I need to translate some phrases into Latin

Discussion in 'Help and Rules' started by Petike, Dec 9, 2011.

  1. Petike Sky Pirate Extraordinaire Kicked

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    Does anyone have a good knowledge of Latin grammar and want to help ?

    Nothing complicated, just generic mottos. For starters :

    "Fortune favours the brave."

    and

    "I win wars without weapons." or "I fight / (wage) war without weapons."


    Also, something a bit more complex :

    "Swiftly attacking from the mists."
     
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  2. fortyseven Mastermind

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    From wiki: "Fortes fortuna adiuvat" (or "Fortuna audaces iuvat").

    I'd ask P for the others.
     
  3. Petike Sky Pirate Extraordinaire Kicked

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    Thanks. Go ahead and ask him. :D
     
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  4. My Username is Inigo Montoya Virile Member

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    1) Already answered
    2) Bellum sine arma gero.
    3) Nubibus rapide attingens/attingendus*.
    * Here in the masculine nominative singular. Should agree with the word it complementizes. Attingens is the regular present participle, while attingendus is a gerund. Both translate to "attacking" in English.
     
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  5. Petike Sky Pirate Extraordinaire Kicked

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    Great ! Thank you ! :cool:
     
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  6. Wolfpaw Banned

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    I'm bumping this because I need some stuff translated into Latin and I wouldn't want to clutter the Board.

    Could anybody please translate: "In the Footprints of the Monkey" / "The Monkey's Footprints"

    Should it be something like "In vestigia simia" or "Vestigia Simiae" or what?
     
  7. Codae Well-Known Member

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    In the footprints of the monkey: In vestigia simiae
    The monkey's footprints: Vestigia simiae
     
  8. Klisz IRCmaster

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    In vestigiis simiae, rather; because of the "in", it should be in the ablative.
     
  9. Codae Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for that. I shouldn't have blindly used the accusative.
     
  10. Wolfpaw Banned

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    Thanks a bunch, guys :)
     
  11. Gregg Clunch tier

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    My own question about Latin:

    There's a Latin suffix (-ulus, -ulum, -ula) to modify a noun to make it small: caligula (little boots), calculus (little stone), homunculus (little man), etc.

    If there a similar suffix to modify nouns to make them big - so one might have a word for big boots, big stone, big man, etc?
     
  12. Wolfpaw Banned

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    IIRC, the Latin superlative formula is basically "double consonant + -im- + case ending"
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2013
  13. Petike Sky Pirate Extraordinaire Kicked

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    I hereby give my official approval for this to become a core thread for Latin translations related advice. Good idea, Wolfpaw !
     
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  14. Gregg Clunch tier

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    Thanks, but the superlative form would give me "bootiest" rather than "big boot", I think. I've taken the advantage of Sunday to dig around and remind myself it's the augmentative form I want - and a little googling informs me that Latin has no standard augmentative form. There are some instances, usually involving an -o or -io suffix ("capito" for big head), but sadly these seem to be specific coinages without a standard way of applying them.