Help me determine the climate zones of this landmass I've created in the North Atlantic...

This is the micro-continent of Antillia, part of a wider altgeo universe which include other Macronesian islands....

Antilla_Basic.png


Latitude-wise Antillia, including it's offshore islands reach from roughly 50'N at it's northernmost tip to 25'N in the far south. It has a spine of large mountains along it's length, the Corvos Mountains, as well as along the centre, the Azorean Mountains. Bother were the result of volcanic activity and uplift from the drift of Antillia away from Iberia after 50mya.

My conception of the climate of Antillia is that it has a mild and wet climate overall, moderated by the Atlantic, gradated as more temperate in the north and more sub-tropical in the south with montane habitats in elevated regions. Any ideas to contribute from you guys though? What would the ocean current around Antillia be like based on current models in the North Atlantic? What effects would these have on Antillia's climate?
 

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I know that Artifexian can give you a pretty good understanding of climates, but in this specific scenario I wonder how much the Gulf Stream would influence it and how the lack of a direct stream would influence Europe.
 
I know that Artifexian can give you a pretty good understanding of climates, but in this specific scenario I wonder how much the Gulf Stream would influence it and how the lack of a direct stream would influence Europe.
I thought this would come up. The Gulf Stream would not shut down nor would it be blocked entirely, it would simply shift to the North. I predict the climate effect on Europe would be rather small. Other factors are at place like a large expanse of water to the north of Europe which will still have a relatively wide opening to the warmer waters of the Caribbean.
For Antillia, I suspect the West Coast would have the mildest and wettest climate, especially further northward. The Southern tip might actually be quite dry I'm not too sure just yet. The East Coast would have nearby ocean gyres which would facilitate it's own micro-climates developing. The East would still be green and verdant, I hope most of Antillia is.
 
After watching Artifexian's videos I can define five main climate zones of Antillia:
1) Northeastern - A Temperate Oceanic climate.
2) Central Eastern - A Mediterranean-type climate, opposite Iberia.
3) Central Coastal Lowland - A Humid Subtropical climate occupying a broad swathe of the West Coast and lowlands of Central and Southeastern Antillia.
4) Southernmost Peninsula - A Tropical Savanna climate.
5) Mountain Interior - An Alpine climate at higher elevation with some Subtropical influences.
 
I would re-name that to Atlantis, personally. Fits the spot described for them perfectly.
True though I very closely fits the Antillia myth also and Antillia was a reputed 'phantom island' believed to have existed opposite Portugal up till the 15th century. The native name of the landmass given by the indigenous people I envisage there is Achinet. They are a Guanche Berber influenced society.
 
I would re-name that to Atlantis, personally. Fits the spot described for them perfectly.
I see why one might, but Atlantis is a bit cliche. It depends on whether the Atlantis story is prominent ITTL. For example how human settlement of Antillia affects Europe (as people seem to have already determined that climatic impact on Europe will be limited/minimal), particularly the ancient Greeks, could make or break the idea of the continent as "Atlantis".
 
I see why one might, but Atlantis is a bit cliche. It depends on whether the Atlantis story is prominent ITTL. For example how human settlement of Antillia affects Europe (as people seem to have already determined that climatic impact on Europe will be limited/minimal), particularly the ancient Greeks, could make or break the idea of the continent as "Atlantis".
Settlement of Antillia would occur between 3000-2500 BP (So 1000-500 BCE) and would be fuelled by Phoenician efforts though a large proportion of the settlers would be drawn from Atlantic Coast populations of Berber and Paleo-Iberians. The Greeks would know of it and it could be known as Atlantis during Antiquity by Greeks and Romans but during the Middle Ages, the Iberian term Antillia would become the main exonym.

Follow the era of colonisation and entrenchment of a common culture as well as the fall of Carthage in 180 BCE, Antillia/Achinet would become a fully autonomous, independent civilisation and I would have it resist attempts at outside subjugation until at least the 15th century. It would technically be Europe's first post-colonial state! :D
 
I'm not a climatologist, but I can agree with the other posters that the overall climate for Antillia should be excellent for human settlement.

Assuming it's empty ( which would be very hard to believe), it's prime real estate for the western powers.

I can see Portugal, Spain, France, and Britain all fighting over this continent when the Age of Exploration starts. Portugal has the lead but British or French manpower could make up for the slow start. Whoever manages to bag the whole island would have a giant wall to ward off competitors to the New world so I see many wars in the horizon.
 
Like I said it wouldn't be empty after 2500 BP at least and have a divergent culture from Europe and Nirth Africa developed over 2000 years until the Portuguese establish their first outposts in the 1400s.
I actually think conquest by Europeans would be off to a slow start due to Portugal's low manpower and Antillian terrain. Much of the European squabbling would be at each others expense due to trade and religious rivalries.
The Antillians would hole themselves up in the Highlands and pick sides, acquire technologies and gain favour. It's possible they reform sufficiently into a modern state, diplomatically neutral pending British suzereinity I think...
 
Like I said it wouldn't be empty after 2500 BP at least and have a divergent culture from Europe and Nirth Africa developed over 2000 years until the Portuguese establish their first outposts in the 1400s.
I actually think conquest by Europeans would be off to a slow start due to Portugal's low manpower and Antillian terrain. Much of the European squabbling would be at each others expense due to trade and religious rivalries.
The Antillians would hole themselves up in the Highlands and pick sides, acquire technologies and gain favour. It's possible they reform sufficiently into a modern state, diplomatically neutral pending British suzereinity I think...
What do you use to make these maps by the way?
 
Settlement of Antillia would occur between 3000-2500 BP (So 1000-500 BCE) and would be fuelled by Phoenician efforts though a large proportion of the settlers would be drawn from Atlantic Coast populations of Berber and Paleo-Iberians. The Greeks would know of it and it could be known as Atlantis during Antiquity by Greeks and Romans but during the Middle Ages, the Iberian term Antillia would become the main exonym.

Follow the era of colonisation and entrenchment of a common culture as well as the fall of Carthage in 180 BCE, Antillia/Achinet would become a fully autonomous, independent civilisation and I would have it resist attempts at outside subjugation until at least the 15th century. It would technically be Europe's first post-colonial state! :D
Did Europe know about Antillia before the 1400s?
 
Did Europe know about Antillia before the 1400s?
Yes they would have been nominally informed of it, perhaps continuously from colonisation. However power projection out there would a challenge until the Age of Exploration anyway. A trickle of trade goods and ideas would reach Antillia from the Old World to keep them from falling to far behind. They would have they're own distinct civilisation though.
 
Yes they would have been nominally informed of it, perhaps continuously from colonisation. However power projection out there would a challenge until the Age of Exploration anyway. A trickle of trade goods and ideas would reach Antillia from the Old World to keep them from falling to far behind. They would have they're own distinct civilisation though.
Would they have converted to Christianity ( or Islam for that matter), or would they've still been pagan?
 
Would they have converted to Christianity ( or Islam for that matter), or would they've still been pagan?
Their pagan belief system would evolve over time and reform into a syncretic religion influenced by Catholicism but with a Mother Goddess - Chaxiraxi, and a variable pantheon of other deities and spirits. There would probably still be sizable Christian minorities in Antillia though, both Protestant and Catholic. Paganism there held out long enough to resist missionary pressure though and benefit from a romantic revival from the 1700s onward. Hope that plays well...
 
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