Hail, Britannia

Discussion in 'Alternate History Maps and Graphics' started by LeinadB93, Jul 30, 2017.

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  1. StormStar King-Emperor of the Britannic Empire and Kingdom

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    Right wasn’t clear with the independence movements postidea.

    What I meant was independence movements in the United Empire and independence movements in other nations as I watched YouTube video a few months ago which premise was what parts of the world are currently fighting for independence.

    As for Commonwealth of Nations transformation it was more is there any movements or political parties looking to increase the CoN powers over the members states and the counter movements to that.
     
  2. celt9 Well-Known Member

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    Sep 25, 2017
    The next elections will Accra vote?
    Since the election will pretty much be in every time zone will the votes be counted after all the ballots have been entered so that does not affect anyones vote?
     
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  3. LeinadB93 Just Leinad

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    I'm afraid I don't have a clue... Pop culture is an area that I no next to nothing about. So I wouldn't like to guess.

    Without the OTL Troubles I would assume so, although U2 could have written a song about an equivalent massacre in the Louisiana Troubles. Or a Louisiana-based band does the same.

    As TB has said, all previous posts are linked to in the Pre-Thread Posts threadmark. Some of them are no longer canon, and have been superseded by subsequent posts in this thread.

    Well within the Empire, the most prominent nationalist/regionalist movements are the moment are in Acadiana, Florida, Cornwall, Ireland and Scotland. There are also strong(ish) separatist movements in Tasmania and Queensland, but they both campaign for new Home Nations rather than outright independence. The Jewish nationalists in Ararat (an autonomous territory of Westralia) are also quite prominent at the national level, but non-existent in the Imperial Parliament.

    Across the globe, the independence movements are too numerous to count. Most notably is the Breton movement. I'd imagined India and China have a fair few within their border, plus the Soviet Union probably has a few.

    Well Accra recently voted to join the United Empire, so that was pretty major.

    As TB has said, the Unionists in Patagonia wanted historically to join the United Empire. Although it's still one of their policies, support has declined in recent decades. The only other sovereign state with a notable movement is Kenya, but much like Patagonia it is not-mainstream.

    A post on the Commonwealth is in the works.

    The Commonwealth of Nations is significantly bigger, and more influential, than OTL. Best described as "Britain, India and satellites" and most countries are members of the Commonwealth Economic Community and the Common Defence Pact. There are no major movements in favour of strengthening the powers of the Commonwealth over member states, as many see that as a creeping return to colonialism.

    Accra isn't a member of the Empire yet. Negotiations between the British and Accran governments probably won't begin until after the election. However Accrans are hopefully that their entry can be fast-tracked, so they might join the Union before 2019.

    The British parties are generally neutral on the issue (with the exception of the Populists and Heritage who oppose Accra joining the Union), but George W. Bush set a precedent by calling a referendum on Sierra Leone's accession in 2001. So we might get a referendum before Accra formally accedes to the Union.

    I hadn't really thought about that... Just another complication in holding an election on a global scale!!!!

    My gut feeling is that each dominion announces the results for their constituencies whenever they've finished counting. So New Zealand and Fiji (the furthest east), would announce their results about 22:00 local time (11:00 BST), then Australia at 13:00 BST, and so on. Every country's polls close at 9pm local time, except Alaska which closes at 8pm to allow Canada's constituencies to be called at 06:00 BST.

    I've worked up a rough chart showing when each country will announce the results in their constituencies, but my thinking is that the overall popular vote will only be announced after Canada and Oregon's results at 06:00 on Friday 20th April. In theory this should reduce bias in the later dominions, as the overall vote decides which party can form a government (due to list seats) rather than the number of individual constituencies.

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    Bloody hell this might kill me...
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2018
  4. Threadmarks: Tasmania; 2014 state election; 2018 state election; 1937 secession referendum; Tasmania Party

    LeinadB93 Just Leinad

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    So here's a shift away from the focus on North America to look at part of Australia that's fairly different from OTL.

    Major credit to @Turquoise Blue as much of this was her work, I just converted it to infobox form.

    Hope you enjoy :)

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    Tasmania is one of the nine states and territories of the Commonwealth of Australia, located 150 miles south of the Australian mainland, separated from Victoria by the Bass Strait. The state covers the main island of Tasmania and the neighbouring 334 islands, with a total population of about 512,000 as of the 2011 census, although due to a mapping error it shares a land border with the state of Victoria on Boundary Islet.

    Inhabited by Aboriginies for about 40,000 years, Tasmania was first sighted by Europeans in 1642 when Dutch explorer Abel Tasman landed at today’s Blackmans Bay. Despite several expeditions in 1770s and 1790s, which established that Tasmania was an island, colonial settlement would begin nearly 150 years after the island’s discovery. Whalers had based themselves on Tasmania’s islands since 1798, but it wasn’t until 1803 when a small military outpost was established by the British on the Derwent River, in order to deter any French claims to the islands.

    At first, Tasmania was home to several convict-based settlements, including what later became known as Hobart, and over the course of its history as a penal colony received 65,000 convicts, nearly two fifths of all those transported to Australia. Free settlers began to arrive in the 1820s, drawn by land grants and the promise of free convict labour. By 1830, one-third of Australia’s non-aboriginal population lived on Tasmania, and the island accounted for about half of all cultivated land on the continent. Between the 1820s and 30s, the “Black War” took place, as violence between the white colonial population and the black aborigines escalated. Aboriginal raids on settlements, and the white revenge attacks, led to many mass-killings and by 1831, the Aboriginal population had fallen to about 300. In 1832, Tasmania’s indigenous population were forcibly removed to Flinders Island, an act considered by historians to amount to genocide or ethnic cleansing.

    The island, then known as Van Diemen’s Land, was proclaimed a separate British colony in 1825, although it initially lacked self-government. The transportation of convicts to the colony ceased in 1853, partly as a result of pressure from the Anti-Transportation League, but also due to the beginning of the Victorian gold rush. Some of the last convicts to arrive on the island were American republicans, who had been exiled for their actions during the rebellion in British America. After a long campaign for self-government, the colony was granted a constitution in 1856 and formally changed its name to “Tasmania”. The 1850s and 60s saw rapid social and cultural development, despite Tasmania suffering from a large loss of working-age males to the Victorian gold fields, and in 1868 the colony became one of the first parts of the British Empire to adopt compulsory education. In 1878, the Tasmanian government established the Tasmanian Volunteer Forces as a local militia, and the auxiliary force remains one of the few state level militaries in existence within the Empire to the present day.

    In 1901, Tasmania joined with five other colonies to form the Commonwealth of Australia, the twelfth dominion to be admitted to the United Empire, and the first since 1876. During the early 20th century, Tasmania became home to some of the earliest protected areas and national parks in Australia, but also suffered economically, leading to a rise in support for secessionism. The success of the Westralia referendum in 1933, led to the Nationalists under Sir Walter Lee calling a referendum in Tasmania in 1937. Although Tasmanians voted in favour of secession, the election of Labour that same year, who would dominate Tasmania politically for three decades, and measures taken by the federal government, led to a decline in support for secession. The state has remained politically dominated by the Labour party, punctuated by occasional periods of Liberal rule, to the present day, and despite periodic surges in support for secessionism, has remained part of Australia.

    Modern Tasmania is characterised by an ethnically homogenous population, with more than 65% of Tasmanians being descended from a few thousand “founding families” and more than 80% being born in the state. This ethnic homogeneity has given rise to a strong regional identity amongst Tasmanians, fuelling the periodic surges in secessionism. Economically the state is dominated by the agricultural and tourism sectors, and the natural beauty, combined with cheaper air fares, has made the state a popular travel destination for people across the Empire.

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    The 2014 Tasmania state election was held on 5 April 2014 to elect, under the single transferable voting system, the 25 members of the Tasmanian House of Assembly, five of which are elected in each of the five state divisions.

    The incumbent Liberal government, led by Premier Elise Archer, sought a second consecutive term in office, however the defection of Craig Davey to the regionalist Tasmania Party in 2012 had weakened the party’s control of the legislature. The informal agreement with the environmentalist Future Party was also unstable, as the two parties clashed publically over environmental protections in the Tasmanian timber industry. In opposition, Labour, under new leader David Llewellyn, had their own issues, with the defection of Bryan Walpole to form the centrist Democrats in 2013.

    On election day, the popular vote swung towards Labour, with the Liberals haemorrhaging support to emboldened Tasmania party, who managed to unseat Archer in her own seat. However, the final result left no one party with a majority, and the state Governor invited Llewellyn, as leader of the largest party, to attempt to form a government. Securing support from both Future, who had lost a seat, and the remaining member of the left-wing Socialist People’s Party, Llewellyn was able to form a minority government. The Liberals accepted the result, with Archer resigning from the party leadership the following day.

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    The 2018 Tasmania state election was held on 24 March 2018 to elect, under the single transferable voting system, the 25 members of the Tasmanian House of Assembly, five of which are elected in each of the five state divisions.

    The four-year incumbent Labour government, led by Premier David Llewellyn, won a second consecutive term over their Liberal opposition, led by Jeremy Rockliff. However despite minor gains for Labour, who secure an extra seat at the expense of the Liberals, the main winners were the Tasmania Party. Under new state leader, and former Liberal member, Craig Davey the party had shifted to the right, pursuing liberal conservative policies and advocating for Tasmanian secessionism. On election day, the party saw their vote share increase by nearly 75%, and they came within one seat of forming the opposition.

    Labour's unofficial government partners, Future and the SPP saw their vote share drop, with Future losing a single seat, and neither party were vocal about continuing their arrangement with Llewellyn. Walpole’s Democrats managed to increase their popular vote, but failed to gain any additional seats. On election day, the state Governor once again invited the Labour party leader to form a government, which he was able to do as the parties of the centre and left united against the Liberals.

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    The 1937 Tasmania secession referendum was held on 20 February 1937 in the Australian state of Tasmania, to ask the electorate whether the state should withdraw from the Australian Federation and establish a separate dominion within the United Empire. Building on the success of the Westralian secession referendum four years earlier, the Tasmanian government hoped that secession from Australia would boost the state’s lagging economy. The proposal won a majority of votes, but the incoming Labour government of Albert Ogilvie did not act on the results of the non-binding referendum. A report in 1938 from the Commonwealth Grants Commission, recommending that Tasmania received £300,000 in 1939-40, significantly reduced the Tasmanian demand for secession.

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    The Tasmania Party is an Australian political party that operates exclusively in the state of Tasmania. The party was founded in 1996 when the Tasmania Country Party, the state member of the federal Australian Country Party, dissolved itself. Campaigning on a centrist platform of liberal conservatism, agrarianism, the party has gained support in recent years. At the 2014 federal election the party took a majority of the vote in Tasmania, securing a single seat in the Federal Parliament, and at the 2014 state election the party achieved third place and increased their share of the vote six-fold.

    Rebranding itself as a conservative regionalist party, which favours Tasmania’s secession from Australia as a separate dominion, has been a popular move. At the 2018 state election, the party, under new state leader Craig Davey came close to unseating the Liberals as the opposition party. Political pundits are predicting that, if the rise in popularity continues, at the next election the party could form the next Tasmanian government.

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    Last edited: Apr 9, 2018
  5. StormStar King-Emperor of the Britannic Empire and Kingdom

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    Quick Question when did U.K.E change to the new flag I am assuming it is after 2017.
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2018
  6. Lewie Well-Known Member

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    Dec 8, 2014
    Great work, as usual.
    I can ask,
    What is the perception of Tasmania secessionism in the rest of Australia? Is the movement solely for the formation of a separate Dominion within the empire, or is there a full Independence faction.
    Also, interesting flag, have the other Australia states changed their flags.
    Can't wait to see more.
     
  7. LeinadB93 Just Leinad

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    I.m assuming you're referring to the flag from Ad Astra, and if so that was probably in the late 21st/early 22nd century. So not anytime soon.

    Thanks :)

    Mainland Australian reaction to Tasmanian secessionism is probably very similar to OTL English reaction to Scottish nationalism. IMHO that means some want them to get lost, whilst most are fearful that Tasmania leaving the Commonwealth could pave the way for the collapse of Australia into it's separate states. Queensland has a similarly strong secessionist movement, whilst Bougainville and the Solomon Islands have a movement for independence as a Commonwealth realm.

    The Tasmanian movement is soley for the formation of a separate Dominion with the Empire, whereas the Queensland movement is heavily tinged with republicanism.

    Thanks on the flag, it's based on the OTL flags of the Northern and Capital territories. I haven't decided on whether the other states adopt a similar design, with the southern cross at the hoist and then a unique design to the fly. Victoria probably definitely stays as a Blue or Red Ensign, whilst the others may change. I've got a post about Australia in the works, and will include data on the states and territories, along with their flags.
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2018
  8. Lewie Well-Known Member

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    Dec 8, 2014
    Thank you very much for the answer, I really do enjoy your flag design. I'm a sucker for alternate flags.
    Now this surprises me, given Queensland's status as the state that voted most heavily to retain the monarchy in the 1999 referendum, so I must ask why does the movement have a Republican tinge?
    As an Australia (looking forward to the post), given much of the mainlands attitude towards Tasmania, that being "oh yeah that place exists", I fell like the reaction would lean towards "well as much as I don't care about Tasmania we could lose the whole country if they leave, so just give them what they want".
    Also, are Bougainville and the Solomon Islands states or Territories?
    And, while I'm late to the party, could I request some information on the last election in the Imperial Constituency in eastern Victoria. I noticed its Social Democratic, and living here I thought it odd.
    Thank you very much for your amazing work.
     
  9. LeinadB93 Just Leinad

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    Me too :)

    TBH I just thought it added something different. I suppose with this being an ATL, we could assume that Australia remaining part of the Empire means monarchism is more mainstream, so perhaps Queensland has a stronger republican sentiment in opposition to the dominance of the southeast of Australia?

    I'd assume that although the Queensland secession movement has a strong republican tinge, this perhaps isn't in the mainstream of the party's message? Instead focusing on secession as a separate Dominion as the first step to full independence as a realm or republic?

    That actually just about sums it up!

    IMHO ;) in the event that Tasmania did secede, you'd probably see Queensland, Northern Territory, Bougainville and the Solomon Islands separate off as their own Dominion, with New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia and the Capital Territory forming a rump Australia.

    Bougainville is a territory, whilst the Solomon Islands are a state. I was tempted to include the OTL Papua Territory as a state as well, but it's a bit late in the game to make that major a change.

    That would be Gippsland. I'll add it to the (very long) list of requests.

    You are very welcome :D
     
  10. Lewie Well-Known Member

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    Dec 8, 2014
    Thank you.
    Yeah, I could see that, if Monarchism is more popular I would think we might see something similar to the debate in the Scottish referendum, leave with the monarchy, a second vote to decide the issue later. It would allow the movement to avoid annoying either Republicans and Monarchists, doing what politicians always do, kick the problem down the line to the next guy. As for the idea that it would be a reaction to monarchism in the south, I can totally see that to. An Independence minded Queenslander would seek to remove anything related to Australia, which in this case would be the Crown. That's what they would argue at least, "I mean what would be the point of being a Free Nation if we still had the Queen". I would imagine any major Independence movement, outside of the Isles maybe, would be Republican in nature.
    That said, is Queensland's aim Independence or Dominion hood.
    Thank you very much. Can't wait to see the Australia page.
     
  11. StormStar King-Emperor of the Britannic Empire and Kingdom

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    Two problem with that one most, but not all, of the commonwealth of nations still has the Queen-Empress as the head of state and two in this timeline the republican form of government is mostly seen as a failed experiment with only socialist republics succeeding to any meaningful extent and even then most have failed.
     
  12. LeinadB93 Just Leinad

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    That's definitely the Queensland secession movement's view. In theory their goals are to first secede from Australia as a separate Dominion (ideally with expanded territory), then to gain full independence from the Empire (probably as a realm), and then finally transition to a republic.

    I think independence movements in Britain-in-America (bar Florida) are very much anti-republican, a legacy of the Republican Rebellion.

    Actually only four or five of the 46 Commonwealth members have the Queen-Empress as head of state, with sixteen members being republics and the remaining 26-27 being monarchies with a local ruler.

    You are correct, in that republican governments are seen as less stable than monarchies - but this is mainly comparing a presidential system (OTL USA) to a parliamentary one. So parliamentary republics like OTL Germany would be seen as a decent compromise. ITTL it is presidential republics that are seen as inherently unstable, whereas parliamentary ones are generally better.
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2018
  13. Zyxoriv Jack of all trades, master of none.

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    Were any of the House of Hanover Kings in real life still kings of the UK ITTL or were they kings of the Kingdom of Hanover?
     
  14. LeinadB93 Just Leinad

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    Yep, the succession of the House of Hanover is slightly delayed as Sophia lives a couple of months longer. The full list of British monarchs is here.

    Hanover and Britain were in personal union up until the accession of Victoria. Hanover falls to the Prussians as OTL before being restored post-WW2.
     
  15. RMcD94 Well-Known Member

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    How did Papua New Guinea end up with an identical border?

    Edit: Actually a lot of SEA is very similar to OTL
     
  16. LeinadB93 Just Leinad

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    A merger of the mandate of New Guinea and the territory of Papua, just as OTL. I’m tempted to merge it with West Papua, but haven’t decided on that just yet.

    A lot of Southeast Asia is similar to OTL, but there are a few key differences; independent Aceh and Sarawak, surviving Sultanate of Sulu, also the dark green state is East Sunda, a former Portuguese territory in personal union with Portugal.
     
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  17. Threadmarks: Houston—Sharpstown; States of the Republic of Texas

    LeinadB93 Just Leinad

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    Just to tide you over until I finish the Australian write-up, a little something to flesh out Texas, which will hopefully please @Wolfram.

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    Houston—Sharpstown is an electoral district of the Texas House of Representatives located in the State of Matagorda. It lies in the Greater Houston area, covering the Sharpstown and Chinatown areas, and includes the Houston Baptist University. Houston—Sharpstown is a predominantly Hispanic district, but also includes the highest Asian population of the Greater Houston area, who make up 15% of the district's population, and is dominated by blue-collar workers. The current representative from Houston—Sharpstown is Gene Wu (Reform), who has held the district since the 2014 federal election. Historically, the district has tilted to the left, particularly since the Sharpstown scandal of the 1970s. Most election contests take place between the Liga Chicano and Reform, while the conservative Christian Democrats are almost nonexistent in the district. Houston—Sharpstown has been held by members of the Reform party continuously since the 1980s, first by Debra Danburg between 1981 and 2002, then Scott Hochberg between 2002 and 2014, and currently by Gene Wu.

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    Texas is divided into nine states and one federal district, which are bound together in union with each other. Each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a defined area and shares sovereignty with the Texan federal government. Due to this shared sovereignty, Texans are citizens of both the federal republic and the state in which they reside. No government approval is require to move between states, except for Navajo, where the right of residency is restricted. State governments are governed through their individual constitutions, all of which are grounded in republican principles, and seven are governed as presidential republics, whilst the other three (Matagorda, Sabine, and Sonora) are organised under a parliamentary system. Although the states possess few powers under the Texan Constitution, since the 1870s there has been a general trend in Texas towards decentralisation of powers from the federal government, with the tasks of local law enforcement, education, and the regulation of local transportation and infrastructure now considered primarily state responsibilities. There is a continuing debate over states' rights, which concerns the extent and nature of the states' powers and sovereignty in relation to the federal government and the rights of individuals.

    The 1876 Constitution created the original four states of Matagorda, Sabine, Nueces, and Comancheria, along with three territories that later became the states of Pecos, Llano, and New Mexico, all of which were admitted in 1912. Navajo was originally established in 1868 as a reserve for the Texan First Nations, and would gain statehood in 1934. Sonora is the only state to have joined the republic from another sovereign state, and was formed as the Sonora Territory out of territories ceded to Texas by Mexico after the First World War, before being admitted as the eighth state in 1924. The Federal District of Austin was created in 1876 as a capital district separate from the authority of any state, under the exclusive jurisdiction of the federal government. Austin, which had been the Texan capital since 1839, was located on the boundary between the states of Matagorda, Comancheria, and Nueces, and as a compromise the three states all ceded land to the federal government which formed a municipal government for the district. Austin de facto enjoys the same status and rights of the nine states, but is legally a territory of the federal government, despite movements advocating for statehood.

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    Last edited: Jun 2, 2019
  18. Great_Stag Monarchist. Existentialist. Liberal. Banned

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    Is there any backstory for Sabine, with its Union Jack canton? When I first saw it I thought maybe the orginal settlers were Brits. If so then why doesn't Sabine use a parliamentary system?
     
  19. StormStar King-Emperor of the Britannic Empire and Kingdom

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    Not only that but it’s a kingdom of Great Britain Union Jack so it was settled before 1801.
     
  20. LeinadB93 Just Leinad

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    Pre-1876 ITTL. The flag of Great Britain also appears in the canton of the flag of the Ohioan State of Wasatch, and was common on most flags in British America until they were updated post-1876.

    Sabine was heavily settled by the British, and in the immediate post-independence period was the area most ardently in favour of union with Britain. The inclusion of the old Union Flag in the Sabine flag represents the heritage of the region and their ties to British America. I’d assume that Sabine is home to the most pro-monarchist and pro-British Texans (though not that many).

    Actually it does make more sense for Sabine to be a parliamentary system. Consider it changed :) Probably with a Westminster system modelled after an OTL Canadian province’s system.
     
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