If Sol Invictus had become the main western religion, could it survive until our days?

Christianity has an immaterial, omniscient and omnipresent god who, with the advancement of science and our knowledge of the universe, can hide in that which we still do not know. What was there before the Big Bang? God What started the universe? God etc...
However, The Sol invictus is the worship of the Sun, a material entity that we can see and, with the advancement of science, we know what it is, what it is composed of, when it was born, when and how it will die and that it is not unique. or special.
How would this religion evolve? Or could it not survive the test of time?
 
Sol Invictus's personification is the Sun, which is independent from the physical object that we call the Sun. So more knowledge about the Sun wouldn't exactly kill worship of Sol Invictus any more than people learning more about engineering rivers killed the worship of river gods. Even OTL, the Hindu sun god Surya is still worshipped in parts of India and in Bali.

I would say the bigger threat to Sol Invictus is that pagan cults change with the centuries based on social conditions and state patronage of their temples. For instance, Surya is not as widely worshipped today as in pre-Islamic India. So Sol Invictus might become a marginal deity outside of, say, Italy due to vanishing with the Roman Empire and the new Romano-Germanic kingdoms preferring a different god instead.
 
To my knowledge, the cult of Sol in late Rome was a very top-down religion. It existed as a native cult in Rome but it was through the deliberate promotion of emperors that Sol was given a central role in the pantheon (not as a monotheistic faith, should be added - Sol was supposed to be the highest of the gods, not the only god). I'm not sure if it's ever been conclusively proven that it was popular among the population. Once Rome adopts Christianity, it quickly vanishes from the historic record.

That's not to say that this forbids it from ever growing prominent and a permanent fixture of Europe, but its future will be directly connected with the future of the Roman Empire. If Rome still falls in the 5th century I'm not sure if it will last.
 
The main problem of Sol Invictus veneration is finding a way to defeat Christianity in what will become the ERE. If it can be associated to Roman Power in the same way that happened to Christianity OTL, either through the Empire managing to become great again or by penetrating into East Roman government, it will then secure its resilience and likely have the prestige and influence to back its presence well.
 
To my knowledge, the cult of Sol in late Rome was a very top-down religion. It existed as a native cult in Rome but it was through the deliberate promotion of emperors that Sol was given a central role in the pantheon (not as a monotheistic faith, should be added - Sol was supposed to be the highest of the gods, not the only god). I'm not sure if it's ever been conclusively proven that it was popular among the population. Once Rome adopts Christianity, it quickly vanishes from the historic record.

That's not to say that this forbids it from ever growing prominent and a permanent fixture of Europe, but its future will be directly connected with the future of the Roman Empire. If Rome still falls in the 5th century I'm not sure if it will last.
It didn't really disappear until well into the 7th Century. John Chrysostom encountered them in Sicily, Jacob Bar Salibi mentions in his treatise that many followers of Sol Invictus survived well into Justinian's reign in Greece and Anatolia as well. During the rediscovery of the Temple of Ephesus, John Turtle Wood found many inscriptions carbon dated to the 5th century honoring Artemis/Diana for being the honoured sister of Sol Invictus
 
It didn't really disappear until well into the 7th Century. John Chrysostom encountered them in Sicily, Jacob Bar Salibi mentions in his treatise that many followers of Sol Invictus survived well into Justinian's reign in Greece and Anatolia as well. During the rediscovery of the Temple of Ephesus, John Turtle Wood found many inscriptions carbon dated to the 5th century honoring Artemis/Diana for being the honoured sister of Sol Invictus
John Chrysostom was a late 4th century bishop and so in his time the imperial cult of Sol was still in living memory - and similarly, the Temple of Ephesus was likely destroyed in the late 4th century or early 5th century, less than a century after Constantine's conversion to Christianity. In religion terms, that is no time at all.

On the 7th century, I'd be glad to hear specific information. Jacob Bar Salibi talks about the Sol connection with the date of Christmas but he quotes another, unnamed author who is believed to have written in the 4th century, I wasn't aware of him mentioning the cult of Sol and its longevity.
 
A interesting factor is the lack of sun or moon worship among the Germanic people, yes they had gods for both, but they were of little importance. As such it’s hard to imagine the faith spread among the Germanic invaders. As a top-down religion closely connected to imperial central power, we could easily see it completely collapse in the Germanic invasions, similar to the collapse of Zoroastrianism in the Arabic invasion of Iran,
 
I mean by this logic Greek gods worship would have died out if you climbed mount Olympus but the idea developed that physical Olympus wasn't the same place as Olympus home of the Gods I think. The same would occur with sol Invictus
 
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