"God Ænd Mihn Riht" An Anglo-Saxon England under the Godwinson house.

¿What will be the fate of wales?

  • Independent.

    Votes: 9 11.7%
  • Independent but with Anglish influence.

    Votes: 25 32.5%
  • Part of Angland.

    Votes: 43 55.8%

  • Total voters
    77
  • Poll closed .
One thing I will strongly suggest for this TL concerns language.
Essentially it's best not to mix languages from different time periods. E.g. Modern Welsh alongside Old English is a no-no etc.
Where your articles use names, be internally consistent in the versions you use and limit to one or two language versions.
Where an ATL language exists think about its development and the spelling it uses. For example the title of the thread is oddly spelled for a descendant of Old English ("mhin" is particularly egregious!).
 
One thing I will strongly suggest for this TL concerns language.
Essentially it's best not to mix languages from different time periods. E.g. Modern Welsh alongside Old English is a no-no etc.
Where your articles use names, be internally consistent in the versions you use and limit to one or two language versions.
Where an ATL language exists think about its development and the spelling it uses. For example the title of the thread is oddly spelled for a descendant of Old English ("mhin" is particularly egregious!).
Thanks for the advice, I am doing the best I can with the limited resources i have.
 
Essentially it's best not to mix languages from different time periods. E.g. Modern Welsh alongside Old English is a no-no etc.
Where your articles use names, be internally consistent in the versions you use and limit to one or two language versions.
So i only need to germanize English words even further.
 
I know, but I always listen it and sounds Mhin to me, maybe is more a pronunciation problem or I hear bad.
Probably the former, the two bs in Bob are pronounced differently enough that Bhob would be an accurate representation in another language. The issue is that they're considered pronunciation of the same letter and different spelling isn't needed to differentiate Bob from Bhob. Ditto with Min and Mhin.
Mihn in the other hand is a perfectly explainable standard spelling to show the long vowel/diphthong if we assume h loses its pronunciation next to consonants as in OTL (compare Right and Riht)
 
Probably the former, the two bs in Bob are pronounced differently enough that Bhob would be an accurate representation in another language. The issue is that they're considered pronunciation of the same letter and different spelling isn't needed to differentiate Bob from Bhob. Ditto with Min and Mhin.
Mihn in the other hand is a perfectly explainable standard spelling to show the long vowel/diphthong if we assume h loses its pronunciation next to consonants as in OTL (compare Right and Riht)
In Spanish "h" is mute all the time like “p” in psychology.
 
Chapter XII The Eagle of Aquitaine
Chapter XII.

The Eagle of Aquitaine.

"After the dissolution of the French Royal Couple after the crusade, Eleanor searched a husband worthy of her, an it came in form of a German Prince."

Theobald of Frisia, medieval chronist.


After the dissolution of the marriage, Eleanor passed two years single until she founded an appropriate husband, the Duke of Swabia, Frederick Von Hohenstaufen.

This displeased King Louis inmensely, but it was nothing to do, unless a friendly assassination attempt, that failed miserably.

Their first son was born in 1150 and was called Frederick like his father, while he grew he demonstrated a severe resilience and physical strength.

The two spouses were happy together and helped each other to govern their respective lands, making an almost invincible duo.

In 1156 Eleanor gave birth to two girls, one was called Eleanor and the other one Mathilda, Mathilda married with the Sicilian king, William II, the next year she also give birth, this time to a boy, Richard.

Eleanor died in 1167 after giving birth to her seventh child, Johan, who died some months later, both deaths devastated her family and even the Kaiser, who with the years fell in love with her, their son Frederick became the most powerful men in France after the king.

This decease, although sad, was convenient in a political way: His son possessed land in France and was far more popular than the king, not to mention the amount of support he can receive from the Empire and the political determination of Barbarossa to unify what was the Carolingian Empire by denying the legitimacy of the Capets and claiming to be descendent of Charlemagne himself, but the appropriate time will come.

Going down to the Mediterranean Sea, the matrimony between Mathilda Von Hohenstaufen and William was not the happiest one, but at least it wasn’t a complete misery, they had healthy offsprings, three in number, William, Sybilla and Eleanor, William II died in 1190 and William III reign was marvelous, but that is another story.

When Barbarossa finally died in 1199 of incontinence, his reign saw finally the consolidation of imperial power over the nobility, the instauration of a hereditary succession system and the reduction of power and independence for every noble and region in the empire.

If he realized what happened decades later after his death because of his marriage with Eleanor...
 
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Eleanor of Aquitaine dies in 1177 giving birth to a child at the age of c. 55

I think her having John IOTL at the age of 44 in 1166 was a rather big stroke of luck.

It also means a huge gap between 6th child and 7th of almost 20 years. Did you mean her to die in 1757?

You also refer to "the two husbands" - did you mean Eleanor and Frederick, or Luis and Frederick? If the latter, then the fact Luis has just tried to have him murdered would cast doubt on their being happy together. Do you mean Eleanor and Frederick?
 
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