Images from the Footprint of Mussolini

@Sorairo had it as canon that China had gay marriage, but they also said that Italy was 'the most liberal member' of the CIS - ahead of China. So if that's the case, and China has gay marriage, then as a more liberal country it stands to reason so does Italy.
I think it’s different being politically or cultural “liberal”. For example, Italy was one of the first western nations to decriminalise homosexuality in 1890 (thanks Zanardelli Code, that outlawed death penalty too) and Fascism didn’t change that (although changing the code to reintroduce death penalty and some forms of pro-family state propaganda). At the opposite United Kingdom punished homosexuality as crime until 1960s (see famous Turing case). But no one would dare to say Fascist Italy was more liberal then UK, right?
So probably Italy is less authoritarian, corrupt, oppressive or something like that then China and for this reason is more liberal although without gay marriage.
 
Be interesting if the PNF in 2020 ITTL was open to homosexuals joining their ranks...though I doubt it.

Probably the party tries to be as traditionalist as possible so it hardly is very open-mind with homosexuals. At least openly homosexual hardly can climb very hight on ranks of the party.
 
I think it’s different being politically or cultural “liberal”. For example, Italy was one of the first western nations to decriminalise homosexuality in 1890 (thanks Zanardelli Code, that outlawed death penalty too) and Fascism didn’t change that (although changing the code to reintroduce death penalty and some forms of pro-family state propaganda). At the opposite United Kingdom punished homosexuality as crime until 1960s (see famous Turing case). But no one would dare to say Fascist Italy was more liberal then UK, right?
So probably Italy is less authoritarian, corrupt, oppressive or something like that then China and for this reason is more liberal although without gay marriage.

Ah. Fair point, then.

Though I didn't know that - I thought Mussolini cracked down on homosexuality, because he wanted Italians to have lots of kids.
 
I think it’s different being politically or cultural “liberal”. For example, Italy was one of the first western nations to decriminalise homosexuality in 1890 (thanks Zanardelli Code, that outlawed death penalty too) and Fascism didn’t change that (although changing the code to reintroduce death penalty and some forms of pro-family state propaganda). At the opposite United Kingdom punished homosexuality as crime until 1960s (see famous Turing case). But no one would dare to say Fascist Italy was more liberal then UK, right?
So probably Italy is less authoritarian, corrupt, oppressive or something like that then China and for this reason is more liberal although without gay marriage.
Well, actually I considered that having a man like Berlinguer at the head of the government, even if only for a few years, would liberalize a lot of issues in Italian society (homosexuality for example). But of course, more than 50 years of fascist rule would make it more difficult in certain areas such as East Africa where only Eritrea recognizes civil unions (not marriage) and Somalia and the Ogaden only recognize marriages in Italy but do not perform them.

I don't think it would be so strange, after all, Spain was ruled by Franco in OTL and today it is one of the most liberal countries (relatively speaking) on the LGBT issue.
 
Italey became democratic again at end of 1970's so both are possible altough I agree that LGBT rights in former fascist nations are bit more advanced than expected. And India too seems quiet advanced. Hadn't it quiet homophobic legistature only just some years ago? So even if the country is more progressive legal LGBT marriage seems bit unlikely.
@Sorairo had it as canon that China had gay marriage, but they also said that Italy was 'the most liberal member' of the CIS - ahead of China. So if that's the case, and China has gay marriage, then as a more liberal country it stands to reason so does Italy.
I mean, it's true that Italy is the most liberal of the CIS members, but the idea that they would have full-on gay marriage sounds rather unlikely: Italy IOTL has it, but still isn't called "marriage", and that's without fifty years of fascist dictatorship. As I stated elsewhere, the most likely option seems to be having it be a "lesser form" of marriage that lacks this or that right.

But anyways, only @Sorairo can tell us how it actually works.

I think it’s different being politically or cultural “liberal”. For example, Italy was one of the first western nations to decriminalise homosexuality in 1890 (thanks Zanardelli Code, that outlawed death penalty too) and Fascism didn’t change that (although changing the code to reintroduce death penalty and some forms of pro-family state propaganda).
I mean, homosexuals were in our reality often condemned to exhile. The island of San Domino was not fictional: that's where they were usually sent. Isola di San Domino - Wikipedia
So I'm pretty sure it was re-introduced as a crime.

Well, actually I considered that having a man like Berlinguer at the head of the government, even if only for a few years, would liberalize a lot of issues in Italian society (homosexuality for example). But of course, more than 50 years of fascist rule would make it more difficult in certain areas such as East Africa where only Eritrea recognizes civil unions (not marriage) and Somalia and the Ogaden only recognize marriages in Italy but do not perform them.

I don't think it would be so strange, after all, Spain was ruled by Franco in OTL and today it is one of the most liberal countries (relatively speaking) on the LGBT issue.
That is true too.
 
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Ah. Fair point, then.

Though I didn't know that - I thought Mussolini cracked down on homosexuality, because he wanted Italians to have lots of kids.
Fascist Italy had a strong pro-family with many children propaganda, even inventing a tax for unmarried men. But homosexuality was not an issue addressed by the Fascist Regime: the idea was that Italy was full of strong and brave men, ready to fight for the Motherland, ecc ecc, so speaking about that would damaging this glorious (and propagandistic) vision.


Well, actually I considered that having a man like Berlinguer at the head of the government, even if only for a few years, would liberalize a lot of issues in Italian society (homosexuality for example). But of course, more than 50 years of fascist rule would make it more difficult in certain areas such as East Africa where only Eritrea recognizes civil unions (not marriage) and Somalia and the Ogaden only recognize marriages in Italy but do not perform them.

I don't think it would be so strange, after all, Spain was ruled by Franco in OTL and today it is one of the most liberal countries (relatively speaking) on the LGBT issue.
Why people tend to think that historical Left is the same of current Left, as the current political issues were the same today and half century ago?
Communist Parties, especially before Cold War’s end, especially Italian communists, were not so enthusiastically pro-gay rights. Simply it was not a big issue in 1970s, not comparing that with economic improvement of working class, divorce or abortion. Communists supported the latter two but avoiding to being too vocal in their support. Berlinguer himself said that “children are a good not only for women but for all the society and for this reason it cannot be an issue involving only women but all the society”, not exactly an endorsement of abortion. By the way, communist country, current or former, were and are not so pro-LGBT rights (a part Russia and Poland, Cuba too has not a LGBT legislation, although Castro legalised abortion when he came to power). The Spanish example doesn’t stand because: Spain+Fascism=Gay Marriage, so we can guess that Spain-Fascism=Gay Marriage, but not that Italy+Fascism=Gay Marriage when Italy-Fascism=No Gay Marriage.

I mean, homosexuals were in our reality often condemned to exhile. The island of San Domino was not fictional: that's where they were usually sent. Isola di San Domino - Wikipedia
So I'm pretty sure it was re-introduced as a crime.
No, homosexuality was not a crime in Fascist Italy. It was used to blacklist political adversaries and sometimes as a pretext to exile someone, but on “obscene acts” grounds, not homosexual ones. Sporadically it could cause a public admonition by public authorities to avoid “public embarrassing life style” but we can not call them a persecution, not comparing that with the rest of Europe (dictatorships but democracies too). It was more a larval campaign to avoid speaking about that and doing like it never existed.
 
Why people tend to think that historical Left is the same of current Left, as the current political issues were the same today and half century ago?
Communist Parties, especially before Cold War’s end, especially Italian communists, were not so enthusiastically pro-gay rights. Simply it was not a big issue in 1970s, not comparing that with economic improvement of working class, divorce or abortion. Communists supported the latter two but avoiding to being too vocal in their support. Berlinguer himself said that “children are a good not only for women but for all the society and for this reason it cannot be an issue involving only women but all the society”, not exactly an endorsement of abortion. By the way, communist country, current or former, were and are not so pro-LGBT rights (a part Russia and Poland, Cuba too has not a LGBT legislation, although Castro legalised abortion when he came to power). The Spanish example doesn’t stand because: Spain+Fascism=Gay Marriage, so we can guess that Spain-Fascism=Gay Marriage, but not that Italy+Fascism=Gay Marriage when Italy-Fascism=No Gay Marriage.
However remember that this Berlinguer is not like OTL Berlinguer, ITTL he's no longer a communist after the Soviet Holocaust and his stance in prison led him to adopt a more humanistic, progressive and liberal way of thinking.
 
UnaRazzaUnaFaccia.png

The slogan "Una Razza, Una Faccia" ("One Race, One Face") written on a wall in Rhodes. The slogan refers to the similarities an shared history between the Italians and the Greeks, and has seen much use in the Fascist propaganda in Greece proper during the Dimitrios Ioannidis years and in the Dodecannese: nowadays, though, its nature is controversial at best in mainland Greece, since the national humiliation Greece suffered under the puppet regime of Ioannidis and the usage of Greek conscripts in Ethiopia by Italy is still very much in living memory. That being said, Italo-Greek relationships in terms of personal interactions have improved since the Seventies, with people from both nations lamenting that their leaders had to make rivals out of them.

Dodecanneso.png

A map of the Dodecanese and the results of an ISTAT poll whose question was "Would you want the dodecanese to be returned to Greece?"

The Dodecanese was conquered by Italy in 1911 after the Italo-Turkish War. Since then, the area has been considered a sort of peaceful backwater of the Italian Empire. In the thirties and Forties, it was the setting stage for urbanistic experimentation with Italian Rationalism architecture, with the construction of cities like Lagogrande/Lakki on the island of Lero and Campo D'Aviazione on Kos. The first is a city mostly visited for the unique architecture by architectural fans and richer tourists looking for an exclusive place to cool off at, while the latter is a city build around the various military installations and weapon factories.

The Dodecannese Greeks have integrated several Italian words in their dialect, and are mostly content with how the Italian administration, which was the reason for why Mainland Greeks hated them and often ostracized them if they happen to move on the mainland, calling them μακαρουράι ("Pasta-rats") and often trying to kick them out of establishments. Nowadays, though, μακαρουράι is considered a sort of racial slur, and Dodecanese Greeks are much mroe accepted in Mainland Greek society, though some suspicions remain.
 

Mark Lenard as Romulan Marshal Virus, a recurring antagonist in the original series of Star Trek. When writing the Original Series, Gene Roddenberry deliberately created a political setup roughly similar to that seen in reality. Earth and the United Federation of Planets stood in for the Western democracies, the Klingon Coordinate was a distinctly unflattering stand-in for the Soviet Union, and the Romulan Star Empire - descended from the Vulcan race - was an obvious 'expy' of the Fascist bloc in general and Italy in particular.

While both Klingons and Romulans became household names, it was the Romulans who received the most consistent development, and the real-world parallels became clear. For instance, the Romulans were shown as being willing to resort to extremely draconian means to keep order within their vast Empire - for which the Federation opposed them - but at the same time, they were shown as being capable of acts of great kindness, such as their rescue of alien refugees from Klingon space that formed the basis of the original series episode 'Refuge'...just as the Italians kept order in their colonies, and yet had also saved vast numbers of Jews.


Andreas Katsulas as Legate - later Consul - Tomalak, a recurring character on Star Trek: A New Generation (1987-1994) and a main character on Star Trek: Babel Station (1993-1999). Starring Patrick Stewart as Captain Jean-Luc Picard and Edward James Olmos as Commander Guillermo Mendoza, ST:ANG is probably the best-known of the many series, while it and Babel Station vie for the title of 'best'.

It was the 'second wave' of Star Trek that saw even further development of the Romulan people and nation, now reformed into a (Second) Republic, and allied to the Federation - as the real-world Fascist powers had reformed into more democratic nations. Now, the Romulans were revealed to have become imperialist as the result of both economic hardship following their settlement of the twin homeworlds of Romulus and Remus, and social upheaval following a costly war against the genocidal, slaving 'Xinti' race - revealed via backstory to have been an early opponent of humanity too. They were also further developed as following a strict honour code, based on a mix of Ancient Roman and Japanese samurai ideals of honour and public standing, and as being a race who placed high value on family. The Tomalak character, through his interactions with the crew of the Enterprise and later Babel Station, served as one of many ways of expounding on the race, while simultaneously somewhat bucking Romulan conventions when necessary. He likewise served as a window on the developing - and at times chaotic - nature of Romulan democracy, and as an example of a 'new breed' of Romulan in his expressions of regret for the actions of the old Empire.

The Tomalak character would ultimately become one of the two Consuls of the Romulan Republic, ending Babel Station with the Romulans and the Federation growing ever-closer together.


Recurring antagonist Ralgha nar Kiranka, Holy Marshal of the Xinti, in the Star Trek: Babel Station episode 'To Loose the Fateful Lightning' (part of the Xinti War arc). Introduced in Star Trek: A New Generation first via backstory dialogue, then later on-screen, the Xinti are a felinoid race and a fundamentalist, expansionist theocracy with a belief that the Xinti race were made by the gods to rule the universe and all other beings are made to serve them (it is believed that the Xinti were inspired by a combination of the Mufti's Islamic Arabia and the resurgent South African regime). In the backstory created gradually, it is revealed that the original Xinti government fought and lost separate wars against Earth and the Romulans, which in turn had contributed to the collapse of said government (and the later apparent extinction of the Xinti via solar supernova). However, by the 'ANG-era', it is revealed in fact that hard-liners in their priestly and military castes, along with a large number of civilians, had evacuated their space and had ultimately found their way through the Bajoran Wormhole, settling new worlds in the Gamma Quadrant. There, they built a new empire, and prepared...

They would be first properly introduced as an antagonist in Season 2 of Babel Station, towards the end of the series, before becoming a recurring arc antagonist throughout the remainder of the show. Ultimately, Seasons 5-7 would be dominated by the Xinti War extended arc, whereby the Xinti - allied with a resurgent Klingon faction - would seek to conquer the Alpha Quadrant. This arc is considered by most to be one of the highlights of the Star Trek franchise, and its long-term effects would be revisited in more recent series. Ralgha nar Kiranka, in particular, is remembered as one of TV's greatest villains.​
 

Mark Lenard as Romulan Marshal Virus, a recurring antagonist in the original series of Star Trek. When writing the Original Series, Gene Roddenberry deliberately created a political setup roughly similar to that seen in reality. Earth and the United Federation of Planets stood in for the Western democracies, the Klingon Coordinate was a distinctly unflattering stand-in for the Soviet Union, and the Romulan Star Empire - descended from the Vulcan race - was an obvious 'expy' of the Fascist bloc in general and Italy in particular.

While both Klingons and Romulans became household names, it was the Romulans who received the most consistent development, and the real-world parallels became clear. For instance, the Romulans were shown as being willing to resort to extremely draconian means to keep order within their vast Empire - for which the Federation opposed them - but at the same time, they were shown as being capable of acts of great kindness, such as their rescue of alien refugees from Klingon space that formed the basis of the original series episode 'Refuge'...just as the Italians kept order in their colonies, and yet had also saved vast numbers of Jews.


Andreas Katsulas as Legate - later Consul - Tomalak, a recurring character on Star Trek: A New Generation (1987-1994) and a main character on Star Trek: Babel Station (1993-1999). Starring Patrick Stewart as Captain Jean-Luc Picard and Edward James Olmos as Commander Guillermo Mendoza, ST:ANG is probably the best-known of the many series, while it and Babel Station vie for the title of 'best'.

It was the 'second wave' of Star Trek that saw even further development of the Romulan people and nation, now reformed into a (Second) Republic, and allied to the Federation - as the real-world Fascist powers had reformed into more democratic nations. Now, the Romulans were revealed to have become imperialist as the result of both economic hardship following their settlement of the twin homeworlds of Romulus and Remus, and social upheaval following a costly war against the genocidal, slaving 'Xinti' race - revealed via backstory to have been an early opponent of humanity too. They were also further developed as following a strict honour code, based on a mix of Ancient Roman and Japanese samurai ideals of honour and public standing, and as being a race who placed high value on family. The Tomalak character, through his interactions with the crew of the Enterprise and later Babel Station, served as one of many ways of expounding on the race, while simultaneously somewhat bucking Romulan conventions when necessary. He likewise served as a window on the developing - and at times chaotic - nature of Romulan democracy, and as an example of a 'new breed' of Romulan in his expressions of regret for the actions of the old Empire.

The Tomalak character would ultimately become one of the two Consuls of the Romulan Republic, ending Babel Station with the Romulans and the Federation growing ever-closer together.


Recurring antagonist Ralgha nar Kiranka, Holy Marshal of the Xinti, in the Star Trek: Babel Station episode 'To Loose the Fateful Lightning' (part of the Xinti War arc). Introduced in Star Trek: A New Generation first via backstory dialogue, then later on-screen, the Xinti are a felinoid race and a fundamentalist, expansionist theocracy with a belief that the Xinti race were made by the gods to rule the universe and all other beings are made to serve them (it is believed that the Xinti were inspired by a combination of the Mufti's Islamic Arabia and the resurgent South African regime). In the backstory created gradually, it is revealed that the original Xinti government fought and lost separate wars against Earth and the Romulans, which in turn had contributed to the collapse of said government (and the later apparent extinction of the Xinti via solar supernova). However, by the 'ANG-era', it is revealed in fact that hard-liners in their priestly and military castes, along with a large number of civilians, had evacuated their space and had ultimately found their way through the Bajoran Wormhole, settling new worlds in the Gamma Quadrant. There, they built a new empire, and prepared...

They would be first properly introduced as an antagonist in Season 2 of Babel Station, towards the end of the series, before becoming a recurring arc antagonist throughout the remainder of the show. Ultimately, Seasons 5-7 would be dominated by the Xinti War extended arc, whereby the Xinti - allied with a resurgent Klingon faction - would seek to conquer the Alpha Quadrant. This arc is considered by most to be one of the highlights of the Star Trek franchise, and its long-term effects would be revisited in more recent series. Ralgha nar Kiranka, in particular, is remembered as one of TV's greatest villains.​
Fantastic! Who would be the stand-in for the ROC?
 

Mark Lenard as Romulan Marshal Virus, a recurring antagonist in the original series of Star Trek. When writing the Original Series, Gene Roddenberry deliberately created a political setup roughly similar to that seen in reality. Earth and the United Federation of Planets stood in for the Western democracies, the Klingon Coordinate was a distinctly unflattering stand-in for the Soviet Union, and the Romulan Star Empire - descended from the Vulcan race - was an obvious 'expy' of the Fascist bloc in general and Italy in particular.

While both Klingons and Romulans became household names, it was the Romulans who received the most consistent development, and the real-world parallels became clear. For instance, the Romulans were shown as being willing to resort to extremely draconian means to keep order within their vast Empire - for which the Federation opposed them - but at the same time, they were shown as being capable of acts of great kindness, such as their rescue of alien refugees from Klingon space that formed the basis of the original series episode 'Refuge'...just as the Italians kept order in their colonies, and yet had also saved vast numbers of Jews.


Andreas Katsulas as Legate - later Consul - Tomalak, a recurring character on Star Trek: A New Generation (1987-1994) and a main character on Star Trek: Babel Station (1993-1999). Starring Patrick Stewart as Captain Jean-Luc Picard and Edward James Olmos as Commander Guillermo Mendoza, ST:ANG is probably the best-known of the many series, while it and Babel Station vie for the title of 'best'.

It was the 'second wave' of Star Trek that saw even further development of the Romulan people and nation, now reformed into a (Second) Republic, and allied to the Federation - as the real-world Fascist powers had reformed into more democratic nations. Now, the Romulans were revealed to have become imperialist as the result of both economic hardship following their settlement of the twin homeworlds of Romulus and Remus, and social upheaval following a costly war against the genocidal, slaving 'Xinti' race - revealed via backstory to have been an early opponent of humanity too. They were also further developed as following a strict honour code, based on a mix of Ancient Roman and Japanese samurai ideals of honour and public standing, and as being a race who placed high value on family. The Tomalak character, through his interactions with the crew of the Enterprise and later Babel Station, served as one of many ways of expounding on the race, while simultaneously somewhat bucking Romulan conventions when necessary. He likewise served as a window on the developing - and at times chaotic - nature of Romulan democracy, and as an example of a 'new breed' of Romulan in his expressions of regret for the actions of the old Empire.

The Tomalak character would ultimately become one of the two Consuls of the Romulan Republic, ending Babel Station with the Romulans and the Federation growing ever-closer together.


Recurring antagonist Ralgha nar Kiranka, Holy Marshal of the Xinti, in the Star Trek: Babel Station episode 'To Loose the Fateful Lightning' (part of the Xinti War arc). Introduced in Star Trek: A New Generation first via backstory dialogue, then later on-screen, the Xinti are a felinoid race and a fundamentalist, expansionist theocracy with a belief that the Xinti race were made by the gods to rule the universe and all other beings are made to serve them (it is believed that the Xinti were inspired by a combination of the Mufti's Islamic Arabia and the resurgent South African regime). In the backstory created gradually, it is revealed that the original Xinti government fought and lost separate wars against Earth and the Romulans, which in turn had contributed to the collapse of said government (and the later apparent extinction of the Xinti via solar supernova). However, by the 'ANG-era', it is revealed in fact that hard-liners in their priestly and military castes, along with a large number of civilians, had evacuated their space and had ultimately found their way through the Bajoran Wormhole, settling new worlds in the Gamma Quadrant. There, they built a new empire, and prepared...

They would be first properly introduced as an antagonist in Season 2 of Babel Station, towards the end of the series, before becoming a recurring arc antagonist throughout the remainder of the show. Ultimately, Seasons 5-7 would be dominated by the Xinti War extended arc, whereby the Xinti - allied with a resurgent Klingon faction - would seek to conquer the Alpha Quadrant. This arc is considered by most to be one of the highlights of the Star Trek franchise, and its long-term effects would be revisited in more recent series. Ralgha nar Kiranka, in particular, is remembered as one of TV's greatest villains.​
So I'm guessing the Klingons get less...sympathy? in this version of Star Trek?
 
Fantastic! Who would be the stand-in for the ROC?

The Orions - an old star nation, who had internal problems and were divided (many turning to piracy or slaving). Then one faction grew stronger with Romulan help...and now they’re a major power once more.


So I'm guessing the Klingons get less...sympathy? in this version of Star Trek?
Pretty much. They remained more like their OTL TOS portrayal (minus the yellowface but plus the merciless Orwellian thing).
 
Speaking of TV shows, here is my take on DokiDoki! Pretty Cure. And boy, it would be quite different in themes, being less like it's OTL self and more like 'Starship Troopers with frilly dresses instead of Marauder Suits.'

(PS: No secret identity formula here in this TTL's PreCure franchise. Also, the PreCures sometimes use guns and gadgets in their work alongside magical items, attacks and hand to hand combat, mostly when dealing with human enemies.)



DVD cover art of DokiDoki PreCure, an instalment in the Pretty Cure franchise and the tenth series in the franchise. Set in the fictional town of Oogai Town, it follows the adventures of the titular PreCures who in this universe are the Legendary Protectors of both Earth and the Splendorious Kingdom. After an attack by the Jikochuus; demons born from selfishness onto Splendorious , the fairies of the Splendorious Kingdom set off to find volunteers to become the Pretty Cures, the Legendary Protectors. After a encounter with the Pretty Cures from her security cameras and a meeting with Lance; one of the fairies hailing from the Splendorious Kingdom. Alice Yotsuba, the heiress of Yotsuba Industries volunteers to become one of the Legendary Protectors, the Pretty Cure. Fighting under the name of Cure Rosetta together with her friends against the Selfishes and other magical threats against Earth. Her team of Pretty Cures is aided by the police of Oogai Town in their efforts in both training and equipment.

The series marks a significant departure from the Pretty Cure series formula . Firstly, Alice Yotsuba (the main protagonist) bucks the trend of previous protagonists having pink colours and being the leader of the team (Mana Aida/Cure Heart is still the team leader and is pink in her PreCure form) . Secondly, the series uses less of the typical monster of the week formula common in such shows in the genre, dividing episode time to show how the Earth government works in the form of flashbacks to Alice's history and moral philosophy classes, interposed with action scenes and fighting the threats against Earth and the Splendorious Kingdom.

The series draws clear inspiration from Starship Troopers (in fact, Robert A. Heinlein, the author of Starship Troopers is thanked in it's credits and the production staff and CV seiyus even have to read through the novel a few times before production began!) in it's themes of civic virtue, corporal punishment and juvenile delinquency and the fact that the government of Earth limits franchise to those willing to sacrifice their time and risk their safety to serve the government. Additionally, some scenes in DokiDoki PreCure homage the Starship Troopers novel such as the training scenes and the flogging that Alice received for getting someone (a police officer) caught in the blast radius of a simulated explosion via negligence (though unlike the Starship Troopers novel which used a nuke, it was a breaching grenade). Viewers who had read the Starship Troopers novel even realised that the society of the Splendorious Kingdom before the Selfishes attacked and the human minions of the Byogens (monsters born out of the suffering of diseases who want to poison the Earth into a lifeless husk) , one of the threats that the PreCures faced in the series can be used as an allegory for the 'social democracies of the 20th century that collapsed' and the Pseudo-Arachnids/Bugs in the novel respectively and others noticed the similarities between Juan 'Johnny" Rico who is the protagonist of the Starship Troopers novel and Alice Yotsuba .While some reviewers panned the similarities of Starship Troopers that DokiDoki! PreCure had in it's themes, viewing it as 'The fascism that Starship Troopers presented and should have died out with the fall of Facism in Italy but in a frilly dress' others praised it for it's successful retelling of the themes that Starship Troopers presented in another genre. One reviewer even said; "It is simple to write a rebuttal of the themes of Starship Troopers, but to retell the central themes of Starship Troopers in another format and genre, that is a difficult thing altogether. In this regard, DokiDoki! PreCure blows my expectations out of the water."
 
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Leon Rupnik, only president of short-lived (December 1943 - February 1944) Slovene National State, basically puppet of nazi Germany.

Rupnik had long career on Yguslavian army. After Yugsolavia lost Thrid Balkans War in 1940 Rupnik fled to Berlin where he organised with approval of nazi leadership Slovene Home Guard. But it was yet quiet useless when Germany wasn't in war with Italy. But when Germany invaded North Italy in 1943, Rupnik and his Home Guard captured quickly Lubiana/Ljubljana and established Slovene National State. It took quickly harsh nationalist politics and begun persecute Italians and Jews. Slovene Home Guard too participated to Battle of Trieste.

Slovene National State anyway ceased from existence rapidly when Italians bombed Lubiana to ground on February 1944. Rupnik's body wasn't ever found but it is believed that he was killed during the bombing.
 
What would Margaret Thatcher be doing ITTL?
Everything but being in power, I think. Assuming she still studies Chemistry, she becomes a scientist inventing a new form of plastic or perfects an existing one that is basically known only to experts in the sectors; if she happens to decide to go into politics, she gets elected mayor of Grantham at best before retiring. and that's assuming she just doesn't decide to use her... imposing personality, to rank up in the academia.
 
What would Margaret Thatcher be doing ITTL?
Everything but being in power, I think. Assuming she still studies Chemistry, she becomes a scientist inventing a new form of plastic or perfects an existing one that is basically known only to experts in the sectors; if she happens to decide to go into politics, she gets elected mayor of Grantham at best before retiring. and that's assuming she just doesn't decide to use her... imposing personality, to rank up in the academia.

She’s mentioned in the 2020 update that she helps in the establishment of the Imperial Federation.
 
I got some ideas for this Germany' s Leopard 2 equivalent. the Panzerkampfwagen 79 Lowe (Lion):






A Pzkpfw 79A4 'Lowe' on display at an exhibition in Singapore. The Pzkpfw 79 Lowe stems from a development project (MBT-70) by the US and West Germany to develop a tank that would replace the M60 and the Pzkpfw 65 'Leopard' in both the US Army and the Deutsches Heer respectively. Unfortunately, scope creep and disagreements led to the partners pursuing their own tank replacement projects and cancelling the joint project altogether. West Germany was also involved with upgrading the Pzkpfw 65 to also extend it's service life in case if the joint project fell through. The knowledge from the upgrade programme was implemented together with the technologies gleamed from the MBT-70 project to create the Pzkpfw 79 'Lowe' which entered service in 1979. Armed with a Rheinmetall L/44 (A0 [retroactively] to A5) or a L/55 (A5 onwards) 120mm smoothbore main gun, it is known for it's speed and alongside with serving in the Deutsches Reichwehrmacht, it is also an export success and many countries such as the Republic of China have also adopted the Lowe.
 
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