"God Ænd Mihn Riht" An Anglo-Saxon England under the Godwinson house.

¿What will be the fate of wales?

  • Independent.

    Votes: 9 11.7%
  • Independent but with Anglish influence.

    Votes: 25 32.5%
  • Part of Angland.

    Votes: 43 55.8%

  • Total voters
    77
  • Poll closed .
The Start of All.
After the Battle of Stamford Bridge Harold believed that his throne was secured, but a rumor said that the Norman duke would come to claim his "right" to the English throne, but the invasion never came...

The Norman duke and his army were sunk, or ended up in other places like Frisia, after a massive storm. William and his boat ended up in Brittany, but he was severely injured and died in January of 1067, being remembered as William the Drowned, leaving Normandy in the hands of his son Robert.

With this, the peace of England and Harold's security on the throne were ensured, this is how the golden age of the Godwinson would start, or at least he thought...
 
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Most surviving Saxon England stories start with a different outcome to Hastings, butterflying it away altogether is a pretty original PoD. 5 groats says the English call the storm a miracle :-D
 
Interesting a surviving Godwin England that lacks a Battle of Hastings is original. Can't wait to see what happens to Robert and his siblings!
 
Most surviving Saxon England stories start with a different outcome to Hastings, butterflying it away altogether is a pretty original PoD. 5 groats says the English call the storm a miracle :-D
With "William the drowed", well, rekted by a big storm Harold and his pals would say it was a help from heaven.
 
Most surviving Saxon England stories start with a different outcome to Hastings, butterflying it away altogether is a pretty original PoD. 5 groats says the English call the storm a miracle :-D
Would they though? The Battle was close OTL despite the English at a lower level thanks to Stamford Bridge, the turning point being a mistake that might not get repeated in a rerun. So I think they might even see it as a miracle for the Normans: they lucked out not having to face the English in battle.
 
Would they though? The Battle was close OTL despite the English at a lower level thanks to Stamford Bridge, the turning point being a mistake that might not get repeated in a rerun. So I think they might even see it as a miracle for the Normans: they lucked out not having to face the English in battle.

Maybe differing interpretations is part of the Anglo-Norman rivalry.
 
interesting. I would assume Angland, once its secured briish domion, will be more or less competing with denmark or the HRE's possesions in the low countries for the north sea?
 
interesting. I would assume Angland, once its secured briish domion, will be more or less competing with denmark or the HRE's possesions in the low countries for the north sea?
They will compete for North Sea dominion first with Denmark, after winning some battles the dutch will be nervous and another competition will start.
 
Chapter I Blood Ties
Chapter I.

Blood ties.

In 1067, Gunhild of Wessex, daughter of the king, married Håkan, prince of Swede and brother of king Halsten, creating an alliance with Sweden. This wasn’t exactly helpful, but could become of great importance when the Swedes stabilize their nation.

But not everything was happiness and celebration, Godwin, the eldest son of Harold, fell ill during the party and died in April of the same year, making his young brother Eadmund the heir to the throne.

"His death devastated the royal family, which was very united, leaving a vacuum that was never filled again in the heart of his parents..."
- Wilhelm Von Schwarzenherz, Professor of history at Vienna University.

Eadmund lamented the death of his brother, especially because he feared the royal responsibilities and considered himself unprepared for his new task, fortunately he was still a teenager, meaning that he had time to improve.

The education of the princes was in hands of the king and some of the most wise men in the country, Eadmund had an exceptional talent in the art of war and sword combat, while Magnus was the intellectual and artistic one, he was so intelligent that memorized all the books of St Gregory the Great.

Eadmund was betrothed to Emma, the sister of the king of France.

On the other hand, the brothers of the king grew in both wealth and ambition, seeking to expand their respective domains they entered into disputes with the earl of Mercia and the king. Girth received the Earldom of Northumbria after a plague eliminated the earl and Leofwine received more land at expense of local landlords.

Edwin, the Earl of Mercia, was the most powerful vassal in the kingdom and was unmarried, so the king betrothed his other daughter, Æthelthryth, born in late 1066, to him in 1069.

In 1070 Eadmund and Emma finally married, a modest celebration was done to avoid another tragedy, something that offended the king of France in a significant way.
 
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King Harold II.
 
With a marriage in Sweden already, perhaps Anglish trade interests will emerge in the Baltic and northern Germany? Certainly the Danes will be a problem and diplomatic steps to contain them would be useful idea
 
With a marriage in Sweden already, perhaps Anglish trade interests will emerge in the Baltic and northern Germany? Certainly the Danes will be a problem and diplomatic steps to contain them would be useful idea
I can see and Anglish prince/princess married with someone important in the HRE, then with Sweden clap the danish.

Maybe they try to get a chunk of land the Baltic.
 
I imagine the commercial interests will be centered on timber, wax and possibly rye and wheat alongside amber and furs, if the alliance endures until XIII-XIV centuries we may see conflicts with the hanseatic league.
 
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