Hail, Britannia

Discussion in 'Alternate History Maps and Graphics' started by LeinadB93, Jul 30, 2017.

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  1. LeinadB93 Just Leinad

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    Thanks :) It's good to be back.

    Neither - the American colonial government under Andrew Jackson ordered the removal, supported by the governments of the affected provinces/colonies, but Westminster kind of turned a blind eye until Tecumseh himself came to speak before Parliament in 1834. The imperial government would pressure Jackson to resign shortly after.
     
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  2. Tyche Hand of Providence

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    Uhhh, It looks like that province's borders are actually the source of the Arkansas River on the south and just follow a vertical line to the 42nd parallel north, seems to be identical to the OTL Adams-Onís Treaty boundary that defines the TTL border between the UKE, California, and Texas. The source of the Colorado River does lie within the provincial boundaries, so it would still be perfectly plausible for it to be named Colorado!
     
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  3. LeinadB93 Just Leinad

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    Whoops... Got my rivers confused... Sorry about that!

    You are quite correct, that the source of the Colorado River lies within the province, but the borders are the Arkansaw River then a line northwards to the 42nd parallel. It is meant to be identical to the OTL Adams-Onís Treaty, which defines the border between British America, and California and Texas.

    My bad :)
     
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  4. Threadmarks: Cape Breton Island; 2016 legislative election

    LeinadB93 Just Leinad

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    And now to get back in the swing of things, a look at one of New England's provinces that doesn't exist IOTL (and is significantly different than it's OTL territory anyway):

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    Cape Breton Island (Gaelic: Eilean Cheap Breatainn), commonly known as Cape Breton (Gaelic: Ceap Breatainn), is an island province in northeastern New England, off the coast of Nova Scotia between the Gulf of St. Lawrence and the Atlantic Ocean, southwest of the Dominion of Newfoundland across the Cabot Strait. Cape Breton Island is the least populous of the country's ten provinces and one of two New England provinces where the Gaelic language is spoken by a majority of the population. The island is the third-smallest New England province by population, connected to the Nova Scotia peninsula by the Canso Bridge, and is dominated by one of the world's larger salt water lakes, Bras d'Or.

    Reportedly visisted by English explorer John Cabot in 1497, the island had been inhabited by Native Americans for several thousand years who survived by hunting and fishing due to the unfavourable agricultural conditions. The local Mi'kmaq peoples traded with European fishermen in the early 16th century, and although the Portuguese attempted to establish a fishing colony on the island in 1520s, most traders were seasonal and did not maintain permanent settlements. Scottish triumphs in the 1620s led to the plantation of a colony at what is now Baleine, marking the first time the island was claimed by a European power, although the territory was ceded to France in 1632. The French named the island Île Royale, and established the first European settlements on the island, although these were abandoned by 1660, and the island had no European settlers until the establishment of Louisbourg in 1713 when the French relocated from Newfoundland and the Acadian mainland to the island and strengthened the fortifications at Louisbourg. Between 1713 and 1763, the French colony included Île Saint-Jean, today called Prince Edward Island, and was captured twice by the British, first in 1745 and again in 1758, although the islands remained formally part of New France.

    In 1763, the Treaty of Paris ceded the island to Great Britain at the end of the Seven Years' War, and the colony was merged with the adjacent British colony of Nova Scotia, which expanded to cover present day Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island and New Brunswick. Acadians who had been expelled from the mainland were permitted to settle on the island from 1764, and some of the first British-sanctioned settlers on the island were Irish and Scottish Gaelic. The latter, forced from Scotland due to the Highland Clearances, brought with them a common culture of poetry, traditional songs and tales, music and dance, and used this to develop distinctive local traditions. Gaelic settlement in Cape Breton brought the Gaelic language to the island, which was reinforced as the predominant language of the province in the first half of the 19th century. Cape Breton was administered as part of Nova Scotia until 1794 when it was separated as its own province with home rule and its capital at Sydney. Large-scale shipbuilding began on the island in the 1790s, becoming an important part of the province's economy until the mid-19th century.

    On 1 October 1866, the colony of Cape Breton Island joined with the other nine provinces to form the Commonwealth of New England. This led to the industrial development of the island's resources, particularly the coal fields, as well as a boom in the fishing industry. Sydney became a large port, due to its large and sheltered natural harbour, and the province's largest commercial centre, whilst neighbouring settlements became home to naval bases and communication centres, both of which were important during the early-20th century. The coal mining heritage of parts of the island is evident with a strong union tradition, stemming for the severe labour disputes and strike action of the 1920s. Since the 1950s, tourism has become an important part of the island's economy, recognising the unique culture of the province and its mixture of native, French and Gaelic heritage and traditions.

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    The 2016 Cape Breton Island legislative election was held on 4 May 2016 to elect, under the single transferable vote system, the 24 members of the Legislative Assembly in the island's eight constituencies, each of which elects 3 members of the legislature.

    The broad-centrist Gàidhlig Caidreachas (Gaelic Alliance) government, led by Premier Rodney MacDhòmhnaill, which espouses Cape Breton regionalist and social democratic policies, secured their third consecutive mandate, although they were reduced to a minority in the legislature, a fact attributed to voter fatigue. The GC had been in office since 2008, and became the first Cape Breton government since the 1950s to win a third term in office. The opposition centre-left Liberal Democrats, formed in the 1990s by a merged between the provincial Liberals, Social Democrats and Progressives, under new leader Tammy Mártain, held all their seats but failed to make inroads against the Gaelic Alliance and saw only a slight change in their share of the popular vote. The centre-right Conservatives, historically a major party in Cape Breton, saw their decline reversed slightly at this election, picking up an additional seat in Sydney River-Mira-Louisbourg.

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    Last edited: Oct 7, 2019
  5. Israel_Dan the Man Well-Known Member

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    Hey just a question (good to have you back btw), but do you know what the next country will be? I'm just curious. As an Israeli, the Levant fascinates me.
     
  6. LeinadB93 Just Leinad

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    Thnaks :)

    Probably either the Vietnamese countries, Iran, Spain or Argentina. They are the ones with completed wikiboxes just awaiting write up.
     
  7. anycent King of Rock and Roll

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    hey its me anycent check your dms about our concersation
     
  8. Threadmarks: Prince Edward Island; 2017 legislative election

    LeinadB93 Just Leinad

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    All in good time. I've kind of not had the time (or the inclination) to focus on popular culture...

    The Levant still needs a lot of fleshing out TBH... Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    Anyway, here's the next part of New England - the Garden of the Gulf:

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    Prince Edward Island is an island province in northeastern New England, off the northern coast of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, west of Cape Breton Island and separated from the mainland by the Northumberland Strait. It is the second smallest province by area, connected to the mainland by the Northumberland Bridge. Prince Edward Island is the second smallest province by population, with 40% of the inhabitants speaking Gaelic as their first language.

    Inhabited for millenia by the Mi'kmaq First nations, who called the island Epekwitk, the island was first sighted by Jacques Cartier in 1534 and claimed by France as part of their colony of Acadia in 1604, who named the island Île Saint-Jean. The Mi'kmaq never recognised French claims, or ceded territory to them, but welcomed them as trading partners and allies. A series of conflicts between France and Great Britain during the 18th century regularly spread to the island, which was repeatedly occupied by the British and returned to the French in 1748. Following the loss of mainland Acadia, nearly 5,000 Acadian refugees resettled on the island during the exodus and British-ordered expulsions in the 1740s and 1750s.

    During the Seven Years' War, the French forces in Acadia were defeated at the siege of Louisbourg on Cape Breton and in 1758 British forces launched a military campaign to seize the island. The occupying force ordered the eviction and deportation of most Acadians, with many dying in the expulsion. France formally ceded the island, and most of New France, to the British in the 1763 Treaty of Paris. Renamed St. John's Island by the British, the new possession was originally administered as part of the neighbouring colony of Nova Scotia until 1769 when the island became a separate crown colony. Various disputes between settlers and absentee landlords slowed the development of the island, although the late 1700s saw an influx of settlers from the southern American colonies and the Scottish Highlands, the latter leading to a high proportion of Gaelic speakers that has survived to this day.

    In 1791 the colony was granted formal home rule, and in 1798 the British government approved the change of the colony's name from St. John's Island to Prince Edward Island, in honour of the fourth son of King-Emperor George III. In September 1864, Prince Edward Island hosted the Charlottetown Conference, which was the first meeting in the process leading to the creation of the Commonwealth of New England on 1 October 1866. Since the creation of the dominion, Prince Edward Island has seen much industrial development, whilst maintaining its distinct culture. Agriculture remains the dominant industry, along with fishing and tourism, and although the island has minimal heavy industry and manufacturing the aerospace and energy industries have seen much growth and diversification. Prince Edward Island is also a major centre of the drive for a reduction in the environmental of human activities.

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    The 2017 Prince Edward Island legislative election was held on 19 April 2017 to elect, under the instant runoff voting system, the 27 members of the Legislative Assembly.

    The incumbent centre-left Progressive Democrats, led by Premier Michael Redmond, suffered a disastrous election result, losing ten seats and being forced into opposition. The minor left-wing ecological Greens, led by long time leader Sharon Labchuk, outperformed all expectations, securing 12 additional seats and forming a majority government, becoming the first green party elected to a majority government and with Labchuk became the first green party premier in Britain. The centre-right United Conservatives, formally the main opposition party on the island, were reduced to the third party in the legislature.

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  9. anycent King of Rock and Roll

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    Beautiful
     
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  10. Israel_Dan the Man Well-Known Member

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    Jun 29, 2017
    What do you need help with on the Levant? As an Israeli, I’m sure I can help you out at least a bit depending on what you need help with. Also, beautiful update, magnificent as usual.
     
  11. Nazi Space Spy Well-Known Member

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    Dude.
     
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  12. Arthur Marston Well-Known Member

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    Speaking of Argentina, did they ever try to claim the Falklands at any point, or did the Empire's strength deter them?
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2019
  13. Turquoise Blue Floraison Tibby!

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    Why would they? They don't have land close to it. And to be honest, they border a British dominion and the superpower that Britain more or less made, so they obviously wouldn't want to poke the British lion.
     
  14. LeinadB93 Just Leinad

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    I suppose some political figures from the various denominations - OTL Lebanon, Christians, Jews, Palestinians. But also a general sense of how the region might change with a more "balanced" demographic between Christians, Jews and Muslims. Would the kibbutz still be a thing? Just anything that might be useful or interesting - even any possible PoDs from OTL in the region...

    TB is correct in that Argentina, sandwiched between the Empire of Brazil and the Realm of Patagonia, never tried to claim the Falklands due to the vast distance between them. However during the Argentine Civil War (a semi-theatre of the Second World War) some of the "fascist" government made revanchist claims to northern Patagonia and Brazilian Uruguay... I may be wrong, but my impression IOTL has always been that the Argentine claim to the Falklands in the late 20th century largely came from an attempt to distract the population at the end of the military dictatorship... (I may be wrong) so with no dictatorship, and a more western/British-aligned Argentina (much like OTL where Argentina was heavily involved in the British economic empire) never actively claims the islands.
     
  15. Israel_Dan the Man Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    Hmmm... well, if I were a betting boy, I’d bet that Kibbutzes still exist in the rural Jewish areas (I have a soft spot for them since my mom grew up in one and they are great places, I’ve visited a few). The Sinai could have more people if the amazing OTL Israeli agriculture tech is still around.

    Politics and elections would likely focus on all 3 main religions focusing on their parties. Jerusalem would likely have way more people than IOTL, due to how all 3 religions view it as a super special place and it already has 1 million IOTL. I don’t know much about the neighbors so I’m not sure how they’d act (Egypt may be a tad salty about not getting the Sinai).

    The army and secret service would not have the same global respect and prestige they have IOTL, due to the badassery of the Israeli army IOTL never being formed from decades of war and fighting terrorists. Global anti semitism would likely be lower, especially in Egypt and Mashriq.

    I would guess the Christian population would be mainly focused in the North (where OTL Lebanon is) and Jerusalem, the Jewish population would be focused in the center where OTL Israel (excluding the Negev) is , where there is Jerusalem and Tel Aviv and all the other big cities in OTL Israel, and the Muslims would focus in Jerusalem, the land East of Jerusalem (bordering Mashriq), and the south and Sinai.

    The head of the Jewish political parties could quite possibly be Netanyahu (say what you will, the man is great at economics), for Muslims and Christians I don't know who it would be.

    Though I have 3 questions about the Levant:

    1. How many people would you say Jerusalem has in the city proper? Would 3,560,410 be a good number?

    2. I know you don’t like talking about GDP, but just wondering, would say that a nominal GDP of $709 billion is a good match for the Republic of the Levant? It is a developed nation on your map of nations by HDI after all.

    3. Since the HDI is less than .85 but more than .8 for the Levant going by your map, would 0.843 be a good estimate?

    Question about something else: Are the Italian nations considering uniting into one Italy? Because I bet that it will have a much larger population than OTL Italy (the lands which Savoy has in mainland Italy IOTL have 15 million less people than what Savoy ITTL has) and a much larger economy (Savoy has $800 billion alone, compared to the $170 billion in the OTL lands it makes up). All they need is to unite (and get that Italian-majority area in South Tyrol from Austria if possible) to Make Italy Great Again!
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2019 at 9:54 AM
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  16. saint-tea Member

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    somewhere in iberia
    in california, what are relations like between the anglophone and hispanophone populations?
     
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  17. LeinadB93 Just Leinad

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    Yeah I can imagine the Kibbutzes still being around in the rural areas - but perhaps extending to a more general definition of rural collective agricultural communities across the Levant. Definitely in the Sinai and Negev as well!

    Yeah Jerusalem with about 3 million people would make sense.

    ATM the Levant is divided into 5 districts and 1 "union city". From the north it's Lebanon (OTL Lebanon excluding Sour, Bent Jbail and Marjaayoun), Galilee (OTL Sour, Bent Jbail, Marjaayoun and Israel's Northern District), Judea (OTL Center, Tel Aviv, Haifa and the West Bank north of Jerusalem), Palestine (OTL South District, Gaza, and the West Bank south of Jerusalem), and Sinai (OTL Sinai Peninsula).

    Jerusalem, Bethlehem and the surrounding areas form the "Union City of Jersualem" the nation's capital.

    Makes sense.

    Nah there are no movements to unite the Italian nations, any unification movement is pretty much discredited as neo-fascist/neo-futurist as a return to the Mussolini era.

    Pretty good, most anglophone are highly proficient in Spanish and vice versa. The two regions with majority anglophone populations - Klamath and Wasatch - both have spearatist movements, but generally there isn't much anti-hispanophone sentiment in either region.
     
  18. Israel_Dan the Man Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for your explanations, but I have 1 question:

    How do Egypt and Mashriq get along with the Levant? Badly like IOTL or more favorably than IOTL since about a third of the people are Muslims.

    I can also kinda understand why some don’t want a United Italy, shame though. It’s rare to find a timeline with a beefier Italy with more people and a bigger economy. Still, Savoy is my favorite European nation in your timeline.

    Though how is Poland doing? I’m guessing they have a lot more people than IOTL due to more land and no German genocide.

    And if you don't mind, could you tell me which EU country has the most people? I know that Savoy is 7th, and I know that Spain, France, Raetia, and Poland are more populous, but what are the other 2?
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2019 at 2:57 PM
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  19. Threadmarks: Vermont; 2015 legislative election

    LeinadB93 Just Leinad

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    And now for somewhere ITTL which is completely different. Thanks to @Turquoise Blue for a lot of the background ideas to this.

    Presenting, the Green Mountain Province:

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    Vermont, officially the Free Province of Vermont, is a province of New England located in the northwest of the country, bordered by New Hampshire to the east, Massachusetts to the south, the Columbian provinces of Nassouwen and Adirondack to the west, and the Canadian province of Quebec to the north. The only landlocked subdivision of New England, the geography of the province is dominated by the Green Mountains which run north-south and separate Lake Champlain in the west from the Connecticut River valley in the east. Vermont is the third-smallest province by population and one of three provinces to recognise French as an official language, with 10% of the population identifying French as their first language in the 2011 census.

    Indigenous people have inhabited what is now Vermont for some 12,000 years, with the Algonquian-speaking Mohican and Abenaki people inhabiting the western part of the province. During the 16th century, the Iroqouian-speaking Mohawk drove many of these tribes out of the Champlain Valley, warring with the surviving Abenaki. French explorer Jacques Cartier first visited what is now Vermont in 1535, but it was Samuel de Champlain who claimed the area as part of France's colony of New France in 1609. The late 17th century brought a period of colonial competition in the area between French settlements in the west and England's colonies in the east, and the frontier region was an important battleground during the Seven Years' War. Following the 1763 Treaty of Paris, France's colonies east of the Mississippi River, including Vermont, were ceded to Great Britain. From 1749, the colonial government of New Hampshire had made land grants on the territory claimed by New Hampshire west of the Connecticut River, territory that was also claimed by New York. The competing land claims in the region between the two colonies would continue for decades, contributing to the growing unrest in the British American colonies.

    In January 1777, delegates from 28 towns met and declared independence from the jurisdictions and land claims of the colonies of Quebec, New Hampshire and New York. Then known as the "New Hampshire Grants", Vermont was not recognised at the Colonial Congresses, due to the vehement objections from New York, but was allowed to send a delegate. The term "First Vermont Republic" is a 20th-century anachronism, as the territory at the time used the term "Province of Vermont", with a chief executive styled as a "governor". Later historians have called the Vermont Republic the "reluctant republic", because many early citizens remained loyal to the British Crown and favoured recognition as a separate colony and eventual union with the United Colonies. Following the colonial unrest and the 1783 Williamsburg Convention, Vermont was excluded from the loose confederation established among the colonies, primarily due to objections from New York. The province remained outside until 1795, when New York consented to Vermont's admission and the Crown Colony of Vermont was created.

    Vermonters were active abolitionist during the early 19th-century, with the province having partially abolished slavery in 1777, and campaigned for the end of the slave trade in the British Empire. Vermont was home to a short-lived uprising during the Republican Rebellion, when Premier Augustine Clarke declared himself president of the "Second Vermont Republic" in October 1850. This second republic lasted a matter of weeks before Clarke's supporters were defeated and the former premier was captured and executed for treason. Following the rebellion, Vermont became a quasi-palatinate, with the Dukes of Vermont, a Franco-Vermonter family descended from an ennobled French colonist, serving as governors of the province. Vermont, along with the other New England colonies, took part in the series of conferences that led to the creation of the Commonwealth of New England on 1 October 1866. Throughout the 19th and early 20th-centuries, English speakers came to dominate the population, although the Franco-Vermonters remained prominent, retaining their distinctive names, culture, language and traditions. In 1880, Vermont became one of the first parts of British America to grant limited suffrage to women.

    In the 20th-century, Vermont was hit by several natural disasters which devastated its agriculture and forestry industries, including several floods and hurricanes. Vermont's economy diversified over this period, with the agriculture, tourism, and forestry sectors being the most important. Demographically, Vermont is 93% white, with 2% black and 0.5% native and is dominated linguistically by Anglophones, with a substantial Francophone minority in the north and northwest of the province. Polticially, the province has transformed since the 1960s from a conservative province, to a left-liberal one, dominated politically by the Liberals and Progressive Democrats. Since the death of the 7th Duke in 1970, Vermont has appointed a governor from amongst its own citizens, but there is some talk of recreating the title and establishing a true palatinate in the province.

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    The 2015 Vermont legislative election was held on 25 November 2015 to elect, under the proportional representation system, the 130 members of the House of Delegates.

    Incumbent Premier David Zuckermen, leading a majority coalition of the left-wing Progressive Democrats and the ecological Greens, called an early election after having replaced Anthony Pollina in April following his sudden resignation. Although the minor partner the Greens were able to hold their seven seats, due to the widespread support for pro-environmental policies in Vermont, the PDP lost 12 seats, removing the coalition's majority in the house. The opposition centre-left Liberals, under new leader Naomi Bonnaire, a young Franco-Vermonter, ran a positive campaign on reduced taxes and more business incentives, balanced with a pledge to continue environmental protections. The Liberals secure an overall plurality in the house, and with a confidence and supply agreement from the centre-right moderate conservative Vermont Alliance, who gained 3 seats, were able to form a minority government.

    A surprisingly prominent issue at this election was the debate about the future constitutional status of Vermont as a province or a palatinate. The PDP and Greens were generally opposed to the appointment of a popular Vermonter as the new Duke/Duchess, whilst the Vermont Alliance were heavily in favour, with Milne making a referendum on the issue a key election pledge. The Liberals retained their ambiguous stance on the issue, although Bonnaire made more pro-ducal comments than past leaders. As part of the confidence and supply agreement, Bonnaire pledged to put together a cross-party committee to study the issue and make a recommendation in time for the next election, due before November 2020.

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    Last edited: Oct 14, 2019 at 9:04 AM
  20. Threadmarks: Premiers of Vermont

    LeinadB93 Just Leinad

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    And of course the follow-up list of heads of government of Vermont (more to come on the Dukes...maybe):

    Credit to @Turquoise Blue for this. With some edits from me :)

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    Premiers of Vermont (1795–)
    11. 1795–1797 Sir Thomas Chittenden† (Nonpartisan)
    12. 1797–1809 Sir Ethan Allen† (Vermonter majority)
    13. 1809–1809 Sir Paul Brigham (Vermonter majority)
    14. 1809–1817 Sir Nathaniel Chipman (Tory majority)
    15. 1817–1821 Dudley Chase (Tory majority)
    16. 1821–1839 Sir Joachim Leclair (Vermonter majority) [1]
    17. 1839–1845 Benjamin Swift (Vermonter majority)
    18. 1845–1850 Augustine Clarke (Radical majority)
    18. 1850–1850 Second Vermont Republic – President Augustine Clarke
    19. 1850–1864 Sir Julien Martel (Conservative majority) [1]
    10. 1864–1879 Sir George F. Edmunds (Conservative majority)
    11. 1879–1885 Guillaume Dubois (Liberal majority)
    12. 1885–1897 Joseph-Octave Arsenault† (Conservative majority)
    13. 1897–1901 Sir William P. Dillingham (Conservative majority)
    14. 1901–1912 Charles A. Prouty (Liberal majority)
    15. 1912–1919 Percival Clement (Liberal majority)
    16. 1919–1928 Aubin-Edmond Arsenault (Conservative majority)
    17. 1928–1943 James P. Leamy (Liberal majority)
    18. 1943–1958 Robert T. Stafford (Liberal majority) (1st)
    19. 1958–1964 Thomas M. Debevoise (Conservative majority)
    20. 1964–1966 William H. Meyer (LiberalSocial Democratic majority coalition) (1st)
    18. 1966–1970 Robert T. Stafford (LiberalConservative majority coalition) (2nd)
    20. 1970–1977 William H. Meyer (ProgressiveSocial Democratic majority coalition) (2nd)
    21. 1977–1983 Richard A. Snelling (ConservativeLiberal majority coalition)
    22. 1983–1997 Bernie Sanders (Progressive Democratic majority)
    23. 1997–2000 Pierre Clavelle (Progressive Democratic majority)
    24. 2000–2007 Viola Léger (LiberalVermont Alliance majority coalition)
    25. 2007–2015 Anthony Pollina (Progressive DemocraticGreen majority coalition)
    26. 2015–2015 David Zuckerman (Progressive DemocraticGreen majority coalition)
    27. 2015–2020 Naomi Bonnaire (Liberal minority, with Vermont Alliance support) [1]

    [1] - Fictional Individuals​
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2019 at 5:49 PM
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