Germany focuses on the Western Front in 1915

Let's say, that Germany doesn't have to reinforce the Eastern Front, as Austria-Hungary manages to withstand the Russians with minimal German presence.
Serbia is not a problem either, while Italy doesn't join the war.

Without the need of diverting forces elsewhere, what could be the German plans on the Western Front in 1915? Could Verdun be a thing earlier? What about the Entente plans? Would there be still a Gallipoli Campaign? Anything else?

I'm looking forward to your answers!
 
Quite a few developments occurred in 1915 that had a direct bearing on 1916 and Verdun, including the triangularisation of divisions and Falkenhayen's dislike of Hindy and Ludy as well as tactical experience.

However, I think that even if AH holds its own in 1914 the Germans have stalled in the west and would went to put in effort in the East where the tactical opportunities are much greater.
 

BlondieBC

Banned
I thin we had a thread on this a few weeks ago. The same leaders will make the 1915 call ITTL as the 1916 call IOTL. Falkenhayn explained his decisions, and it I think it give the choices. You want a bulge where you can attack from our sides. You want a place you can rapidly move troops to. Belfort and Verdun were the choice in 1916. Flanders had bad flooding. Without the Flooding, you also have the Ypres bulge. If this bulge is taken and a little bit more ground, you can bring the heavy artillery on to the ports the English are using. IMO, the likely choices in 1915 are in Order.

  • Ypres,
  • Verdun
  • Belfort
  • The join of the French and English lines. Try to split the forces.
 
Falkenhayn had wanted to undertake a major offensive in the West in the spring of 1915, and it was only the necessity of action to save the Austro-Hungarian position which prevented this. In early March, initial proposals came from 6th and 1st Armies for offensives on either side of Arras and east of Soissons respectively. 11th Army had been created to lead this offensive, and at the end of March Seeckt, as 11th Army Chief of Staff, submitted a proposal for an offensive along a 25km stretch of the front from just south of Arras to just north of Albert. Seeckt's reasoning was that the sector was closest to the coast, was less well-defended, the advance would be partially shielded by the Somme River to the south, and that the area behind the French front line was less developed, making for fewer defensive positions if the Germans achieved the desired breakthrough. However, Seeckt's plan also required greater forces than Falkenhayn had available. As far as I can tell, further planning stopped when 11th Army was ordered East in early April.
 
It depends heavily on how Austria Hungary is able to defend itself

Is it:

Fairly close to otl except in the winter of 1914 Austria just scrapes by and defends better against Russia

Or

Austria does better in 1914 due to better organisation (very plausible)


If it’s the second option the Austrians could do some damage against Russia even without German support.

If it’s first option an offensive to relieve Galician territory lost would still be needed
 
It depends heavily on how Austria Hungary is able to defend itself

Is it:

Fairly close to otl except in the winter of 1914 Austria just scrapes by and defends better against Russia

Or

Austria does better in 1914 due to better organisation (very plausible)


If it’s the second option the Austrians could do some damage against Russia even without German support.

If it’s first option an offensive to relieve Galician territory lost would still be needed
Tbh, I'm working on a TL, where A-H does MUCH better, than OTL, because of different pre-war developments in domestic affairs.

Therefore in the war, there are 5 A-H and 2 German armies on the Eastern Front by the end of 1914. The frontline is at Gnila Lipa-Bug-Kholm-Lublin-Odera line, but the Russians still control most of Masovia including Warsaw. There's still Tannenberg, but the Russian 4th and 5th armies are also badly beaten.

By the end of the year, in Serbia, the more or less intact Serb army retreated to Sandjak and Kosovo after 3 successful Austro-Hungarian campaigns and the Bulgarian entry to the war.
 
Top