Hail, Britannia

I would actually be interested in finding out about what kinda issues exist in this world. Like for one, I'm almost certain that global warming is definitely worse than in OTL due to the increaed industrialisation in the Third World. How stable are the other great powers? Does Capeland have any issues with apartheid? China seems a lot weaker here whereas Japan looks a quite a bit stronger seeing that they have Taiwan and North Sakhalin. Is Russia influencing the EU at all? Is the UK influencing the EU? Bigger countries in Africa means tihat they have more ethnic minorities and thus potentially more issues.

I ask all of this mainly because the view of the world show seems a little bit idealistic.
 
I would actually be interested in finding out about what kinda issues exist in this world. Like for one, I'm almost certain that global warming is definitely worse than in OTL due to the increaed industrialisation in the Third World. How stable are the other great powers? Does Capeland have any issues with apartheid? China seems a lot weaker here whereas Japan looks a quite a bit stronger seeing that they have Taiwan and North Sakhalin. Is Russia influencing the EU at all? Is the UK influencing the EU? Bigger countries in Africa means tihat they have more ethnic minorities and thus potentially more issues.

I ask all of this mainly because the view of the world show seems a little bit idealistic.
Off the top of my head
  • While industrialization is more widespread than OTL, global warming denialism is weaker and more progress has been made on renewable energy compared to our world
  • Capeland abolished apartheid in the 1980 constitution
  • China may control less territory than OTL, but they're also stronger economically due to avoiding Mao Zedong's disastrous policies
  • Relations between Russia and the West seem a lot friendlier here since ITTL Russia's post-Cold War history has been less turbulent
 

LeinadB93

Monthly Donor
I do wonder how the Second Indochina War would be portrayed in popular culture. IOTL, the United States failed to stop South Vietnam from falling to communism, so portrayals of the Vietnam War in fiction generally tend to be bleak. Here, Britain managed to triumph over the communists, Cochina is a thriving democracy and Annam, while still an isolationist dictatorship, doesn't appear to have reached the level of insanity of OTL North Korea. I think portrayals of this conflict, while hardly rosy, would be far less dark than of OTL Vietnam.
I wouldn't say that Britain triumphed over the Communists, as the Second Indochina War was more of a stalemate. I think the portrayals might be less dark than OTL, but still pretty dark given how long the conflict lasted, the war crimes and lives lost, as well as the inconclusive outcome that is arguably still ongoing to this day.

So, did he appear throughout the episode like 10 and 11 or was War just shown regenerating into him at the end?
He appeared throughout the episode.

Can I ask what Ruth Bader Ginsberg did ITTL?
I hope she was as succesful as OTL, since as bad as it was to take land from the natives, I really like having rights.
Ruth Bader Ginsberg sat as a Justice on the Supreme Court of the United Empire from 1994 to her mandatory retirement in 2018 at the age of 85.

What happened to Churchill to make him step down? I can't imagine him voluntarily leaving office while the war is still going on.
Since he was never PM after 1945, maybe he pulled a Roosevelt and died?
If he had died in office, it would say so in the list.
Maybe he just retired because of massive health problems (but didn’t die)?
Churchill had a minor stroke in July 1945, not as serious as his 1953 one, but serious enough to cause him to step back as PM. Truman (as Deputy PM) steps into the role with the support of the Wartime Coalition, as no Tory wants to be seen to be taking advantage of the ill health of "the man who defeated Hitler". Truman stays in post until the 1946 election, when the coalition dissolves and Attlee becomes PM.

I wish this timeline was real
So say we all.
Indeed :)

Does France still try to set up a puppet state in Mexico in the 1860s? If not, then what happens to Maximilian?
Nope, so Maxillian is a relatively un-noteworthy Austrian Archudke who died at some point in the early 1900s.
 
Speaking of WW2, I noticed that the Soviet Union invaded Manchuria at the same time as OTL. Assuming that Nazi Germany capitulates at the same time as OTL, I wonder why the Soviets would wait three months to invade when they've been at war against China for four years.
 
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LeinadB93

Monthly Donor
I would actually be interested in finding out about what kinda issues exist in this world. Like for one, I'm almost certain that global warming is definitely worse than in OTL due to the increaed industrialisation in the Third World. How stable are the other great powers? Does Capeland have any issues with apartheid? China seems a lot weaker here whereas Japan looks a quite a bit stronger seeing that they have Taiwan and North Sakhalin. Is Russia influencing the EU at all? Is the UK influencing the EU? Bigger countries in Africa means tihat they have more ethnic minorities and thus potentially more issues.

I ask all of this mainly because the view of the world show seems a little bit idealistic.
Off the top of my head
  • While industrialization is more widespread than OTL, global warming denialism is weaker and more progress has been made on renewable energy compared to our world
  • Capeland abolished apartheid in the 1980 constitution
  • China may control less territory than OTL, but they're also stronger economically due to avoiding Mao Zedong's disastrous policies
  • Relations between Russia and the West seem a lot friendlier here since ITTL Russia's post-Cold War history has been less turbulent
All excellent points. I will answer them as best I can:
  • Global Warming - while there has been greater action amongst the developed world (Europe, East Asia, China and the Americas) the increased industrialisation across the OTL developing world (Africa, India and Southeast Asia) has definitely counterbalanced a lot of the successes in the developed world. Green and renewable energy developments have begun to become more widespread than OTL, and I'd say global warming and the effects are about a decade behind OTL. One of the issues is the high cost of renewal energy compared to the low cost of ecologically damaging fuel sources, and the reluctance of many western corportations/countries to subsidise renewable technologies for the developing world.
  • Apartheid - Capeland continues to suffer the after affects of TTL's Apartheid. Apartheid here didn't escalate to the establishment of Bantustans in Capeland, but it did in Rhodesia. Both countries continue to suffer from ethnic tensions, with most money and land being held by whites while the majority black population suffers from a lot of poverty. Similar issues also exist in Luanda. The larger African countries also suffer from occassional ethnic clashes and violence, particularly Katanga, Adamawa, Ethiopia, Mozambique (TTLs Gukurahundi). There is also an historic tendency for violence towards Euro-Africans and Indians in many countries, resulting in many groups relocating. The Levant also suffered an ethnic-based conflict in the late-20th century which has had a lasting impact on the region.
  • China & Japan - both countries boast strong economies but the former is weaker militarily than OTL, while Japan is stronger. China has in recent decades abandoned its long standing neutrality to join the Soviet led CSTO along with Iran.
  • Russia & the West - relations are definitely better than OTL, but there is definitely Soviet and British influence within the EU. However the USSR is largely expanding its influence in China, Southeast Asia and Africa. Since Dimitry Medvedev's election in 2014, many western pundits have characterised the relations between the USSR and the West as the "Third Great Game" with both the Soviet-led CSTO and the British-led CDP competing for influence in the Middle East and Africa, and both countries are starting to be quite wary of each other.
  • Other Issues - the ongoing War in West Africa and the disputes between Transcaucasia and Pontus are the major military issues at present. Venezuela is also likely to a major spark point in the coming years. The Great Regressions is becoming a major economic issue, while race relations in Carolina and Louisiana are still fraught. Mexico and New Granada, despite their general stability and better development, are still beset by drug problems and guerrilla warfare in parts of both countries.
I know that the world seems to be idealistic and generally better, but part of that is just that I prefer to focus on the "good" bits of this timeline than the bad.
 

LeinadB93

Monthly Donor
Speaking of WW@, I noticed that the Soviet Union invaded Manchuria at the same time as OTL. Assuming that Nazi Germany capitulates at the same time as OTL, I wonder why the Soviets would wait three months to invade when they've been at war against China for four years.
Manpower shortage. They suffered a lot more deaths due to the two-pronged attack, and had a lot of manpower tied up on the Eastern Front against Nazi Germany.
 
Chilean Republic (1939-1995)

LeinadB93

Monthly Donor


Nacista Chile, officially the Chilean Republic and known in Chile as the Nacista dictatorship, is the period of Chilean history between 1939 and 1995 when the country was ruled by a right-wing fascist and authoritarian military regime. The state was established after the democratically-elected government of Carlos Ibáñez del Campo was overthrown in a Nacista-led coup d'état on 5 September 1939, and replaced by a fascist regime under the Popular Socialist Vanguard, led by Jorge González von Marées as President. The dictatorship originally took the form of a "fascistised dictatorship", modelled on the fascist regimes in Germany, Spain and the Italian states, although it distanced itself from some aspects of those regimes and introduced a more domestic form of fascism.

During the Second World War, Chile did not join the axis powers, nevertheless Chile supported them in various ways throughout most of the war, while maintaining its neutrality. Because of this, Chile was isolated by many other countries for nearly three decades after the end of the Second World War, while its autarkic economy suffered chronic depression. Following the death of González von Marées in 1962, Fernando Alessandri suceeded him as President and leader of the Popular Socialist Vanguard. Despite Alessandri's efforts to introduce political and economic reforms, his progressive decline of eyesight weakened his position as leader, and he eventually retired in 1970, replaced by Miguel Serrano.

Serrano, an occultist and proponent of Esoteric Hitlerism, was a generally ineffective President, with most power consolidated in the party leadership. In 1973, amidst the worsening economic situation and the breakdown in the party leadership, General Augusto Pinochet led a military coup d'état that overthrew Serrano and installed a joint Nacista-military junta headed by Pinochet. Reforms were implemented that abandoned autarky and transferred authority from the Nacista movement to a group of technocrats under military supervision, although the state remained nominally fascist. This led to massive economic growth, and the end to Chile's international isolation, although the regime remained totalitarian - characterised by the suppression and persecution of dissidents.

Under Pinochet, opposition politicians and critics were persecuted, with more than 3,000 deaths, the internment of as many as 80,000 people and the torture of tens of thousands. Free-market economics produced high economic growth, but increased inequality, with the banning of trade unions and the forced privatisation of state-owned industries, many at below market prices. Throughout the 1990s, Chile was one of the strongest-performing economies in Latin America, though Pinochet's crackdown on dissidents resulted in growing social unrest. On 26 October 1995, Pinochet was assinated in Santiago by the FPMR, when his military bodyguards were attacked and his vehicle hit by a rocket, killing Pinochet instantly. Amidst the chaos following his death, the military moved to ensure law and order following widespread protests, while Jorge Martínez Busch suceeded Pinochet as President and began the Chilean transition to democracy, which lasted until the promulgation of the 1998 constitution and the creation of the parliamentary Fifth Republic.
 
Churchill had a minor stroke in July 1945, not as serious as his 1953 one, but serious enough to cause him to step back as PM. Truman (as Deputy PM) steps into the role with the support of the Wartime Coalition, as no Tory wants to be seen to be taking advantage of the ill health of "the man who defeated Hitler". Truman stays in post until the 1946 election, when the coalition dissolves and Attlee becomes PM.
What happens to Churchill after the war? I assume health issues force him to retire from politics.
 
Ruth Bader Ginsburg (1933-2020)

LeinadB93

Monthly Donor
Can you do a wikibox for RBG ITTL?
A lot of this is taken from Wikipedia:



Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Baroness Bader Ginsburg (born Joan Ruth Bader; 15 March 1933 – 18 September 2020), also known as Lady Bader Ginsburg, was the first woman Chief Justice and President of the Supreme Court of the United Empire from 2008 to 2018, and the second woman Justice of the Supreme Court of the United Empire from 1993 to 2018. A feminist and civil rights icon, Ginsburg was viewed as a moderate consensus-builder on the Supreme Court, preferring to build cautiously on precedent. She publicly argued that the judiciary needed to become more diverse so that the public have greater confidence in judges, and called for more balanced representation of women and minority groups in British courts.

Ginsburg was born and grew up in Brooklyn, New York. Her older sister died when she was a baby, and her mother died shortly before Ginsburg graduated from high school. She earned her bachelor's degree at Cornell University and married Martin D. Ginsburg, becoming a mother before starting law school at Harvard, where she was one of the few women in her class. Ginsburg transferred to Trinity College, New York, where she graduated joint first in her class. During the early 1960s she worked with the New York University Project on International Procedure, learned Swedish and co-authored a book with Nordic jurist Anders Bruzelius; her work in Scandinavia profoundly influenced her thinking on gender equality. She then became a professor at Rutgers Law School and Trinity College, New York, teaching civil procedure as one of the few women in her field.

Ginsburg spent much of her legal career as an advocate for gender equality and women's rights, winning many arguments before the Supreme Courts of Columbia and Virginia. She advocated as a volunteer attorney for the British American Civil Liberties Union and was a member of its board of directors and one of its general counsel in the 1970s, as well as serving on the Law Commission from 1977 to 1981. In 1981, Columbian First Minister Daniel Moynihan appointed her to the Supreme Court of Columbia to succeed Sir Max Rosenn, where she served until her appointment to the Imperial Supreme Court. In 1993, Justice Secretary Bill Clinton nominated her to succeed Lord Blackmun, making her the second woman to serve on the court, and in 2008 Justice Secretary Jeff Sessions nominated her to replace Lord Bingham as Chief Justice, a position she held until her retirement in March 2018. She was succeeded by Lord Thomas.

Ginsburg died at her home in Fredericksburg, Maryland, on 18 September 2020, at the age of 87, from complications of metastatic pancreatic cancer. Ginsburg was honoured with a ceremonial state funeral, following a private ceremony at the Royal Courts of Justice her casket was moved to lay in state in Westminster Hall before being escorted in a formal procession through Central London followed by an interfaith memorial service. Her casket was returned to Columbia for a private burial attended by family and close friends.
 
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LeinadB93

Monthly Donor
An esoteric Hitlerist as President of Chile is certainly a scary thought.
Indeed. But he didn't last long and most of the power was consolidated in the party leadership.

What happens to Churchill after the war? I assume health issues force him to retire from politics.
He recovers enough to remain as Leader of the Opposition and the Conservative party leader until 1951, when he retires and is granted the title of Duke of London.
 
One possible quibble, Justice Ginsburg was Jewish OTL. Would she then be buried at St. Paul's Cathedral after a church service? Would she not instead have been buried in a fashion respecting Jewish customs?
 
A lot of this is taken from Wikipedia:



Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Baroness Bader Ginsburg (born Joan Ruth Bader; 15 March 1933 – 18 September 2020), also known as Lady Bader Ginsburg, was the first woman Chief Justice and President of the Supreme Court of the United Empire from 2008 to 2018, and the second woman Justice of the Supreme Court of the United Empire from 1993 to 2018. A feminist and civil rights icon, Ginsburg was viewed as a moderate consensus-builder on the Supreme Court, preferring to build cautiously on precedent. She publicly argued that the judiciary needed to become more diverse so that the public have greater confidence in judges, and called for more balanced representation of women and minority groups in British courts.

Ginsburg was born and grew up in Brooklyn, New York. Her older sister died when she was a baby, and her mother died shortly before Ginsburg graduated from high school. She earned her bachelor's degree at Cornell University and married Martin D. Ginsburg, becoming a mother before starting law school at Harvard, where she was one of the few women in her class. Ginsburg transferred to Trinity College, New York, where she graduated joint first in her class. During the early 1960s she worked with the New York University Project on International Procedure, learned Swedish and co-authored a book with Nordic jurist Anders Bruzelius; her work in Scandinavia profoundly influenced her thinking on gender equality. She then became a professor at Rutgers Law School and Trinity College, New York, teaching civil procedure as one of the few women in her field.

Ginsburg spent much of her legal career as an advocate for gender equality and women's rights, winning many arguments before the Supreme Courts of Columbia and Virginia. She advocated as a volunteer attorney for the British American Civil Liberties Union and was a member of its board of directors and one of its general counsel in the 1970s, as well as serving on the Law Commission from 1977 to 1981. In 1981, Columbian First Minister Daniel Moynihan appointed her to the Supreme Court of Columbia to succeed Sir Max Rosenn, where she served until her appointment to the Imperial Supreme Court. In 1993, Justice Secretary Bill Clinton nominated her to succeed Lord Blackmun, making her the second woman to serve on the court, and in 2008 Justice Secretary Jeff Sessions nominated her to replace Lord Bingham as Chief Justice, a position she held until her retirement in March 2018. She was succeeded by Lord Thomas.

Ginsburg died at her home in Fredericksburg, Maryland, on 18 September 2020, at the age of 87, from complications of metastatic pancreatic cancer. Ginsburg was honoured with a ceremonial state funeral, following a private ceremony at the Royal Courts of Justice her casket was moved to lay in state in Westminster Hall before being escorted in a formal procession through Central London, followed by a church service and burial at St Paul's Cathedral.
I was hoping you would do one to honor her memory.
 

LeinadB93

Monthly Donor
How many seats does the Imperial Supreme Court have? How does the appointments process work?
15 seats, appointed by the Justice Secretary after being nominated by an independent selection commission.

One possible quibble, Justice Ginsburg was Jewish OTL. Would she then be buried at St. Paul's Cathedral after a church service? Would she not instead have been buried in a fashion respecting Jewish customs?
Whoops :p perhaps an interfaith memorial service at St Pauls? Followed by a private burial.
 
I'm currently working no a Mosaic Earth, and I'm not sure what to take from this TL. America and Australia are mostly full, but the rest of the world is free. I'm currently contemplating Gibraltar and New Ararat; any others you'd suggest?
Also, does anyone have a WorldA map of the world in TTL?
Modest bump. If you've forgotten what a Mosaic Earth is:
Basically, a Mosaic Earth is formed by areas from several different timelines being ISOTed to the same world. It's often used in collaborative shared worlds TLs and scenarios.
I'd ideally like to take the most important, powerful and/or unique regions from TTL.
 
a question. Nepal and the UK were very closely allied otl, and that led to......much instability in nepal......what's going on in the land of the gurkhas right now?
 
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