGBT youth, thanks to Pilar's romance and eventual marriage to Mercedes Vázquez (a refugee from the world visited in the pilot, played by Úrsula Corberó) - ensured that despite occasional storms, it got its full run, with the final episode being broadcast five years after its 2015 debut.​
 
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Members of a vigilante group made up of Native Americans of the Lumbee Tribe - including a number of WWII veterans - breaking up a Ku Klux Klan cell in North Carolina during the 1950s. Similar groups would be a major ally to Federal law enforcement and military units in their efforts to destroy the Klan, with the Lumbee making it a point of honour to drive the Klan out of the parts of North Carolina that they called home. A number of popular country ballads from North Carolina - as well as more modern tunes - commemorate Lumbee resistance to the Klan. For their part, those few apologists the Klan still has often make a point of referring to 'Indian savagery' (most notably, an occasion when Lumbee vigilantes - angered by a Klan attack on a girls' school - captured four Klansmen, strung them up by their ankles and struck them with baseball bats until they were dead, before leaving the bodies to be found with a written warning 'Don't let the sun set on you in Lumbee country, Klansman').

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Early gay-rights protestors in the United States, c. 1956. Despite the many dangers - not least of which was the risk of police brutality - large numbers of highly brave members of the LGBT community would work to try to gain their rights, beginning in the 1950s and continuing from there. Protestors such as those pictures would protest, groups like the Daughters of Bilitis would work to provide information for people questioning their sexuality and would raise money and provide assistance to those living in dangerous situations, and publicly try to create an image of gay and lesbian people as being normal citizens, like any other.

However, the beginnings of change would arguably not be brought about so much by activism alone, but by hatred. Specifically, Klan hatred. The Klan would react violently against any such people in its heartlands, and those who they considered part of 'conspirational homosexuality' - to quote one Grand Wizard - were considered enemies on par with black people and Catholics. This would lead to a series of brutal murders - most infamously in 1957, when a Klan chapter would, on learning of a (very secret) meeting of the Daughters of Bilitis at Radford University, storm it. Ten women were murdered, while the two survivors found by other students were utterly traumatised. The violence inflicted would cause a number of public officials to begin rethinking their attitudes in this matter, which combined with continuing activism would see states beginning to decriminalise same-sex activity between consenting adults during the 1960s, very slowly at first then slightly faster following similar legalisation in Great Britain and other democracies.

Gradually, rights were won, though it would be a patchwork effort primarily driven by individual states, as the Arlington Agreement hamstrung the federal government regarding certain aspects of integration. The Freedom Party would generally place itself in opposition to such efforts, though with their recent defeat in trying to federally prevent individual states allowing same-sex marriage, the Party has accepted gay rights as a 'done deal' and has moved on to other battlegrounds...and there are those who hope to take the Party in a more enlightened direction.

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Art depicting the American comic-book character Diana of Themyscira aka Wonder Woman. Originally created by William Moulton Marston, his wife Elizabeth Holloway Marston and their mutual partner Olive Byrne, the character was highly popular during the war years. However, as a result of the changing political landscape in America post-war, and increasing suspicion of anything 'deviant', the character would vanish from comics following Marston's death in 1950, with the original company not renewing the semi-controversial character.

As such, Wonder Woman entered the public domain...ultimately allowing the character to be used by comic writer Gail Simone. Beginning in 2007, Simone would write the comic Chronicles of the Wonder Woman, a story ultimately encompassing twenty trade paperbacks' worth of work. Chronicles would serve as a 'superhero alternate history', one where Wonder Woman - by joining the Allied war effort - would cause major changes, most notably the defeat of both Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union (and the god Ares, the cause of the war), and would also have a large impact on the development of post-war society. The book would be heralded as a major work of literary and illustrative art, and would provide a rare example of an American comic holding its own and doing well overseas in a market saturated with Italian and Japanese comics, as well as providing an unambiguously optimistic ending (unlike many Italian comics). It would also be much-beloved among LGBTQ comic fans, thanks to Simone's taking Marston's original 'implicit hints' and making Diana officially bisexual, ultimately entering a romance with Etta Candy (a far better and more three-dimensional character than in the original).

Simone is currently writing an original epic fantasy comic series, Paladin's Honor, about a female Paladin. Despite Wonder Woman being in the public domain, there have been no other attempted takes on the character thus far, and most see Simone's take on the character as definitive. Talks are underway regarding a television version of the Chronicles.
A/N: America, political and pop culture :p

ITTL, Simone's Wonder Woman is effectively TTL's Watchmen, only she actually used a 'DC' character.
 
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