How useful would a SS.10 anti-tank missile have been for Germany during WW2?

This question stems from a similar thread regarding ATGMs stopping Soviet armored columns/breakthroughs and curtaining any offensive capabilities, as such, could the same thing apply to Germany in this case?

I think the introduction of the SS.10, or an analogue in 1942/43 would greatly impact the ground campaign on the Eastern Front, but I am unsure if the same could be said about the other theaters of war. And I believe this impact is justified as the SS.10 would not fit any previous anti-tank category, like the Panzerfaust, which while cheap and effective had a short combat range of ~60 meters or PaK 40 to PaK 43, which were heavy, required motorized transport, had a sizable crew and were costly.

The SS.10, in theory, should have a similar if not better long range performance of the PaK 40 but with the (relative) cheapness of the Panzerfaust. However, and this is the crux of the problem, could such a weapon, grind the Soviet offensive to a stop? Or perhaps the problem would be, how many missiles do you need to achieve a stalemate? 20,000? 30,000? 100,000? 300,000? And so on.

(I chose the SS.10 because it has a link to the X-7. And for the sake of the question, assume that Germany, like on rare occasions rolled a few sixes to get it deployed in either 1942 or 43.)
 
I think the Japanese would have benefited even more than the Germans from such a device. Their weaker industrial capacity could have produced anti tank missiles on a far greater scale than tanks or artillery pieces, and these weapons would have been devastating in the jungles of the Pacific and Indo-China.
 
I think the Japanese would have benefited even more than the Germans from such a device. Their weaker industrial capacity could have produced anti tank missiles on a far greater scale than tanks or artillery pieces, and these weapons would have been devastating in the jungles of the Pacific and Indo-China.
Disagree. Their electronics industry was perhaps weaker than their heavy industry, which is critical for ATGMs (although it probably would have been bottlenecked by shortages of different materials). The other thing to remember is that early ATGMs were all wire-guided, and tended to break their wires and miss if there were too many trees around. Like in a jungle, say...
 
Top