If Practicable: The Confederacy wins at Gettysburg.

He's gone back to Virginia
I missed that. Tactically yes that is the wise move to make on the chess board of the eastern theater of the war.

I have much respect for you too

but...

That would bring up alot of political issues for Lee once he gets back to Virginia Davis and Company had bet the farm on Lee achieving a major victory in all capital letters. And Lee knew this, its partly what made him go all in on July 3rd. Him fighting a minor action and runing back to Virginia is political very bad for Davis like could maybe warrant Lee being removed from Command. Especially now that Vicksburg is gone. Strategically the Gettysburg campaign is a goose egg. As soon as he arrives in Virginia he would have the pressure to detach one of his corps to send them West that was there before the campaign will be back and magnified.
"make Europe sit up and take notice"
Maybe enough to get the Laird Rams delivered and maybe the CSS Stonewall building in France isn't delayed as long but as far as reconization not a chance.

@Dude-a-Buck great story I'm enjoying it ignore my rant and continue on.😀
 
That would bring up alot of political issues for Lee once he gets back to Virginia Davis and Company had bet the farm on Lee achieving a major victory in all capital letters. And Lee knew this, its partly what made him go all in on July 3rd. Him fighting a minor action and runing back to Virginia is political very bad for Davis like could maybe warrant Lee being removed from Command. Especially now that Vicksburg is gone. Strategically the Gettysburg campaign is a goose egg. As soon as he arrives in Virginia he would have the pressure to detach one of his corps to send them West that was there before the campaign will be back and magnified.

Maybe enough to get the Laird Rams delivered and maybe the CSS Stonewall building in France isn't delayed as long but as far as reconization not a chance.
I completely disagree. The situation is much better than OTL where Lee ran back to Virginia in defeat and with his army mauled. In this scenario Lee is victorious. His army was able to forage in Pennsylvania before returning home & their spirits are no doubt extremely high.

Remove Lee from command? Why on Earth would Davis do that? Lee won. His star will be even brighter than before. Even in OTL Lee wasn't removed, and that was after a stinging defeat. Everyone knew Lee was irreplaceable. There is absolutely no way anyone will even think for a second about removing him, especially now that he's proved he can win on Union soil. It might be minor, but the morale implications are important. Many will see it as yet another defeat for the Army of the Potomac, especially since they will be seen as having failed to defend the Union state of Pennsylvania. And let's be honest, the Gettysburg campaign was a glorified raid. In this situation, it really is just that. Lee gave Virginia a brief reprieve from fighting and gave his troops some food and rest before the next big fight.

In terms of sending troops west, I agree. Perhaps we could see ole' Stonewall go west in this scenario as he still lives. With a stronger Army of Northern Virginia, Lee and Longstreet could be an even tougher nut to crack than in reality. General Grant will have a much tougher time pushing Lee back, especially if Stonewall does go west and causes problems for the Union. Perhaps Grant would have to send troops west himself.

Anyway, a lot to think about here so it'll be very interesting to see where this goes.

In terms of recognition, I agree it isn't coming any time soon, but with this victory, it leaves the door open just a bit. And if the war continues go to poorly in the East [which is where most of the news coverage was] than it could lead to even more problems for Lincoln and strengthen the peace movement.​
 
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In terms of sending troops west, I agree. Perhaps we could see ole' Stonewall go west in this scenario as he still lives. With a stronger Army of Northern Virginia, Lee and Longstreet could be an even tougher nut to crack than in reality. General Grant will have a much tougher time pushing Lee back, especially if Stonewall does go west and causes problems for the Union. Perhaps Grant would have to send troops west himself.

I agree sending the aggressive Jackson west is the better option and Longstreet is better suited mentally to defend against grant

In terms of recognition, I agree it isn't coming any time soon, but with this victory, it leaves the door open just a bit. And if the war continues go to poorly in the East [which is where most of the news coverage was] than it could lead to even more problems for Lincoln and strengthen the peace movement.

That last part is the key here does this embolden the Copperheads to run an actual peace Democrat in place of McClellan

Anyway, a lot to think about here so it'll be very interesting to see where this goes.
Agreed
 
I missed that. Tactically yes that is the wise move to make on the chess board of the eastern theater of the war.

I have much respect for you too

but...

That would bring up alot of political issues for Lee once he gets back to Virginia Davis and Company had bet the farm on Lee achieving a major victory in all capital letters. And Lee knew this, its partly what made him go all in on July 3rd. Him fighting a minor action and runing back to Virginia is political very bad for Davis like could maybe warrant Lee being removed from Command. Especially now that Vicksburg is gone. Strategically the Gettysburg campaign is a goose egg. As soon as he arrives in Virginia he would have the pressure to detach one of his corps to send them West that was there before the campaign will be back and magnified.

Maybe enough to get the Laird Rams delivered and maybe the CSS Stonewall building in France isn't delayed as long but as far as reconization not a chance.

@Dude-a-Buck great story I'm enjoying it ignore my rant and continue on.😀
I think it'd work if Lee decided to stay put at Gettysburg or nearby, waiting for the Union to attack while taking supplies from the North and spreading chaos. Even with such a minor victory, staying on Northern soil unchallenged would be a huge success for the South
 
The Tullahoma and Chickamauga campaigns.
When historians write of the civil war during June & July of 1863, they tend to focus on either the the terror of Lee's great raid in Philadelphia or Grants seizure of Vicksburg thereby completing the blockade envisioned in Operation Anaconda. Often overlooked however is a brilliant campaign conducted by Union Maj. Gen William Rosecrans and his Army of the Cumberland, the Tullahoma campaign.

Named after a small town in Middle Tennessee, the Tullahoma campaign was launched on the 24th of June with the duel purpose of driving the Confederates out of the region and ultimately to threaten the strategic city of Chattanooga. Rosecrans had developed an ambitious and complicated plan requiring Maj. Gen Gordon Granger to march from Murfreesboro to Triune as to feign an attack from Shelbyville. Simultaneously, John Palmer's XXI Corp to Bradyville with the goal of advancing to Manchester from which he could strike at the enemy's rear. Once the Confederates we're focused on Shelbyville, Maj. Gen George H. Thomas would lead his Corps would march down the Manchester Pike and make for Hoover's Gap on the enemies right flank. This elaborate ploy was dependent on speed which was why Rosecrans had repeatedly requested more calvery reserves. This request had been denied though the army was permitted to outfit a Infantry brigade as a mounted unit.

Opposing the Union was the Army of Tennessee (formerly Mississippi) lead by General Braxton Bragg. The army was in a tough position, following their failed invasion of Kentucky culminating in a defeat at the Battle of Stone River, morale had cratered especially amount Bragg's staff who had already attempted to have Bragg removed from his position. This had resulted in President Davis dispatching Gen. Joseph E. Johnston. While Davis had fully expected Johnston to assume command, he refused feeling Bragg was keeping the army in good order as well as worrying that taking Bragg's command would damage his personal reputation. Davis then summoned Bragg to Richmond but the General stayed behind to tend to his sick wife. The end result was Bragg remaining at his post with a number of angered subordinates.

Between Rosecrans meticulous plan and the tense situation in the Confederate camp, it is not surprising that the Union forces emerged victorious though the sheer magnitude of their triumph is worthy of recognition. By July 3rd, Rosecrans had secured all his objectives at the lose of only 569 total casualties counting dead, injured and missing while capturing 1,643 rebels. President Lincoln said of the campaign that "the flanking of Bragg at Shelbyville, Tullahoma and Chattanooga is the most splendid piece of strategy I know of." Military historians agree that Rosecrans conducted a "brilliant" campaign.

Unfortunately for the General, his victory would initially be ignored in favor of the ANV's northern foraging. The Tullahoma campaign would receive respectable coverage after Lee retreated back to Virginia, Grant's victory at Vicksburg received the lion's share of the praise [1]. Secretary of War Stanton did send a message of congratulations but also questioned why Rosecrans had failed to pursue the retreating Confederates. It was speculated that Rosecrans felt slighted by the relative lack of acknowledgement and this encouraged his design of what would become known as the Chickamauga campaign.

The campaign got off to a strong start. On August 21 the Confederates were forced to abandon Chattanooga and retreat to northern Georgia. On the 10th of September Bragg sent two divisions to prevent Thomas' Corp from uniting with the main force but due to communication issues the two divisions arrived, and attacked, separately. When they joined together the following day, they refunded to attack and were themselves driven away.

The final battle of the campaign would begin in earnest on the 19th when Bragg ordered an assault on what he believed to be the Union's left flank but was actually the center of a wide front. Bragg would launch repeated attacks throughout the day but never adjusted his plans according to the Union's actual positioning. While the fighting on the 19th would ultimately prove inconclusive, the meetings called by the two commanders would prove much more decisive.

In the Union camp, retreat was quickly ruled out due to the presence of Assistant Secretary of War Charles A. Dance. Rosecrane decided that while the Army of the Cumberland would hold its position, it would do so defensively. He had chosen to place his faith in Bragg's history of retreat, convinced his rival could be made to repeat this behavior. In the early morning of the 20th would grant permission for troops to be moved to close a reported gap in his line. This particular order would have disasterous affect come the battle on the 20th.

In the Confederate camp, Bragg divide his army into two "wings" with James Longstreet, who brought 20,000[2] reinforcements from the Army of Northern Virginia, given command of the left and Lt Gen. Leonidas Polk who was given orders to assault the federal left flank at daybreak. Longstreet was likewise given orders and a map of the area.

The Confederate assault was supposed to begin at 5:00AM, it began at 9:30AM. In these four and a half hours the Union had built formidable defenses along their line. The first attack lead by Brigades under the command of John C. Breckenridge were naturally repelled with Brig Gen. Daniel W. Adams left wounded in the field. After a series of setbacks, the advance of the Confederate right wing had petered out, bringing an end to what would be called "...one of the most appalling exhibitions of command incompetence of the entire () war.[3]"

Here both commanding officers would issue orders based on incomplete evidence that would seal the fate of the battle. Rosecrans believing Brig Gen. John M. Brannan had moved his division to aide Thomas (he had agreed to but was awaiting approval) ordered Brig Gen. Thomas J. Wood to move his men to close the gap this would create. Wood was confused but went to fulfill his order. At about this time, Bragg, displeased with the lack of progress by the left wing, ordered all his commands to attack at once. Maj Gen. Alexander P. Stuart rushed to comply without consulting Longstreet and was repelled by the divisions of Brannan and Reynolds. Longstreet had likewise received the order but took time to arrange his forces before ordering, by sheer coincidence, an assault on the exact spot Wood's men were pulling out from. Though Brannan's men would mount a defense, it wasn't enough and they eventually had to fall back which began a route of the Union forces. Though there would be several more attacks and counterattacks, by 4:30PM the final Union divisions had either retreated or surrendered.

Throughout the night, the Army of the Cumberland would begin to fall back to Chattanooga. When the Confederates realized this, fresh discontent broke out among Bragg's officer Corp. Bragg was criticized for not closing off the Union's escape route and refused to pursue their weakend foe. Tension reached their apex when a cadre of officers signed a petition to President calling for Bragg's removal. Longstreet sent a personal message to Secretary of War James Seddon saying "nothing but the hand of God can save us or help us as long as we have our present commander." With the Army of Tennessee nearly in mutiny, Jefferson Davis personally visited the camp to hear the complaints in person.

What followed was a scene where Bragg sat red-faced while one subordinate after another rose to denounce him and his stewardship of the Army of Tennessee. Longstreet was particularly scathing saying that Bragg "was incompetent to manage an army or put men into a fight." and that he "knew nothing of the business." Enraged by this assault upon his character, Bragg offered the President his resignation. After giving the matter due thought, Davis announced that Bragg was being reassigned to Davis' chief military advisor with Longstreet being promoted to the new commander of the army due to his actions during the battle and his reputation as a subordinate to Lee[4]. The new commander of the Army of Tennessee was ordered by his Commander in Chief to "pursue the enemy with all the haste you and your men can muster"

1. OTL, Rosecrans was essentially ignored, drown out by the victories at Gettysburg and Vicksburg.
2.15,000 IRL. Lee can afford to send more TTL due to the success of his campaign.
3. A real quote by Steven E. Woodworth in his book "Six Armies in Tennessee"
4. IRL Davis allowed Brag to stay in command until February 1864 when Davis made him Chief advisor. Here he gets to work with Davis a little early.
 
Just wanted to let you know I'm working on the next chapter. I had a draft underway but it got deleted (even though I'm certain I pressed "save draft"). Still I intend to start over and shall post as soon as it's finished.
 
Just wanted to let you know I'm working on the next chapter. I had a draft underway but it got deleted (even though I'm certain I pressed "save draft"). Still I intend to start over and shall post as soon as it's finished.
Sometimes its like that with the site. But hey, progress is progress. I'm liking the writing, keep at it.
 
The Union regroups.
The first thing Gen. Longstreet did after assuming command of the Army of Tennessee was to assess the damage to his forces. The battle of Chickamauga had inflicted heavy casualties including four thousand killed, sixteen thousand wounded and over seventeen hundred captured or missing[1]. This left him with over forty-one thousand men in fighting shape. Determining this force was strong enough to engage the weakened Army of the Cumberland, the Confederates began their pursuit on September 21.

The Union army they were chasing was in utter disarray. The men were tired, hungry and low on ammunition. None took the defeat as hard as Rosecrans himself. Despite the efforts of his fellow officers and even President Lincoln himself, Rosecrans couldn't be roused to action, causing Lincoln to tell his secretary John Hay the general seemed "confused and stunned like a duck hit on the head."[1].

Thankfully for the Union, others were still willing to take action. Before battle had even broken out at Chickamauga, Maj. Gen Grant haven been ordered to send his available forces to assist Rosecrans, placed them under the command of his chief subordinate Maj. Gen William Sherman. Mere hours after the defeat, War Secretary Stanton would order Maj. Gen Hooker to Chattanooga with 20,000 men from the Army of the Potomac. Stanton would later order Grant himself to Chattanooga to command the newly created Military Division of the Mississippi stretching from the Mississippi river to the Appalachian mountains. His first act was to replace Rosecrans with Maj. Gen George H. Thomas famed as the "Rock of Chickamauga" for his resolute stand at Snodgrass Hill.

Hearing an inaccurate report that Rosecrans had been planning to abandon the city, Grant sent a telegraph to his new commander saying "Hold Chattanooga at all hazards. I will be there as soon as possible." to which Thomas immediately responded "I will hold the town till we starve". Thomas' first act was to approve a plan by the Army of the Cumberland's chief engineer Brig. Gen William F. "Baldy" Smith. This plan called for the Union to seize Brown's Ferry which crossed the Tennessee river and then join up with Hooker's forces coming from Bridgeport, Alabama thus creating a reliable and sufficient supply line.

Hooker then sent Maj. Gen Henry W. Slocum with one of his divisions to guard the railroad from Murfreesboro to Bridgeport while Brig. Gen John W. Geary took Slocum's other two and linked up with Maj Gen. Oliver O. Howard's divisions to march on Lookout Valley. Poor weather halted their advance however causing Grant to move up the seizure of Brown's Ferry. And it was this decision that would lead to the first fighting of the Chattanooga campaign.


1. A OTL quote.

Authors note: I LIIIIVVVVVEEEEEE!!!!

But seriously, thank you for your patience. This was originally part of a larger chapter but i decided to split it so i could get this out. Next chapter will cover the Battle of Wauhatchie and perhaps a bit extra. Also a question for military historians, Now that Longstreet is in command of the entire army, who now holds Longstreet's former command?
 
who now holds Longstreet's former command?
Assuming he retains Bragg's wing formations, the senior officer within his wing would be Major General Thomas C. Hindman. Knowing Longstreet, however, he would probably try to push for Hood taking command of the wing and Micah Jenkins taking command of Hood's corps. Of course, if he really wanted to avoid controversy Hardee could always be returned to the Army of Tennessee, given the wing, and no one would complain.
 
Assuming he retains Bragg's wing formations, the senior officer within his wing would be Major General Thomas C. Hindman. Knowing Longstreet, however, he would probably try to push for Hood taking command of the wing and Micah Jenkins taking command of Hood's corps. Of course, if he really wanted to avoid controversy Hardee could always be returned to the Army of Tennessee, given the wing, and no one would complain.
Appreciate the suggestions.
 
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