From Exile to Triumph: a Western Roman Timeline

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: Before 1900' started by Flavius Iulius Nepos, Jun 7, 2018.

Loading...
  1. Wolttaire Kicked

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2018
    How will they divide it up
     
    Flavius Iulius Nepos likes this.
  2. RyuDrago Italian? Yes, but also Roman

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2010
    Location:
    Italy
    The noticeable temporal jump, without evident notable events in a decade aside the death of Theodoric is apparently a sign of peace for the West like for the East and of apparent stabilization of the Empires as for the Roman-Barbarian realms, which is fine of course.

    The Empire got a great victory, so far, now we will see if and would be consolidated and in which direction - pushing towards Numidia, or focusing over Sardinia and Corsica (both cases may not be so easily as Numidia could fall in the hands of Maurs and Berbers and cause if not overextension some logistic strain at least or endemic border wars, and the islands may become haven of Vandalic resistance and pirate raids), but I wonder now which kind of domino effect the war seem to have started... I have a first guess but we'll see.

    Western Rome is becoming more and more the China of Europe TTL; Eastern Rome so far is still going OTL more or less so is more a fate suspended to the future.
     
    Tarabas and Flavius Iulius Nepos like this.
  3. Flavius Iulius Nepos Emperor with the support of the East

    Joined:
    May 30, 2018
    Location:
    Near the colony of Ateste, Venetia et Histria
    They are not going to divide the kingdom, at least not with the Eastern Romans.
    Marcianus not only need to deal with the Gelimer and his brother but also with the same enemy that threatened the Vandal kingdom so far. The use of diplomacy could help him stabilize the Diocese but like OTL the first years of the reconquered territory are going to be really difficult. Then we will also have to confront with other problems such as local unrest and revolt, the plague, the invasion of new people and more immediately the reaction of the Romano-barbarian kingdoms to this aggression by Rome against the Vandals. Soon we will be able to talk about an empire under siege. There is also the religious aspect that still need to be addressed especially in the east but we shouldn't forget the relation between the Romans and the conquered Arian population. Just because the Vandals have been defeated on the field doesn't mean that they can't cause anymore problem. There are also some positive aspects about this war: the return of the empire to a position of military and political hegemony and the great treasure of the Vandals now in the hands of the Romans.
    As I said before the incoming years are going to be pretty eventful and for this reason I think I should start writing longer update.
     
  4. Wolttaire Kicked

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2018
    got some writer block?
     
    Flavius Iulius Nepos likes this.
  5. Flavius Iulius Nepos Emperor with the support of the East

    Joined:
    May 30, 2018
    Location:
    Near the colony of Ateste, Venetia et Histria
    Sorry for the lack of any update. To be honest I already know the exact details on the incoming updates, at least until the end of the VI century. Unfortunately it has been a difficult month with the job, university and two flights, so I didn’t have enough time or energy for the timeline. As soon as possible I’m going to resume it. We still have a war to conclude and an empire to restore.
     
  6. Threadmarks: Chapter XXXVIII: The decline of a king, the rise of a Caesar.

    Flavius Iulius Nepos Emperor with the support of the East

    Joined:
    May 30, 2018
    Location:
    Near the colony of Ateste, Venetia et Histria
    Chapter XXXVIII

    News of the fall of Carthago quickly spread outside Africa. The reactions to it ranged from the astonishment of the close allies of Rome to the envy and worries of its enemies. More concrete actions would however ensue, as new opportunities were now available for everyone with enough ambitions. The Visigothic kingdom would be the first “victim” of such men. But first we have to go back a couple of years.

    Here the regent of the kingdom, Agila, was facing for the first time, since the beginning of his reign, serious threats to his rule. His victories in Hispania won him prestige, power and the friendship of Rome and since then his rule over the Goths was based on these key factors. However almost 20 years had passed since Gesalec’s death and the memory of his victories were now more feeble. Prince Alaric and Theodoric were now ready to rule and their supporters were clamouring for the end of the regency. Loyalists of the previous dynasty, distant relatives of the Balti, personal enemies of Agila and members of the Arian church were all rallying behind the two princes, after having being forced into obscurity for almost two decades. King Agila was still strong enough to preserve his power through the use of strength and his personal riches, however the risk of a looming civil war forced him to seek cooperation and compromises. Thus in 530, the king was forced to associate the two Balti to the throne, even though their power was only nominal. Yet the first breach had now been opened. This was not his only concession as he was forced to get rid of Caesarius, his most trusted advisors but also a man despised by the same men who loathed Agila. His loyal service to Agila however didn't failed in earning him back the help of his liege, who was a man always prone to reward skills and diligence: warned by the king about the risk to his life, Caesarius and his family would secretly leave Toletum along with many other Roman members of the royal court. A ship would bring them to safety in Italy, but from now on these men were effectively banished from their own homes. One year later the death of the queen would further weaken Agila position among the Goths, as his ties with the royal family were now lost and so was the influence he could exert on Alaric and Theodoric through their mother.

    Back to Africa the war between the Romans and the Vandals was still going on. A serious blow had been inflicted on the Vandals with the loss of Carthago, yet their kingdom was not lost yet. The area west of Carthago was still controlled by Gelimer. His army still represented a threat and with the return of his brother from Sardinia, he had now seriously possibilities of attempting to take back the capital. The Sardinian rebels led by Godas had been defeated by Tzazo, who had left a small garrison inside the city of Calaris before heading back to Africa. While defeated, survivors of the rebel army still roamed on the northern part of island, as Tzazo lacked the time to deal once and for all with them before the beginning of the new season which would have made the sea unsafe. Meanwhile in Carthago the Romans were preparing to march against Gelimer and end the Vandalic kingdom before the end of the year. Thus in September, the Roman army departed from the city, marching against the city of Hippo Dyarrhytus, where the Vandal army was reported to be located. Before reaching the city small skirmishes between Roman and Vandalic units started harassing the emperor’s march, slowing down the army. The Vandals carefully avoided any major engagement with the Romans in an attempt to wear out their morale and numbers while attacking minor enemy detachments or their supply lines. During one day in October, local inhabitants reported to king Gelimer that they saw the Imperial Labarum leaving the main army with many soldiers behind it: a sign that the main army was no longer leaded by the emperor himself and an opportunity for him to attack the two armies separately. Gelimer decided that the opportunity to recover his kingdom had finally arrived, prompting him to march against the Romans. To his dismay he encountered the entire Roman army ready to face him. True was the fact that the emperor was not with the army but that was due to the fact that he was exploring the surrounding area with a small reconnaissance unit. The civilians who reported to Gelimer about the departure of the emperor, probably were not used to the estimation of the dimension on an army and to distinguish a small detachment from a major formation. Or probably those men had been previously bribed by the Romans. Nevertheless Gelimer cursed himself for being so rash before preparing for the unavoidable battle. Even though the initial enthusiasm of the Vandals for the incoming easy victory had completely disappeared, the two armies numbered an equal amount of soldiers and the chances of a Roman success were the same of a Vandal victory. When informed that a battle between his army and that of the Vandal was taking place, Marcianus quickly attempted to reach his soldiers. He had left them during the moment they needed him the most and now the fate of the African expedition was completely outside his control. When he arrived to the field, the battle was over. He was relieved to see that his soldiers had prevailed over the Vandals, thanks to Marcianus Valens leadership. His cousin once again proved to be a precious resource in the hands of the emperor as he not only was always able to accomplish his duties but even exceeded them: tales about how he distinguished himself in battle, personally leading his soldiers in the midst of the battle and never refraining from taking personal risk, were in the mouth of every single soldier who personally witnessed Valens deeds during that day. Other emperors would have seen such men as a possible threat for themselves but not this emperor: Iulius Marcianus valued skills above everything else and deeply trusted his cousin. What followed after the battle would be a proof of this: the emperor assigned to Marcianus Valens most of the lands that personally belonged to Gelimer ( even though the king was still alive). Finally he appointed Marcianus Valens Caesar of the Western Roman Empire and so his designated successors as Augustus of the empire, as he felt that in case of his sudden death, his young son Theodosius would not be completely ready yet for an empire which was still trying to recover from the disasters of the previous century. And, even though he couldn’t know it, an empire that would soon face other disasters.
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2018
Loading...