Henry Tudor, Heretic and Father of Kings

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: Before 1900' started by Cate13, Nov 4, 2018.

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  1. JuliantheUnknown Unknown Member

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    Jun 11, 2016
    Man, I feel sorry for Henry Tudor in this TL. All of his siblings are dead - he just feels like one of those old men whose time and youth is so far behind them that the world looked completely different from the present.
     
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  2. Helmuth von Moltke Well-Known Member

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    Dec 19, 2017
    But he is substantially better off than Henry IOTL, as he not only gets to live longer, he also doesn't suffer from gout, boils, extreme obesity, or guilt from executing two of his wives, and has a large and loving family.
     
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  3. JuliantheUnknown Unknown Member

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    Jun 11, 2016
    I can separate the two Henrys. It's still sad to being the last of your siblings alive, still sad to see your world gone.
     
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  4. Threadmarks: Section Seventy

    Cate13 Well-Known Member

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  5. Threadmarks: Section Seventy-One - 1572

    Cate13 Well-Known Member

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    Oct 25, 2016
    “It was during Prince Henry’s last visit to Navarre that Prince Christian, son of Prince Henry and Princess Christina, would die. The twenty-year-old prince had been fond seeking peace and quiet by abandoning his companions to ride out by himself. Then one day his horse came back without a rider. Search parties were sent out. Prince Christian’s body was found four days later.

    Modern forensic anthropologies now believe that Prince Christian was simply thrown from his horse and down a ravine where, with a broken leg, he was unable to seek help. But, at the time, Prince Christian’s death was seen as foul play. Several different people were arrested and probably would have been executed but for Princess Christina being found dead in her rooms with her journal.

    The last journal entry was almost completely unintelligible: full of nonsense and mad ramblings, but the theme of culpability and guilt was prevalent throughout. The general consensus was that Princess Christina had somehow arranged for the death of her son and then killed herself out of guilt.

    In all likelihood, Princess Christina accidently overdosed on laudanum. The few records the Navarrese Court doctor kept indicate that Princess Christian had been taking it in greater and greater amounts since the death of Prince Antoine.”
    Ephraim Pollock, “Henry and Christina, They May Have Tried to Kill Each Other”​


    “The dual death of his only son and wife would cause Prince Henri, son of King Henri III, to retreat from court to one of the more secluded properties of the crown of Navarre. This would leave King Henri III and his father Prince Henry alone to handle the ensuing crisis. Almost as if fifty years hadn’t passed, the two fell back into the pattern of King Henri’s regency; in tandem the two would work together to calm and quiet Navarre during this precarious time. [1]

    The next few years would generally be regarded as some of the best of King Henri’s reign.”
    Patrick Wendal, “The First Navarrese Tudor King”​

    [1] Though it must be acknowledged that Prince Henry was less assistance than he was fifty years earlier with very few nobles that remember the regency left alive.


    “Just as Niccolò Machiavelli’s The Prince was inspired by Cesare Borgia, Julian Jakes’ The King was inspired by King Henri III. The Navarrese born, Italian raised, philosopher would rocket to fame after the publication. The treatise specifically addresses Machiavelli’s points and seeks to discount them, citing King Henri and his handling of the death of Princess Christina and Prince Christian.”
    William Richards, “Italy and the Awakening”​
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2019
  6. FalconHonour Well-Known Member

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    Nov 16, 2018
    Why does this chapter feel familiar to me. I feel like I have read it before...
     
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  7. Threadmarks: Section Seventy-Two - 1572

    Cate13 Well-Known Member

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    Oct 25, 2016
    “The death of Prince Christian, grandson of King Henri III, would leave the inheritance a little shakier than it had been before. The only living child of Prince Henri was thirteen-year-old Anne Tudor. There were several prominent nobles that would have preferred for her to disinherited in favor of her uncle Prince Francis Tudor.

    But, Prince Francis and Marie Francoise of Brittany, continuing in their pattern of avoiding conflict where possible, put their support behind Princess Anne being left in the succession.”
    Solomon Lee, “Marie Francoise and Francis Tudor”​


    “To reinforce Princess Anne’s claim, she was betrothed to René de Lorraine, the grandson of Magdalena d’Albret, the elder half-sister of King Henri III. [2] The two wouldn’t actually marry until Princess Anne reached the age of fifteen.”
    Tammie Waltherson, “For the Tudors’ It’s All About Family”​

    [2] Princess Magdalena d’Albret, was the eldest surviving daughter of Catherine of Navarre would marry Jean de Lorraine. Their son, Jean Gaston de Lorraine, Lord of Albret and Count of Castres would marry Renée of Guise. Their only son was René de Lorraine.


    “After almost a year, a full four months longer than planned, Prince Henry and his party would leave Navarre, heading towards Hesse-Kassel to visit Margaret Tudor, the mother of William Henry, Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel.”
    Irene Whent, “Prince Henry’s Last Trip”​


    “Landgravine Margaret Tudor was the second child from Prince Henry’s marriage to the Lady Mary Howard. Landgravine Margaret would grow quite close to her father’s next wife, her step-mother, Renee of France. In fact, Landgravine Margaret’s second daughter would be named for Princes Renee; Renata being the German form.

    Landgravine Margaret Tudor had married William IV, Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel, early in fifteen sixty-two, at age eighteen. The two shared a love of the heavens and stars that would propel Hesse-Kassel into the forefront of astronomical study and discovery. Even after the death of William IV, Landgravine Margaret would continue funding and sponsoring astronomical research.”
    Clara Bently, “Margaret and the Heavens” ​
     
  8. Darth_Kiryan The Númenorean Sith

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    AUS
    Damn, Henry is pushing 81, or so.

    He is doing pretty well for a man his age.
     
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  9. JuliantheUnknown Unknown Member

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    Jun 11, 2016
    I know. I love it. I love this idea of really old people in stories who can look back at the world and see how much it's changed.
     
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  10. Cate13 Well-Known Member

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    Oct 25, 2016
    Thanks for the comment! I hope that Henry's mobility at this age isn't pushing boundaries of believability.

    Thanks for the comment! I find I really like writing older characters, so I'm glad you like it. :D
     
  11. FalconHonour Well-Known Member

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    Nov 16, 2018
    Hey, if Eleanor of Aquitaine can cross the Pyreenes in her seventies three hundred years earlier, Henry should be fine. Though if he survives much longer you are going to be pushing it...
     
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  12. Cate13 Well-Known Member

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    Oct 25, 2016
    Don't worry the clock is ticking for Prince Henry.
     
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  13. kasumigenx Well-Known Member

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    May 26, 2009
    It is good that Henry VIII never married the Hunchbacked Dwarf Anne of Navarre...
     
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  14. kaiidth Well-Known Member

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    Germany
    This TL is so thoroughly detailed, i am really awed.
     
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  15. Cate13 Well-Known Member

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    Oct 25, 2016
    Thank you for saying so!! That is super nice! I'm glad you like the details.
     
  16. Threadmarks: Section Seventy-Three - 1572

    Cate13 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2016
    “Prince Henry would arrive in Hesse-Kassel only several months before Tycho Brache. The famed astronomer hadn’t intended to stay long in Hesse-Kassel; he only wished to see the observatory that William IV had built. But with dwindling support from King John Albert of Denmark and Norway, and the offer of patronage from William Henry, Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel, [2] Tycho Brache would remain in Kassel.

    He would move his family to Hesse-Kassel several months after the end of Prince Henry’s visit.”
    Clara Bently, “Margaret and the Heavens”​

    [2] Though in truth the offer was probably the notion of Dowager Landgravine Margaret.


    StarCrossedis about what you’d expect: drama filled, campy, and historically inaccurate. I almost strained my eyes rolling them so hard. After I was done being baffled I got mad. Tycho Brache and Landgravine Margaret Tudor (Prince Henry’s daughter, it’s hard to keep Tudors straight, I know) did not have some sort of Romeo and Juliet love affair!

    For one, Tycho Brache was happily married (he and his wife would have, like twelve kids) and two, anytime Landgravine Margaret Tudor and Tycho Brache were in the same room they apparently spent the entire time nerding out about the stars! No romance! Is it really so hard to believe two people can be close without it becoming romantic?!?!?

    But, credit where credit is due, the costuming was amazing! Completely accurate. Alyssa Milano, as Margaret Tudor, was dressed in the English fashions Margaret must have brought with her from England. This kept Milano distinct in every frame. And everyone, down to the extras, was dressed period typical. It was amazing!

    But, it did not make up for the aweful plot. I almost felt like a friend of mine was being slandered! Margaret Tudor should be remembered for the advances to astronomy she made personally and the advances she financed and for the amazing job she did as regent for her young son. Not, this b-movie drama plot.”
    Review by Hailey Lane, the definitive Tudor Reviewer​


    “Prince Henry seemed to be aware that he would never again be able to return to Hesse-Kassel. He spent the majority of his time with his daughter and grandchildren, eschewing most parties and other engagements. This was particularly unusual, as Prince Henry had always loved the spotlight.”
    Irene Whent, “Prince Henry’s Last Trip”​
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2019
  17. Threadmarks: Section Seventy-Four - 1572

    Cate13 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2016
    A.N. It's alive!! Sorry about going AWOL. College has been a lot.


    “Lord Edmund Tudor, youngest son of Prince Henry, would be just ten years old when he left England with his father for Prince Henry’s last trip. This journey would introduce Lord Edmund to several older siblings he had never met, give the young man a breadth of experience unusual for his age, and a bevy of connections that rivaled Prince Henry’s. For, throughout the journey, Lord Edmund would make a lot of friends.

    Among the most prevalent would be his grandnephew Henri Tudor, son of Francis Tudor and Marie Francoise of Brittany; Julian Jakes, the Navarrese-Italian philosopher; his distance cousin Louise Stuart, the bastard daughter of the King of France; Lorenz Mul, the great playwright; Pierre Charron, theologian and philosopher; and Irmele Schade, the portrait painter. [1]

    Lord Edmund Tudor shared his father’s charisma and the unique ability—for the Tudors—to allow another to take center stage. This would endear him to the many important people.”
    Harper Wayne, “Keeping Up with The Tudors, Your Guide to Who’s Who”​

    [1] Schade is primarily known for her portraits of the Tudor Family. The project would start late in 1589 and encompass the living children of Prince Henry Tudor and their descendants. It would take thirty years.


    “Hansen: Not everyone is a familiar with the Tudors as I am, but even those who don’t religiously study the 1500s and all the **** the Tudors got up to, will reference Tudor’s all the time. They just don’t know it.

    Lawless: Like calling red hair Tudor hair?

    Hansen: Yep, or, you know the phrase, ‘Edmund knows them’?

    Lawless: I have heard it a time or two.

    Hansen: It means a person worth knowing. It’s because way back when, if there was anyone worth knowing, Edmund Tudor knew them. It came into popularity at the end of the FitzTudors, when everyone was Tudor crazy.”
    Selection from interview with Henry Hansen, author of Tudors, Wettins, and FitzTudors: The Last Three Dynasties of England


    “While the relationship of Prince Henry with his youngest son Edmund would never compare with his relationship his eldest son Henri, it is undoubtedly one the stronger relationships of Prince Henry’s life.

    And old man when Edmund Tudor was born, Prince Henry had outlived all his siblings, most of his generation, and several of his children. He was intimately aware of the fragility of life. It appears to be for this reason that Prince Henry insisted that young Edmund Tudor accompanied Prince Henry on his last trip. Prince Henry knew that he was running out of time and wanted his youngest son by his side.”
    Rachel Rowell, “Father of the Reawakening, and a Good Father”​
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2019
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  18. JuliantheUnknown Unknown Member

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    Jun 11, 2016
    Hmmm - interesting.
     
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  19. FalconHonour Well-Known Member

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    Nov 16, 2018
    Oh dear... The monarchist in me does not like the sound of that...
     
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  20. BlueFlowwer Well-Known Member

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    Feb 12, 2017
    *rubs hands together* oh, this is gonna become a glorious shitstorm....
     
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