Hail, Britannia

I'm currently working no a Mosaic Earth, and I'm not sure what to take from this TL. America and Australia are mostly full, but the rest of the world is free. I'm currently contemplating Gibraltar and New Ararat; any others you'd suggest?
Reposting. Also, does anyone have a WorldA map of the world in TTL?
 
I just thought of something-Japan was on the side of the Allies in TTL's WW2, and I don't think China would be fanatical enough to launch suicide attacks against Allied warships. Therefore, it's possible that the word "kamikaze" could retain its original meaning-a stroke of good fortune out of nowhere.
 
I just thought of something-Japan was on the side of the Allies in TTL's WW2, and I don't think China would be fanatical enough to launch suicide attacks against Allied warships. Therefore, it's possible that the word "kamikaze" could retain its original meaning-a stroke of good fortune out of nowhere.
so I doubt we'd still get the cocktail named for it, or at least not the one we know IOTL
 

LeinadB93

Monthly Donor
I just noticed that the Aral sea is the same as OTL, meaning the Soviets had a similar cotton policy in this time.
My assumption with the Aral Sea is better management of the irrigation projects in Central Asia during Communist period means that the sea isn't as depleted by the 1990s as OTL. Then after democratisation refilling projects began (part of the global climate change initatives) which saw the sea level rise and the region be in a much better state environmentally than OTL.

Reposting. Also, does anyone have a WorldA map of the world in TTL?
Not really sure what a Mosaic Earth is...

No WorldA map I'm afraic

I just thought of something-Japan was on the side of the Allies in TTL's WW2, and I don't think China would be fanatical enough to launch suicide attacks against Allied warships. Therefore, it's possible that the word "kamikaze" could retain its original meaning-a stroke of good fortune out of nowhere.
so I doubt we'd still get the cocktail named for it, or at least not the one we know IOTL
Well I didn't know about the original meaning of "kamikaze" so that's interesting. And yes, no kamikaze bombers ITTL mean the word would retain it's meaning.
 
Maine; 2019 legislative election

LeinadB93

Monthly Donor
Finally finished the write up!!! The largest province in New England – “the Pine Tree Province”.

Many thanks to @lord caedus for sharing the electoral base map for Maine from the X-in-Canada series. If you haven’t read that series, check it out!!

Enjoy :)


Maine is a province of New England, bordered by New Hampshire to the west, New Brunswick to the northeast, the Canadian province of Quebec to the north, and the Gulf of Popham, part of the Atlantic Ocean, to the south. The largest province by area, and the third-largest by population, Maine is believed to have been named after former province of the same name in France. The province’s nickname – “the Pine Tree Province” – refers to the extensive forested areas of the province’s interior, and over 80% of the total land area is forested or unclaimed. Officially bilingual, with English and French recognised as official languages by the provincial government, Maine is also home to the largest population of Native Americans in New England.

For thousands of years, indigenous peoples inhabited what is now Maine, and by the time of the first European arrivals the area was dominated by the Algonquian-speaking Wabanaki peoples, including the Abenaki, Passamaquoddy, and Penobscots. Portuguese explorer Estêvão Gomes, sailing in the service of Spain, became the first European to explore and map the coastline of Maine, although they established no settlements. The French were the first Europeans to establish colonies in the area, when a party settled on Saint-Croix Island in 1604, naming the area Acadia, whilst the English founded the Popham Colony in 1607 but it was quickly abandoned. French and English settlers would contest central Maine until the 1750s when the French were defeated in the French and Indian War and ceded the colony of Acadia to Britain. In 1613, a French trading post was established at present-day Castine, which may be the first permanent settlement in New England.

A 1622 colonial land patent first used the name “Maine” to describe the territory between the Merrimack and Kennebec rivers, which was partitioned in 1629 along the Piscataqua River to form New Hampshire in the south and New Somersetshire in the north, in what is now southwestern Maine. Early English attempts to settle the colony were ephemeral and failed, although an early attempt laid the origins for the modern city of Portland. By 1652, the numerous colonial grants and patents had been absorbed into the Massachusetts Bay Colony, which encompassed all of present-day Maine. The province would remain governed by Massachusetts for nearly two hundred years, although brief periods in the 1660s, 70s and 80s saw the short-lived establishment of proprietary colonies which quickly failed. Geographically separated from Massachusetts, the District of Maine was created in 1780 following the granting of home rule to Massachusetts in order to manage the northern counties. Movements for Maine provincehood began as early as 1785, but Maine would remain part of Massachusetts until 15 March 1834, when the Province of Maine was established by royal charter. The northern border with Quebec, and the eastern border with New Brunswick were also set in the same year.

During the 19th century industrialisation took hold across Maine, with the river valleys becoming vital for the province’s lumber industry. Shipbuilding became an important industry, owing to the lumber industry’s transportation needs and the availability of wood and carpenters. Maine’s merchant navy was huge in proportion to its population, with a global reach. Cotton textile manufacturing developed in mills across the province, while fishing and quarrying were also important industries. Like neighbouring New Hampshire, the growing industries drew many French Americans to work and settle in the province, and as of the 2011 census more than 30% of the province’s population claim French ancestry, whilst 20% of the population speak French as their first language. Along with the other New England colonies, Maine took part in the series of conferences that led to the creation of the Commonwealth of New England on 1 October 1866.

Throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the pulp and paper industry spread into Maine although the province remained a largely agricultural province. After the Great Depression the textile and shipbuilding industries began to decline, although the traditional industries of Maine survived, in by the late 20th century they were in decline, with the last heavy industry, pulp and paper, withdrawing. The late 20th century saw a shift in the province’s economy towards tourism and other services-based industries, although Maine remains the poorest province in New England, taking into account its high taxes and living costs. By the 21st century, Maine remains a rural province, with more than 60% of its population living in rural communities. Agriculture and fishing remain important industries, and alongside the lumber and tourism sectors make up most of the provincial economy.


The 2019 Maine legislative election was held on 13 March 2019 to elect, under the first past the post system, the 53 members of the Legislative Assembly. Unique amongst New England’s provinces, three of the seats in Maine’s legislature are elected from the enrolled members of the province’s three recognised First Nations; the Maliseet, the Passamaquoddy, and the Penobscot.

The governing centre-right coalition of the Moderates and the Conservatives, led by incumbent Premier Olympia Snowe and Deputy Premier Peter Cianchette, secured a second majority in the assembly, albeit with a net loss of one seat and an overall decline in the popular voter. Some voters were angered by the decision of the two parties to formalise an electoral pact in this election, with them not standing candidates against each other, and one party standing down in ridings where the other polled better. Although the pact was effective for the Moderates, who gained two seats, many more traditional Conservative voters stayed home in constituencies where there were only Moderate candidates.

The opposition centrist Liberals, under former premier Michel Michaud, failed to capitalise on the decline in the conservative vote, although they only lost one seat. Many young urban voters switched to the centre-left Democrats, who ran on a progressive and socially liberal platform championed by new leader Shenna Bellows. The ecological left-wing Greens almost doubled their share of the popular vote and entered the legislature for the first time, with leader David Slagger winning the Maliseet Tribe’s reserved seat. Following the election, Snowe was reappointed as Premier, whilst Michaud announced his intention to step down as Liberal leader, although it is rumoured he will be appointed to the New England Senate when a vacancy next opens.

 
I am shocked that @LeinadB93 has not covered the masterpiece that is Inspector Spacetime. To remedy this, here's my list of Inspectors ITTL.

1.Leslie French (1962-1965)

2.Christopher Lee (1965-1968)

3.Bob Crane (1969-1973)

4.Donald Sutherland (1973-1980)

5.Glenn Close (1981-1983)

6.Eric Idle (1983-1985)

7.Stephen Fry (1986-1988)

8.Jim Carrey (1999 movie)

9.Chow Yun-fat (2004)

10.Christopher Obi (2005-2009)

11.Travis Richey (2009-2012)

Mark Hamill (The "Unknown Inspector, 2012 50th anniversary special)

12.███████████████████ (2013-2016)

13.Phoebe Waller-Bridge (2017-present)

 
Harrison Ford's version of the Doctor was created retroactively as a previously unseen incarnation known as the "War Doctor", who existed outside of the regular numbering system. Ford's character first appears in the series seven finale, "The Name of the Doctor", as a shadowy figure within the Doctor's timeline, playing opposite the Eleventh Doctor (Chris Hemsworth). The origins of the War Doctor are given in the mini-episode "The Night of the Doctor", where the Eighth Doctor (Alec Baldwin) chooses to regenerate into a warrior to fight in the Time War. Digitally restored footage of Ford from Star Wars was used to make the actor appear younger. The only full appearance of Harrison Ford as the War Doctor was in the 50th anniversary special "The Day of the Doctor" where he appears alongside the Ninth, Tenth and Eleventh Doctors (Jackie Chan, David Tennant and Chris Hemsworth respectively). The reception of Ford's version of the Doctor was generally positive.
Just so you know, the original plan for the 50th anniversary special was to have the Ninth Doctor be the one who fought in the Time War, but since Christopher Eccleston declined to return, the War Doctor was created. Seeing as Jackie Chan apparently returned ITTL, why was there a War Doctor?
 
On 11 September 2001 (“9/11”), the United Empire was struck by a terrorist attack al-Qaeda hijackers commandeered seven airliners to be used in suicide attacks. Two planes struck the twin towers of the World Trade Centre in New York, a third struck the Palace of Westminster in central London and the fourth into the Pentagon in suburban London, killing 4,172 victims. Passengers and crew successfully retook control of two of the three remaining planes, and they crashed in Allegheny, Columbia and West Berkshire, England respectively, whilst air defences brought down the seventh plane outside of Fredericksburg when it targeted the Triskelion. In response, Prime Minister George W. Bush announced a “War on Terror”, and in October the United Empire and CDP invaded Somalia to end the civil war, which had provided a haven for al-Qaeda and its leader Osama bin Laden, and eliminate the alleged chemical weapons in the country. In the Arabian Peninsula, tensions between Nejd and Hasa erupted into war over control of vital oil reserves and unresolved border tensions and the Saudis support for Islamic extremists, forcing British involvement in the region. Despite initial successes in both theatres, the continued overseas deployment of the British military fuelled international protests and led to the collapse of the Bush government under domestic and international pressure.
Considering today's date, do you plan to shed some more light on TTL's version of 9/11?
 
@LeinadB93, in a previous post you said that Neuchatel remained a Principality, but who rules it? Since from 1707 until 1848 (when the monarchy was ended in the principality), the Prince of Neuchatel was also the King of Prussia, so does it remain like that or other protestant branch of the family ended up with the title? (or since the PODs started before America remained British, did the House of Orléans-Longueville not become extinct, and if so, did they at some point become protestants to match better the state's religious demographics?)
 

LeinadB93

Monthly Donor
It’d be cool to see a map of what different European nations colonised.
I might be able to wip something up this weekend.

Who represents Maine in the Imperial Parliament?
Susan Collins from the Imperial Progressive Conservative Association.

Just so you know, the original plan for the 50th anniversary special was to have the Ninth Doctor be the one who fought in the Time War, but since Christopher Eccleston declined to return, the War Doctor was created. Seeing as Jackie Chan apparently returned ITTL, why was there a War Doctor?
Chan was originally unable to commit to returning to the role, so the War Doctor was created. However a last minute scheduling adjustment enabled Chan to return, and the Ninth Doctor was written into the 50th anniversary special as suceeding the War Doctor.
 
Top