Images from The Anglo/American-Nazi War

In OTL, I believe he was a tragic casualty of the Warsaw uprising. It's nice to know he has an even more legendary and heroic profile here!
Yes, IOTL he was executed by the Germans on the orders of Himmler after he refused to collaborate with the Germans against the Soviets. Calbear created his backstory and him being at the Battle of Berlin, but I decided to have him as interim President of Poland and I created his later biography.

Anyways here are some Australia photos.

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Robert Menzies (1894-1981), Prime Minister of Australia from 1939 to 1941 and 1949 to 1963. Curtin was PM during most of WWII, along with Arthur Fadden (1941), John Curtin (1941-1945) and Ben Chifley (1945-1949). Menzies' time as PM saw the major participation of the Australian armed forces during the Western European campaign of 1958-1959, his inspirational leadership during the later phase of the war and the rise of Australia as a major world power and a member of the A-4. Menzies, along with Curtin, is considered one of the best PMs in Australian history.

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H.W. Evatt, PM of Australia from 1963 until his death in office on November 1, 1965. In the Australian election of 1963, the majority of the Australian electorate, fresh from the victory in the Second World War, desired a change of government from the post-war era. Evatt's brief premiership saw the rise of Australia as a major member of the A-4.

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Arthur Calwell (1896-1972), PM of Australia from 1965-1966. The Calwell premiership fell from power due to the codicil that the A-4 powers would act as guarantors of payment of Japanese reparations to India and Chinese in return for Indian and Chinese pledges not to attempt to enforce payment by force of arms. This codicil that Australiia would be a guarantor to these payments led to the Calwell government suffering a vote of no-confidence from the Australian parliment, which was slightly dominated by the conservative Liberal-National coalition. Thus, a new Liberal government under Harold Holt (1908-2005) was formed and which lasted until 1972, when Labor returned to power under Prime Minister Gough Whitlam.
 
Here are some more FaceApp photos.

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Farouk Bulsara (1946- ), President of India from 1998-2006.

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Official Portrait of President Dai Li of China (1897-1979), founder of the radical Cabal regime, circa 1970.

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King Peter II of Yugoslavia and later King Peter II of Serbia (1923-2000).
 
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President Joseph P. Kennedy Jr. (July 25, 1915- October 19, 1996), POTUS from 1953-1965 and during the later phase of WWII from 1954-1960, photographed in
1955.

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Former President JPK Jr. in 1995.

(Once again these were made with FaceApp).
 
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Just a few photos to explore how the alternate civil rights movement and Southern reaction would've gone.

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Bayard Rustin emerged during the WW2 Era as the most prominent leader of the Civil Rights Movement.

Throughout the 1940s and 1950s, through his Brotherhood for Civil Equality, he pursued the strategy of tying the movement for civil rights to both the war effort and the fight against Nazi tyranny. He also served as an unofficial advisor to the Truman and Kennedy administrations, formulating the strategy of using laws against wartime sabotage to crack down on discrimination in the armed forces and the defense industry. It was largely through his efforts that civil rights legislation was passed in the 1960s and 1970s. He was appointed Secretary of Labor by President Kennedy in 1959, becoming the first black and LGBT cabinet member, serving in that post until 1965, when President Goldwater appointed him Ambassador to Britain, a post he would hold in 1968. Rustin would serve in numerous government offices related to anti-poverty efforts until his death in 1987.

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James Eastland was a senator from Mississippi (1943-1960). James Eastland was representative of the reactionary Boll-Weevil wing of the Southern Democratic Party. He became infamous for his obstructionist attitudes toward the social and economic policies of the FDR, Truman, and Kennedy presidencies. He was particularly known for his hostility toward the civil rights movement and attempts at desegregating government offices. While his hardline stances were initially popular in Mississippi, they gradually wore away at his popularity in his home state as the benefits of government investment became clear and Nazi brutality made racism less acceptable than it was at the beginning of his career. In 1960, Eastland's career collapsed over his anti-semitic remarks to Jewish members of Congress [1]. With backing from Mississippi Democrats and President Kennedy, he would lose the Democratic Primary in 1960. He retired quietly to his cotton farm, leaving the Senate early to give his successor seniority and frequently being hounded by the Labor Department over his treatment of black workers on his cotton farm before dying in 1986.

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William Winter, Senator from Mississippi (1960-1997), represented the emergence of the New South, which (gradually) abandoned its obsessive oppression of the black community and modernized due to the economic and technological advancements of the Second World War.

Having served in the US Army during both phases of the war (1943-1947, 1951-1956), he was rewarded for his services by being appointed to the Head Mississippi USO office in 1957. While he didn't directly integrate his office, he tried to ensure black veterans had been given decent accommodations.

In 1960, he defeated James Eastland in the Mississippi Democratic Primary and became Senator, serving until 1997. While Winter never directly supported civil rights legislation, he no longer denounced integration as vociferously as past Mississippi politicians did. While this tactic can be seen as opportunistic, his shrewd ability to play various sides of Mississippi politics ensured he would become one of the most powerful politicians in the Senate, retiring in 1997 as "The Magnolia Magnate". He died in 2020. [2]

[1] OTL, Eastland showed a venomous anti-semitism, which ITTL would be seen as even less acceptable.

[2] Winter was known for his political dancing on the issue of civil rights and can be seen as a transitional figure in Southern politics.
 
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Here is a good book on William Winter:

 
Here is a good book on William Winter:


I figured his reputation as a moderate reformer, or de facto enabler depending on your point og view, would make him an even more prominent politician in a world where racism and anti-Semitism were even more taboo.

He would be a sign that for all the horrors of this TL, many things are much better.
 
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Just wondering what did happen to two other notorious Southern senators, Strom Thurmond and Jesse Helms. At least Thurmond's career ends pretty early if he can't shut his racist views. Not sure about Helms.
 
Just wondering what did happen to two other notorious Southern senators, Strom Thurmond and Jesse Helms. At least Thurmond's career ends pretty early if he can't shut his racist views. Not sure about Helms.

I think that's a complicated question. Because, even with the TTL Nazi empire making racism even far less acceptable, would racism in America truly go away?

I think the explicit and profane forms of racism would become less acceptable far more quickly, hence James Eastland's brand of politics would make him a pariah. The colossal military-industrial complex and technological innovations might give Black Americans a much easier ladder to climb. Maybe hate crime and civil rights legislation are far more extensive.

But what about the more implicit and institutional racism?

Will police departments continue to have arrest quotas, close rank when one of their own is charged with a hate crime, and have a low bar for a suspect resisting arrest? Will urban planners like Robert Moses destroy minority communities to build highways, and will banks still deploy redlining and other discriminatory lending practices? Would drug war tasks forces crack down harder on poorer communities?

Would explicit racism be less common? Probably. Would institutional racism continue to dog America? That's a tougher nut to crack.
 
I think that's a complicated question. Because, even with the TTL Nazi empire making racism even far less acceptable, would racism in America truly go away?

I think the explicit and profane forms of racism would become less acceptable far more quickly, hence James Eastland's brand of politics would make him a pariah. The colossal military-industrial complex and technological innovations might give Black Americans a much easier ladder to climb. Maybe hate crime and civil rights legislation are far more extensive.

But what about the more implicit and institutional racism?

Will police departments continue to have arrest quotas, close rank when one of their own is charged with a hate crime, and have a low bar for a suspect resisting arrest? Will urban planners like Robert Moses destroy minority communities to build highways, and will banks still deploy redlining and other discriminatory lending practices? Would drug war tasks forces crack down harder on poorer communities?

Would explicit racism be less common? Probably. Would institutional racism continue to dog America? That's a tougher nut to crack.

True. Surely outright and open racism is basically extinct but there might indeed be some institutional more invisible racism which would be harder to wipe off.
 
I think that's a complicated question. Because, even with the TTL Nazi empire making racism even far less acceptable, would racism in America truly go away?

I think the explicit and profane forms of racism would become less acceptable far more quickly, hence James Eastland's brand of politics would make him a pariah. The colossal military-industrial complex and technological innovations might give Black Americans a much easier ladder to climb. Maybe hate crime and civil rights legislation are far more extensive.

But what about the more implicit and institutional racism?

Will police departments continue to have arrest quotas, close rank when one of their own is charged with a hate crime, and have a low bar for a suspect resisting arrest? Will urban planners like Robert Moses destroy minority communities to build highways, and will banks still deploy redlining and other discriminatory lending practices? Would drug war tasks forces crack down harder on poorer communities?

Would explicit racism be less common? Probably. Would institutional racism continue to dog America? That's a tougher nut to crack.
I think it will eventually will fade into nothing as long as there is continuous attacks on it, according to CalBear discriminatory feelings among the public have faded until only a small minority support it. Which he described as those being born before the destruction of Europe. By 2024, outside of small minority and the more hidden forms that’s almost impossible to destroy (I.e. imbalances from the older generation in equality of service, and the Native Americans invisibility). There should be little institutional discrimination, and likely greater recognition of minority (ethnic/religious/cultural/women) achievements.
 
I think it will eventually will fade into nothing as long as there is continuous attacks on it, according to CalBear discriminatory feelings among the public have faded until only a small minority support it. Which he described as those being born before the destruction of Europe. By 2024, outside of small minority and the more hidden forms that’s almost impossible to destroy (I.e. imbalances from the older generation in equality of service, and the Native Americans invisibility). There should be little institutional discrimination, and likely greater recognition of minority (ethnic/religious/cultural/women) achievements.

I know, but America's OTL history makes me slightly pessimistic about how far that can go. Sure, we elected a black President, but near the end of his term, he visited a jail and thought, "I could've ended up here under different circumstances."
 
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Women in Kabal Afghanistan wearing A-4 style dresses in the 1960s. The appearance of these women wearing these clothes would lead to a hostile reaction in the countryside. It would take a personal threat of Indian intervention to prevent an uprising. This would lead future Afghanistan leaders to be more careful in trending the line between tradition and “modernization”. India pop-culture would also permeate Afghanistan during this time period. The greater Indian influence culturally and politically lead to greater religious and minority tolerance. Chiefly among the different tribes in both rural and urban areas. This would help the Kingdom integrate the new provinces it gained from the fall of Soviet Central Asia.

The Kingdom of Afghanistan stands today as a semi-democratic semi-constitutional monarchy respected in the world for its tolerance of minorities. Afghanistan is also recognized as a crucial trading block between the CSI and U.N.
 
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Picture of a Japanese family arriving in Brazil, c. 1954.

While Brazil's post-1950s economic boom, known as the Miracle of the Equator, created many opportunities, it also triggered a massive labor shortage. Brazil's traditional sources of immigration, mainly Southern Europe, were cut off due to the war. The numerous authoritarian governments that controlled Europe, North America, Australia, Southern Africa, and Argentina were more attractive destinations in the era before air conditioning became ubiquitous.

Despite his xenophobic nationalism, Getulio Vargas solved the problem by reopening Japanese immigration in 1951. Due to the Pacific Theatre of the War being in the recent past, few nations opened their door to Japanese migration. With its economy wrecked by the war, there was no shortage of Japanese who wanted to leave their country for a better life elsewhere.

Between 1950-1970, roughly 1.5 million Japanese settled permanently in Brazil. Unlike the previous Japanese migration, which consisted primarily of agricultural contract laborers, the new migrants arrived with greater technical immigration due to Japan's migration and helped Brazil's post-war industrial boom. This led to Brazil having the largest overseas Japanese community, with 4 million Brazilians [1] claiming Japanese descent.





Picture of The Japanese Festival in Curitiba.

Curitiba, the capital of the state Parana, received a large Japanese population due to being one of the epicenters of Brazil's economic expansion, with the Japanese making up 10% [2] of the population by the early 21st century. Its large Asian community led it to being nicknamed "Tokyo of the Equator".




Ukrainian church in Prudentopolis.

With the end of the war in 1960, the revelations of Nazi brutality in Eastern Europe created no shortage of public sympathy throughout the world for its inhabitants, who endured borderline slave conditions if they were lucky. President Juscelino Kubitschek saw an opportunity to develop farmland in Brazil and negotiated with the West Ukrainian government to welcome refugees in exchange for aid.

Between 1960 and 1980, 300,000 West Ukrainians migrated to Brazil, most of whom settled around the already majority Ukrainian Prudentopolis, which grew to a population of 250,000 [3] by 2000. The Ukrainian community in Brazil, despite its economic success, has remained among the least assimilated of Brazil's ethnic minorities, with many youths speaking Ukrainian well into the 20th century, which some attribute to the trauma born from decades of mass murder and oppression under both Communism and Nazism.

[1] OTL, the number is about 2 million.

[2] OTL, that number is about 1%.

[3] OTL, Prudentopolis, has a population of 50,000.
 
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