Good King George - A Republican Britain and a Monarchist America

Would you like to see

  • More of the United Commonwealth

    Votes: 12 8.5%
  • United Provinces of America

    Votes: 84 59.6%
  • Patagonia

    Votes: 15 10.6%
  • European Affairs

    Votes: 30 21.3%

  • Total voters
    141
It seems that after the restoration they will do referendums with all monarchs.
If thats the case will they make referendums for the restoration of the monarchy every now and then if France is a Republic?
Because going back & forth between the two systems would be a very french thing
 
I can't think of an OTL instance where there was a monarchy continuation referendum between the death of the monarch and the coronation of the heir. I like it, it's quite original.
And yeah, when a new constitution is about to be adopted by the republic, there could be a republic continuation referendum as well, @Aluma.
 
I love it! Why is there a referendum on the future of the monarchy in France? Is the new emperor so controversial?
It seems that after the restoration they will do referendums with all monarchs.

It's a quirk of the Imperial constitution of 1949 to appease republicans, which was required given how close the 46 referendum was. Every time a new Emperor ascends the throne, a vote is held on the continuation of the Monarchy. While there had been some thought on not holding it, given how enormously popular the old war hero Napoleon V had been, the Republicans demanded it, and the courts backed them up.

So the Vote will be held.

If thats the case will they make referendums for the restoration of the monarchy every now and then if France is a Republic?
Because going back & forth between the two systems would be a very french thing
I can't think of an OTL instance where there was a monarchy continuation referendum between the death of the monarch and the coronation of the heir. I like it, it's quite original.
And yeah, when a new constitution is about to be adopted by the republic, there could be a republic continuation referendum as well, @Aluma.

As per the agreement in 1949, in the case of the formation of a Republic, the people would be, every 25 years, afforded a chance to return to a monarchy. With an agreement that after 100 years, should it be rejected four times, the republic would be viewed as "Having gained the consent of the people" and be maintained without future votes unless authorised by the Parliament

Also, why did the far right lead a coup against the Bonaparte dynasty?

Napoleon IV was

A. Quite a liberal man, so widely disdained by the far right.
B, Blamed for France's effective defeat in the stalemate that was the First World War.
C. Blamed for the forced withdrawal from the Rhineland in 1924 after the intervention to aid the toppled King of Westphalia

Couple that with the start of an economic crisis that year, the Monarchy was deeply unpopular, and the far right was on the rise. Seeking to "Undo the damage done by the Bonaparte's."
 
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Provinces of America.
VKr0aTi.png


Have your say!
Oh shit. The King is hot. Is the fucking David Gandy.

I feel my bisexuality triggering.
 
Wait, have the Bonapartes intermarries with the Bourbons? How did that happen, did the Bourbons give up their claims to the French Crown? It seems they also adopted the naming conventions of the Kings of France.
 
The 48 Years' War New
The Great Conflagration

"The fact your media, including this broadcaster, still entertains the idea that the conflicts that began with the Fashoda War and ended with the Congress of New York were some... series of fully connected events is idiotic. From the start, it was a fantasy concocted by American propagandists during the war. For example, my ancestor, Napoleon IV, did everything he could to prevent the outbreak of the First World War, and yet he is forced to bear the indignation to his memory of the second Napoleonic wars!"

Louie XVIII interviewed by the ABC shortly after his unsanctioned marriage to Princess Elizabeth, the Queen's Sister.


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As per the agreement in 1949, in the case of the formation of a Republic, the people would be, every 25 years, afforded a chance to return to a monarchy. With an agreement that after 100 years, should it be rejected four times, the republic would be viewed as "Having gained the consent of the people" and be maintained without future votes unless authorised by the Parliament
would the same apply after four successive referendums in the favor of the monarchy?

edit: also wow, so WWII here lasts a full 9 years- that would be devastating
 
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That is a nasty early 20th century. If my count is right, there's 18-20 major conflicts over the course of sixty years, capped off by WWII/Arabian War. In terms of casualties, how bad were these various wars for the powers involved in them?
 
Wait, have the Bonapartes intermarries with the Bourbons? How did that happen, did the Bourbons give up their claims to the French Crown? It seems they also adopted the naming conventions of the Kings of France.

A branch of the Bourbons married into the family, the current King's mother was a Bourbon. However, the recognition of the old order was something pushed by Charles XI as a part of national reconstruction efforts to stress the continuity of the French state through history. When he became Emperor, he was simply Charles and changed it to XI in 1955.

would the same apply after four successive referendums in the favor of the monarchy?

For the Monarchy, the Republic provision will go to rest after the next vote if the people vote to retain the Monarchy.

edit: also wow, so WWII here lasts a full 9 years- that would be devastating
That is a nasty early 20th century. If my count is right, there's 18-20 major conflicts over the course of sixty years, capped off by WWII/Arabian War. In terms of casualties, how bad were these various wars for the powers involved in them?

WWII was a living nightmare, even more so than the one faced in OTL. With the added length and bitter fighting in China. The death toll will be higher. And that's before we even get into the lengthy bombing campaigns launched by France and Britain against each other and the horror of China's Great Siege of Japan.

I'll have an exact number when I do the Infobox for it next week. But to say that the era was devastating would be the understatement of the century.
 
BBC News 26/11/2022 - Lesser Sunda: Islands reject Independence from the United Kingdom New
BBC News 26/11/2022 - Lesser Sunda: Islands reject Independence from the United Kingdom

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The Vote.PNG
 
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The best part of these sorts of posts are not the main stories but rather the tidbits on the sides:
- No 3. Does this mean America is nearing victory because that seems rather idealistic of them
- No 6. Didn’t Thatcher end apartheid in South Africa as was explained before after the last current events post?
- No 10. It appears the protests in Germany have succeeded.
 
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