Hail, Britannia

Seeing the recent protests in Spain and the fact that nowadays it seems that monarchy is always under some sort of scrutiny and skepticism due to the most recent superpowers being republics, I have a question:

Since a monarchy is the world's main superpower in the TL, does that mean that there is something of an opposite on it? With republics being under scrutiny and a minor but not unnoticeable percentage of the population supporting an end to them and the establishment of monarchies?
 
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LeinadB93

Monthly Donor
So is this the equivalent of MERS?
An interesting post, what caused the outbreak ?
What are you talking about? Is there a post I missed?
It seems that the post was deleted.
My bad... felt it was a bit insensitive given the current stituation...

Seeing the recent protests in Spain and the fact that nowadays it seems that monarchy is always under some sort of scrutiny and skepticism due to the most recent superpowers being republics, I have a question:

Since a monarchy is the world's main superpower in the TL, does that mean that there is something of an opposite on it? With republics being under scrutiny and a minor but not unnoticeable percentage of the population supporting an end to them and the establishment of monarchies?
Oh definitely! There's real skepticism in monarchies towards republicans (and their associated movements), though more specifically towards "presidential" (OTL USA) republics than parliamentary ones. TTL's history is very much skewed against presidential republics as most resulted in dictators or dictatorial tendencies. So its probable that most republics have small monarchist movements, although some are much stronger and even mainstream.

For example; Texas has a small monarchist movement favouring becoming a Commonwealth realm, but generally limits itself to cultural activites promoting ties to Britain and the Commonwealth. Rhineland when it gained independence proposed crowning its own king, but couldn't settle on a candidate. Poland regularly debates restoring the monarchy, and it's likely to happen in the next decade.

This is not canon, but I have this to visualize the enlargement of the EU based on this.
View attachment 569958
Brilliant :) I have a few amendments to borders but otherwise good work :)

Might I humbly promise this monstrosity get built.

Tempting :p
 
2018 British imperial election New

LeinadB93

Monthly Donor
To celebrate the Fifth Anniversary of the series, and to thank you all for your continued interest and support, I present to you the 2018 British imperial election:



The 2018 British imperial election was held on 19 April 2018 to elect, under the mixed member proportional representation system, the 868 members of the Imperial House of Commons. 434 members are elected from single-seat constituencies, with each Home Nation guaranteed at least one seat, with the other 434 seats being allocated to closed party lists as "top up" seats based on each party's share of the popular vote. The early election was called after several crises weakened the governing Social Democratic-Liberal-Green coalition.

The Party of Imperial Social Democrats and Progressives, led by incumbent Prime Minister Sylvia Lim of Singapore, were damaged by several high profile crises; the disastrous response in the Caribbean to the recent spate of hurricanes, an ongoing funding scandal in the Work Projects Agency, and the allegations of "favours-for-access". Their coalition partners, the Alliance of Imperial Liberals and Reformists and the Imperial Greens, led by Michael Bennet of Missouri and Elizabeth May of New England respectively, largely distanced themselves from the Social Democrats, with Bennet pledging to renegotiate a new coalition agreement if the SDP remained the largest party. However many in the Liberal backbenches were publicly critical of the Lim government's actions on a number of issues, while the Greens were buoyed by the numerous environmental initiatives they had successfully implemented. In the final count, both the Social Democrats and the Liberals lost seats, and the former was reduced to the second-largest party in the House. Despite the three parties collectively having 439 seats, enough to form a slim majority, Bennet, under pressure from high-profile Liberals, pledged on election night to not form a new coalition. Lim announced her resignation as Prime Minister on election night, advising the Queen-Empress that she was unable to form government, and pledging to remain as leader until a replacement was chosen.

The opposition Imperial Conservatives, Democrats and Unionists, under new leader Luis Fortuño of Puerto Rico, made a gain of 38 seats and rose to become the largest party in the House following strong performances in England and North America. Platform pledges to reduce government waste, as well as troop commitments in West Africa, increased infrastructure development in the southern American dominions and improved NHS funding, and to complete the accession of Accra to the Union were well received. The party also benefited from Fortuño's personal popularity, with his fluency in Spanish, English and French lending itself to campaigning across the Empire and his approachable nature and sympathy for the plight of his home island after the hurricane crisis. Although the Conservatives were unable to form a majority government, Fortuño was able to negotiate a confidence and supply agreement with the Liberals and Progressive Conservatives, and was invited by Elizabeth II to form a government as the 35th Imperial Prime Minister, and the first native Spanish-speaker to hold the office.

British Heritage, the right-wing, socially conservative nationalist party, under Sarah Palin of Oregon, largely reversed their loses over the previous decade, although pundits attributed this more to a general swing to the right in British politics than to any ideological breakthrough, as Heritage had run a relatively unimpressive campaign. The broad-tent Alliance of Regions lost two seats but were generally credited with running a positive campaign, and saw only a slight decline in their share of the vote. The moderate conservative and socially liberal Imperial Progressive Conservative Association, led by John Tory of Canada, held steady from the previous election, continuing to espouse a "common sense conservative" platform of balanced budgets and government reform. The Libertarian Party of Great Britannia went into the election divided between the left and right factions of the party, with Marie Ruwart of the Ohio Country still leading the party due to the lack of an acceptable "unifying" successor, and ran an uninspiring and disappointing campaign, which lacked direction and resulted in the party losing 2 seats, despite the party taking the Southwest Georgia and Wiregrass constituency. The left-wing Imperial Socialist Labour Party saw a slight decline at this election, losing two seats including the shock defeat of leader Donald Ramotar of the West Indies in his seat of Guyana.

The right-wing populist People's Alliance for Democracy, under long time leader Nigel Farage of England, gained four seats at this election, although Farage failed once again to win a constituency seat. Opposition to increased immigration and the accession of Accra to the Union were key campaign pledges, but the party lacked any real concrete economic platforms. Team Trump, the right-wing political vehicle established by businessman and Imperial Councillor Donald Trump, again failed to enter the Imperial Parliament, being excluded from the leader debates and many supporters switched to the Populists. The British Republican Movement had both MIPs and co-leaders re-elected to the House.

 
Hmm, a good mix apart from New Zealand which seems to be dominated by the Conservatives, I wonder why blowback from a previous election maybe or the overall shift to the right as was mentioned above.?
 
Great to see the 2018 election! Looking forward to see who'll be the next SDP leader.

Looking at the map, it's pretty interesting to see that the Republicans hold a seat in Ohio of all places. And I assume the Regionalists in Ireland and Cornwall are Sinn Fein-types and Mebyon Kernow respectively?

Anyway, what are the differences between Farage's Populist Party and the Heritage Party?
 
On paper the government seems very weak. Not sure about how things are actually going, but I feel like once they get past very popular items the Conservatives will not be able to move legislation through the house, and there could be major contention over the budget. The Liberals are probably just be waiting for one big mistake from the government to force an election with a confidence vote, so long as they feel good about their chances in an early election. Reminds me of a certain real life election in recent years, although the government won bigly in the election after that one...
 
To celebrate the Fifth Anniversary of the series, and to thank you all for your continued interest and support, I present to you the 2018 British imperial election:



The 2018 British imperial election was held on 19 April 2018 to elect, under the mixed member proportional representation system, the 868 members of the Imperial House of Commons. 434 members are elected from single-seat constituencies, with each Home Nation guaranteed at least one seat, with the other 434 seats being allocated to closed party lists as "top up" seats based on each party's share of the popular vote. The early election was called after several crises weakened the governing Social Democratic-Liberal-Green coalition.

The Party of Imperial Social Democrats and Progressives, led by incumbent Prime Minister Sylvia Lim of Singapore, were damaged by several high profile crises; the disastrous response in the Caribbean to the recent spate of hurricanes, an ongoing funding scandal in the Work Projects Agency, and the allegations of "favours-for-access". Their coalition partners, the Alliance of Imperial Liberals and Reformists and the Imperial Greens, led by Michael Bennet of Missouri and Elizabeth May of New England respectively, largely distanced themselves from the Social Democrats, with Bennet pledging to renegotiate a new coalition agreement if the SDP remained the largest party. However many in the Liberal backbenches were publicly critical of the Lim government's actions on a number of issues, while the Greens were buoyed by the numerous environmental initiatives they had successfully implemented. In the final count, both the Social Democrats and the Liberals lost seats, and the former was reduced to the second-largest party in the House. Despite the three parties collectively having 439 seats, enough to form a slim majority, Bennet, under pressure from high-profile Liberals, pledged on election night to not form a new coalition. Lim announced her resignation as Prime Minister on election night, advising the Queen-Empress that she was unable to form government, and pledging to remain as leader until a replacement was chosen.

The opposition Imperial Conservatives, Democrats and Unionists, under new leader Luis Fortuño of Puerto Rico, made a gain of 38 seats and rose to become the largest party in the House following strong performances in England and North America. Platform pledges to reduce government waste, as well as troop commitments in West Africa, increased infrastructure development in the southern American dominions and improved NHS funding, and to complete the accession of Accra to the Union were well received. The party also benefited from Fortuño's personal popularity, with his fluency in Spanish, English and French lending itself to campaigning across the Empire and his approachable nature and sympathy for the plight of his home island after the hurricane crisis. Although the Conservatives were unable to form a majority government, Fortuño was able to negotiate a confidence and supply agreement with the Liberals and Progressive Conservatives, and was invited by Elizabeth II to form a government as the 35th Imperial Prime Minister, and the first native Spanish-speaker to hold the office.

British Heritage, the right-wing, socially conservative nationalist party, under Sarah Palin of Oregon, largely reversed their loses over the previous decade, although pundits attributed this more to a general swing to the right in British politics than to any ideological breakthrough, as Heritage had run a relatively unimpressive campaign. The broad-tent Alliance of Regions lost two seats but were generally credited with running a positive campaign, and saw only a slight decline in their share of the vote. The moderate conservative and socially liberal Imperial Progressive Conservative Association, led by John Tory of Canada, held steady from the previous election, continuing to espouse a "common sense conservative" platform of balanced budgets and government reform. The Libertarian Party of Great Britannia went into the election divided between the left and right factions of the party, with Marie Ruwart of the Ohio Country still leading the party due to the lack of an acceptable "unifying" successor, and ran an uninspiring and disappointing campaign, which lacked direction and resulted in the party losing 2 seats, despite the party taking the Southwest Georgia and Wiregrass constituency. The left-wing Imperial Socialist Labour Party saw a slight decline at this election, losing two seats including the shock defeat of leader Donald Ramotar of the West Indies in his seat of Guyana.

The right-wing populist People's Alliance for Democracy, under long time leader Nigel Farage of England, gained four seats at this election, although Farage failed once again to win a constituency seat. Opposition to increased immigration and the accession of Accra to the Union were key campaign pledges, but the party lacked any real concrete economic platforms. Team Trump, the right-wing political vehicle established by businessman and Imperial Councillor Donald Trump, again failed to enter the Imperial Parliament, being excluded from the leader debates and many supporters switched to the Populists. The British Republican Movement had both MIPs and co-leaders re-elected to the House.

I did not know christmas was in the middle of the summer
 
This is, of course, currently non-canon
Looking at the map, here's my estimate for the number of constituencies by party and by dominion.
It's interesting to see just how well the PCs did in the constituencies. Would it be because their candidates rely more on personal popularity, or just because people tend to vote less for them in the party-list than in the constituency part?
I'd guess that, while Donald Ramotar lost his constituency, he would still elected on the party list.
(also, I imagine the TV channels trying to guess the full seats counts using party-list vote estimates from the seats of the previous dominions and from exit polls, as the official party-list vote count isn't revealed until the last polls closings) When do you think the TV channels called the PM race for Luis Fortuño?
1596148401533.png
 

LeinadB93

Monthly Donor
Hmm, a good mix apart from New Zealand which seems to be dominated by the Conservatives, I wonder why blowback from a previous election maybe or the overall shift to the right as was mentioned above.?
Unpopularity of the incumbent SDP (both Imperial and National) as well as a right-ward shift.

Looking at the map, it's pretty interesting to see that the Republicans hold a seat in Ohio of all places. And I assume the Regionalists in Ireland and Cornwall are Sinn Fein-types and Mebyon Kernow respectively?
Yep - West Connecticut is one of the more Republican areas of North America. Yes the regionalists in Ireland and Cornwall and Sinn Fein and Mebyon Kernow respectively.

Anyway, what are the differences between Farage's Populist Party and the Heritage Party?
The Populists are right-wing populists, economically liberal combined with British nationalism, national conservatism and general scepticism of international integration.

Heritage are a Christian right conservative party, espousing fiscal, paleo and social conservatism.

The Populists are like UKIP, while Heritage are like the US Constitution Party.

On paper the government seems very weak. Not sure about how things are actually going, but I feel like once they get past very popular items the Conservatives will not be able to move legislation through the house, and there could be major contention over the budget. The Liberals are probably just be waiting for one big mistake from the government to force an election with a confidence vote, so long as they feel good about their chances in an early election. Reminds me of a certain real life election in recent years, although the government won bigly in the election after that one...
Fortuño is a moderate and he's proven successful at building a consensus behind most of his policies - generally being supported by the Liberals (and occasionally the SDP). Though he has alienated the traditional coalition partners of the Conservatives - Heritage and the Libertarians.

You are right in that the government is balanced on a knife edge... one wrong move and it could all come tumbling down. However, the Liberals are the real "kingmakers" here. Bennet could decide to bring down the government and force an early election (1) or they could switch and form a coalition government with the Social Democrats (2). Both options have their issues:

1 - the Liberals have consistently lost seats in the last 3 elections, and many opinion polls predict they would drop further in an election held this year.
2 - many high-profile Liberals (ex-cabinet members mainly) oppose a new coalition agreement with the Social Democrats given how they perceive it to have reduced them to third place in the House.

Bennet kind of shot himself in the foot by refusing to consider a new coalition agreement in 2018, and the Social Democrats are wise to him after it emerged Lim offered to resign as PM in 2020 if the Liberals had formed a new coalition government. A fact the new SDP shadow cabinet have remembered.

Four possibilities:
1. Fortuño screws up on something so badly that the SDP call a vote of confidence and the Liberals don't back him - leading to an early election. (possible)
2. Bennet throws caution to the wind, ignoring the naysayers in his part, and calls a vote of confidence against the Conservatives. (possible, but unlikely)
3. Bennet is replaced as party leader, who negotiates a coalition agreement with the SDP and other parties to form a majority. (highly unlikely).
4. Bennet remains as party leader, and the C&S agreement remains in place to the 2023 election. (most likely)
 

LeinadB93

Monthly Donor
Looking at the map, here's my estimate for the number of constituencies by party and by dominion.
Don't have my data in front of me. But pretty accurate :)

It's interesting to see just how well the PCs did in the constituencies. Would it be because their candidates rely more on personal popularity, or just because people tend to vote less for them in the party-list than in the constituency part?
You'll notice the PCs do well where they have a strong local affiliate (Missouri, Canada, New England). So it's combination of regional variations and local popularity.

I'd guess that, while Donald Ramotar lost his constituency, he would still elected on the party list.
Yes he would. By convention all party leaders are the first name on their party list.

(also, I imagine the TV channels trying to guess the full seats counts using party-list vote estimates from the seats of the previous dominions and from exit polls, as the official party-list vote count isn't revealed until the last polls closings) When do you think the TV channels called the PM race for Luis Fortuño?
Yes they probably would. I imagine that TV channels would call the race for largest party in favour of the Conservatives after the polls closed in Columbia, Carolina and the rest of the eastern seaboard of North America.
 
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