Is it ASB to imagine that one of the laws that Angoulême "introduces" /"revives" is that the king chooses the cabinet ministers, not the Corps Legislatif? The ministers are responsible to the king alone, however, they are not his equals in decision making, they are advisors only. The ministers' jobs is to carry out the king's will, they do not have legislative power (that remains with the Corps Legislatif) and the executive power is exercised by the king and the king alone
IMO, this might be a little difficult to push through.
 
Is it ASB to imagine that one of the laws that Angoulême "introduces" /"revives" is that the king chooses the cabinet ministers, not the Corps Legislatif? The ministers are responsible to the king alone, however, they are not his equals in decision making, they are advisors only. The ministers' jobs is to carry out the king's will, they do not have legislative power (that remains with the Corps Legislatif) and the executive power is exercised by the king and the king alone
I don’t think that would be asb
 
From a DM:
Can’t believe I forgot about this, but what would parliament say if instead of a civil list, Louis abd the crown took the control of the finances and properties and used the income to pay for some of the government expenses
would this be possible or would the deputies refuse entirely?
 
Oh? How so? Napoléon III got it right in the Second Empire just a few years later. Granted, it wasn't popular, but while "difficult" it might not be "impossible" (if exploiting the right circumstances).
Then is far from being impossible, but Louis/Henri will need to be much careful with timing and everything
 
Then is far from being impossible, but Louis/Henri will need to be much careful with timing and everything
What about a legal overhaul? While the Code Napoléon might be seen as sacrosanct, I could see them laying a lot of the blame for the problems of the last few years at its feet (however impossible it might seem). Roy, the minister of finance, was one of the biggest opponents of the Code (because of how it made him forfeit estates he had acquired lawfully). And Henri's visits to Lyons, Navarre, Brittany may have also opened his eyes to places where the Code is either inadequate or doesn't cover something at all.

The rights of women and the matter of divorce are two concerns that Henri HAS touched on prior to this. While it's not a proto-feminist movement, it does perhaps seek to restore to women the rights the Code Napoléon took away from them (like being able to enter contracts independently of her husband (established by Napoléon where any such contract was deemed null and void if the husband didn't grant his consent, and only returned to women in 1946); custody rights of children, ability to appear in court themselves rather than having to resort to a male proxy; that in the event of a divorce, a husband may NOT still have control of his wife's money/life; that adultery in the family home (like the Choiseul-Praslins) was to be blamed on the husband, outside of it, the woman bore the blame regardless; adultery saw a man fined but a woman jailed; a woman can't even give to charity without her husband's consent, a third of her income was to be used for the expenses of the marriage and she had no control of immovable property etc etc). Angoulême and Henri are still Catholic, still fundamentally opposed to divorce, but they have either been the product of or been married to strong-willed, capable women. After all, even Napoléon said of Madame Royal that "she's the only man in the family".

@isabella @HortenseMancini
 
What about a legal overhaul? While the Code Napoléon might be seen as sacrosanct, I could see them laying a lot of the blame for the problems of the last few years at its feet (however impossible it might seem). Roy, the minister of finance, was one of the biggest opponents of the Code (because of how it made him forfeit estates he had acquired lawfully). And Henri's visits to Lyons, Navarre, Brittany may have also opened his eyes to places where the Code is either inadequate or doesn't cover something at all.

The rights of women and the matter of divorce are two concerns that Henri HAS touched on prior to this. While it's not a proto-feminist movement, it does perhaps seek to restore to women the rights the Code Napoléon took away from them (like being able to enter contracts independently of her husband (established by Napoléon where any such contract was deemed null and void if the husband didn't grant his consent, and only returned to women in 1946); custody rights of children, ability to appear in court themselves rather than having to resort to a male proxy; that in the event of a divorce, a husband may NOT still have control of his wife's money/life; that adultery in the family home (like the Choiseul-Praslins) was to be blamed on the husband, outside of it, the woman bore the blame regardless; adultery saw a man fined but a woman jailed; a woman can't even give to charity without her husband's consent, a third of her income was to be used for the expenses of the marriage and she had no control of immovable property etc etc). Angoulême and Henri are still Catholic, still fundamentally opposed to divorce, but they have either been the product of or been married to strong-willed, capable women. After all, even Napoléon said of Madame Royal that "she's the only man in the family".

@isabella @HortenseMancini
A legal overhaul would be good… Restoring women‘s rights is great and also adjustments on the matter of divorce are needed… Puttings things like the shift fpr the ministers in the middle of a lot of other things, like restoring women‘s rights on proprieties and income, making them equal to men regarding the divorce and other needed adjustment of the Napoleonic code and various laws of LP would made it more acceptable
 
Another idea, inspired by Nagel's bio of Madame Royal that I was discussing with @Fehérvári :Henri spent a lot of his time (between his grandpa and uncle's deaths) visiting the mostly Lorrainer born/descended settlers in the Banat/Temeszvar (the first of whom had emigrated under Leopold I, the most recent during the reign of terror). Is it plausible that, particularly after his tours through his estats in Languedoc, Navarre and Brittany, that he encourages Hungarian/Lorrainer settlement to introduce new/different farming techniques/light industries to the region?

If this also slows the French demographic decline/speeds up the population recovery in the 19e century, definitely an added bonus
 
Another idea, inspired by Nagel's bio of Madame Royal that I was discussing with @Fehérvári :Henri spent a lot of his time (between his grandpa and uncle's deaths) visiting the mostly Lorrainer born/descended settlers in the Banat/Temeszvar (the first of whom had emigrated under Leopold I, the most recent during the reign of terror). Is it plausible that, particularly after his tours through his estats in Languedoc, Navarre and Brittany, that he encourages Hungarian/Lorrainer settlement to introduce new/different farming techniques/light industries to the region?

If this also slows the French demographic decline/speeds up the population recovery in the 19e century, definitely an added bonus
That would be good. He would need to make sure they integrate into France though. Otherwise he’s got a time bomb on his hands.
 
Sounds great!
That would be good. He would need to make sure they integrate into France though. Otherwise he’s got a time bomb on his hands.
agreed. I figure the main targets will be second/younger sons who aren't going to get anything in terms of inheritance (or starter families). And I think he'll make it clear from the get-go that this is "you'll be treated as every other Frenchman even though you're working for me". Although he may likewise use them to try and seed them among the population (encourage intermarriage with locals) if he plants them in areas royal power might not be so strong (like near Lyons or Marseilles). But I think he could also use his estates as a sort of "model farm" (not unthinkable, the duc d'Aumale did it OTL at Arroucières) to try out things like "medical schemes" for the workers or education for their kids. In the hopes of "inspiring" other businesses/landowners to do the same.
 
agreed. I figure the main targets will be second/younger sons who aren't going to get anything in terms of inheritance (or starter families). And I think he'll make it clear from the get-go that this is "you'll be treated as every other Frenchman even though you're working for me". Although he may likewise use them to try and seed them among the population (encourage intermarriage with locals) if he plants them in areas royal power might not be so strong (like near Lyons or Marseilles). But I think he could also use his estates as a sort of "model farm" (not unthinkable, the duc d'Aumale did it OTL at Arroucières) to try out things like "medical schemes" for the workers or education for their kids. In the hopes of "inspiring" other businesses/landowners to do the same.
Brilliant!
 
So....whose gonna be the new Prince of Munster, once they kick Metternich out?
provided they don't, it'll be his eldest legitimate son, theoretically. But I was imagining the creation as a Napoleonic duché-grands-fiefs. It goes to Metternich, but he doesn't actually have any sovereign power in the principality (where Gustaf and Marianne are Princes Souverains). So Metternich gets the revenues from the area, but he still has to do as the emperor commands, the army, mint etc are still the emperor's rather than independent
 
I would've liked that idea, but I suspect the Brasilian climate may be better for her health than Paris. Also, I wanted to give Pedro II a "good" wife TTL, and Auguste was basically as good as he was going to be able to get (even with Frankie's help the common consensus was that you were essentially sacrificing your daughter to the minotaur AIUI).
 
I would've liked that idea, but I suspect the Brasilian climate may be better for her health than Paris. Also, I wanted to give Pedro II a "good" wife TTL, and Auguste was basically as good as he was going to be able to get (even with Frankie's help the common consensus was that you were essentially sacrificing your daughter to the minotaur AIUI).
Ooooh for some reason I thought Auguste was marrying Henri, idk why, but that sounds reasonable, hopefully she and pedro are happy together
 
For anyone interested, these was the carriage(s) built for Henri de Chambord's proposed return to Paris in 1871 and never used. Wonder if its ASB to imagine Angoulême/Madame Royal/duchesse de Berri returning to Paris in such coaches (to arrive in "an open chariot" symbolizes a conquered city)?
IMG_8574.webp

IMG_8576.webp
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He To The Field By Duty Call'd Shall Go
This is over several days/weeks rather than all in the same day. For those who wanted to see a "bit more" of what Metternich did (if not how he fell), I hope you approve:

Soundtrack: Carl Gottlieb Reissiger - Die Felsenmühle von Estalières [1]

*exterior* *Meidlinger Vertiefung [2] of Schönbrunn Palace* *we see Frankie - stripped to the waist - working furiously in the garden* *there are old scars - clearly war wounds - that have started fading* *and ones on his back and chest that are clearly newer* *also, some fading bruises on his face* *a cut to his left nostril* *Empress Karoline walks in, dressed in mourning*
Karoline: *gently* Frankie?
Frankie: *ignores her and continues hoeing a furrow*
Karoline: *waits for a beat* *then tries again*
Frankie: *continues working*
Karoline: *approaches* *gently touches his shoulder* Napoléon [3].
Frankie: *looks up at her, as if he's just realized she's there* Oma, what is it?
Karoline: the children came to call me, Frankie. They said they asked you to help them build a sandcastle?
*we see the "castle" the children were building* *we see how much Frankie's done* *we've got ramparts, earthworks, a moat, and various other "accessories" that were clearly not the kids' idea*
Frankie: *sheepishly looking around* I might've got a bit...carried away.
Karoline: you think? *gently leads him to the bench and sits down* are you sleeping at all?
Frankie: something tells me you've already got the answer to that.
Karoline: oh, your Standejsky is very good [at lying for you]. Marmont too. But just because I'm an old woman, doesn't make me a fool.
Frankie: *half-smiling* if you're old, Oma, than Mama must be ancient.
Karoline: he [your grandfather] loved you a lot, he'd tell everyone how proud he was of you. I think that's what panicked Metternich. Or rather, why he panicked.
Frankie: *touches scar on his chest* *it looks like a brand or hot piece of metal was used* this is not a man who was panicked, Oma. It's from a man who has been carefully and meticulously planning this for a long time.
Karoline: *sadly* I still cannot believe what he did to you.
Frankie: I'm a nobody, Oma. A sparrow flying through a hallway, in at one end and out at the other, and neither the sparrow nor the hall is any different for my arrival or departure.
Karoline: *grips the side of his face* you are not a nobody. You are the grandson of the emperor of Austria and the regent of the empire. And it's time you start behaving like it. Avoiding council meetings and leaving government business in my hands for Ferdinand is not going to solve the problem. Indeed, they're already whispering that you are a coward as well as a bully for having driven Prince Metternich out but done nothing since.
Frankie: forgive me for mourning my grandfather and my son, Oma.

*flashback to Amalie going into premature labour on a table in an inn en route back from Venice* *the baby born dead* *Frankie being dragged roughly from her side* *her screaming and crying*

Frankie: Amalie is terrified to leave the apartments. Therese wakes up screaming. Leopold is too scared to leave Eugène, Nardus and Lorenz alone.

*flashback to Leopold and the other three boys in a cell in the Karlau Prison in Graz*
Leopold: I want to see my father.
Guard: *snorts and turns around*
Leopold: *kicks his shins* I said I want to see my father. That means you take me to see my father!
Guard: *laughs scornfully as he bends over* and who are you...little Herr Bonaparte, they say your father wants to be emperor one day.
Leopold: my father will have your head
Guard: will he now? *shoves Leopold back into the floor* *walks off laughing*

Frankie: and that was done to me by my own [great] uncles. It's now the second time that I've been stabbed in the back by my uncles. Forgive me, Oma, for feeling like telling Austria, the Empire and all of Europe to kindly go fuck itself and I'll leave for Texas or Mexico.
Karoline: *forces him to look at her again* you are not going to Mexico. You can go in 1848, when Franzi is eighteen. Until then, you finish what the Hell you started ten years ago. Am I clear, Frankie?
Frankie: and if I don't?
Karoline: if you don't, you'll have proved them all right. That you're scared of them. That you're incapable. That you're incompetent. And who do you think benefits by that? Not Ferdinand. Not Franzi. Not anyone except Metternich. So...clean yourself up, pick yourself up, and you go and show them that you're your father's son. You think he would've left Metternich alone in exile? The man's hardly Talleyrand or Fouché.
Frankie: you think I didn't want his head on a stick to protect my family?
Karoline: your family isn't just your woman and children now. Your family is the entire dynasty. Your grandfather left them in your hands because he knew you would fight to the last drop of your blood for them. If you stay here, doing nothing, you're not protecting them. What's worse, you're not even trying. And Metternich wins. And he can do whatever the Hell he likes. If there's no throne for Franzi to inherit one day...what will happen then? Will you be able to look at yourself in the mirror knowing you just stood there - like the duc d'Orléans - and waited for them to raise their axes to kill you? The boy I raised is not so cowardly. *leaves him alone on the bench*

*interior* *Hall of Ceremonies at Schönbrunn* *Emperor Ferdinand and Empress Maria Anna are seated on the thrones at the head of the room* *around them on tabourets are seated Frankie, Archdukes Franz Karl and Franzi, the Archduchess Sophie* *the rest of the courtiers are standing around* *we see Metternich's stalwart ally, the Comte de Bombelles enter*
Bombelles: *bows* your Majesty.
Ferdinand: *loudly to the court* it is our great pleasure to announce to you all, that in recognition for his long and unremitting labours to our family, we have charged the Comte de Bombelles to be our representative and minister plenipotentiary to the court in Paris for the coronation of his Majesty, the king of France [4].
*courtiers applaud politely*
Bombelles: your Majesty does me much honour.
Ferdinand: it is simply what is owed, my dear Comte. And once the coronation is over, it is our further honour, for us to appoint you as our ambassador to Stockholm.
Bombelles: to Sweden, sire?
Ferdinand: yes. And his Most Christian Majesty has proved more than generous to be happy to return to you the chateau d'Orangis that belonged to your family
Oberhofmeister: *hands a rolled up title deed and a set of keys to Bombelles*
Ferdinand: the owner's were killed in the tragedy of the late war, and the house is now standing empty. The king was most kind in returning it to you and yours.
Bombelles: I have no words, sire. We are most grateful.
*Frankie leads a second round of applause*

*to the soundtrack of the applause we see the guard who had mocked and shoved Leopold in Graz lying in a sentrybox at a crazy angle, blood pooling around him* *we see guards that dragged Frankie away from Amalie being smothered by pillows in their beds* *we see the commandant who led the arrest of Frankie, Amalie and co in Venice start choking at dinner in a restaurant in Vienna* *nobody else in the restaurant, neither other patrons nor staff, even look up, despite the man's repeated cries for "help me!"* *finally he keels over dead* [5]

*interior* *Chinesisches Kabinett at Schönbrunn* *Frankie is sitting working at a desk* *talking to Schwarzenberg, the new Minister of Foreign Affairs*
Frankie: -then make sure that we have the full reports on all the current ambassadors. I want to know which of them are still taking their orders from Metternich. If they refuse, I'll have them all recalled to Vienna if I have to.
Schwarzenberg: of course, sir.
Footman: Her Majesty, the French Empress.
Frankie: *wryly* speak of the Devil. *smiles as he rises* Madame.
*someone hurries in with a chair for her to be seated*
Frankie: *to the servant* you may remove it, the Comtesse Bombelles has no need of it. *to Schwarzenberg* thank you Felix, you may go.
Schwarzenberg: *bows out of the room as if Frankie's mother isn't even there*
Marie Louise: *as soon as the door is closed* do you think this is funny? *despite the fact that Marie Louise is only a year older than her stepmother and considerably younger than Madame Royal, she has not "aged well"* *she is grey and dowdy* *while neither of the other women can be said to be "glamourous" or "beautiful", there is a certain aura of dignity to their bearing noticeably "absent" from the former empress of the French and duchess of Parma*
Frankie: that depends what this is.
Marie Louise: *thrusts ambassadorial brief into Frankie's hand*
Frankie: *doesn't even look at it* ah...you see, I thought by doing it I was being kind.
Marie Louise: what does a viper like you know of kindness?
Frankie: very little, I'm afraid. After all, I'm a Bonaparte. What could I possibly know of kindness?
Marie Louise: you have banished me?
Frankie: hardly, Madame, you have always said how you wish to return to Paris. Now I have presented you with an opportunity to do so. Your husband - my stepfather - is to be the emperor's new ambassador. And you as his loyal, charming, smiling and dutiful wife are to accompany him to Paris. You may remain at Orangis or accompany him to Stockholm. It is all the same to me.
Marie Louise: you would separate me from my children? From my grandchildren.
Frankie: *coldly* and what am I to you, Madame? An unpleasant reminder of a foolish mistake you made once upon a time? Is that why I was imprisoned in Graz? Beaten? Burned? Starved? For daring to oppose your beloved friend, Metternich. Why Amalie was beaten and went into premature labour on an inn's table? Why my son is dead? Why Amalie only barely survived? What of your grandchildren who were in prison in Graz for no other reason than having me for a father? Did you raise a finger to assist them?
Marie Louise: *stonily silent*
Frankie: do you hear that? It's my father, howling at you from the tomb...that you have finally become so heartless that you are worthy of being a Bonaparte. Your son and grandchildren owe their survival to the heir to the throne of France, not to you. So...you may return to Paris. And take the Princesse de Lambesc [6] and her shabby mother with you.
Marie Louise: and you may do as you see fit here?
Frankie: I may do as the empire sees fit, Madame. If I were to do as I saw fit, my children and I should be aboard a steamer bound for Baltimore to visit Uncle Joseph.
Marie Louise: and what does the empire need? More war, I suppose.
Frankie: the empire needs peace. But not peace at any price as Metternich would've sold us at. I've already instructed Trauttmansdorff in Berlin to reject the proposal of Princess Luise for Franzi on the terms they offer her.
Marie Louise: your father always refused to make peace when it was offered. Look how he ended up.
Frankie: so if Austria, Russia, Prussia and England had offered him peace, and in exchange for allowing him to keep the Rhine border, they demand that he surrender Brittany and Aquitaine, would he have agreed to it?
Marie Louise: that is not what Metternich has done. He has tried to obtain an honourable position for us to bargain from-
Frankie: except his honourable position, Madame, came at the price of every alliance that Austria has built. Why? Because I built those for Austria and turned his policy on it's head. He was unable to see past his prejudices that perhaps his continued alliance with Prussia is not worth it-
Standejsky: *enters* your Serene Highness. *ignores Marie Louise* we've just received news from Stockholm that King Charles has died.
Frankie: *to Marie Louise* well, it looks like you will be travelling to Stockholm before you head to Paris to carry the emperor's condolences. I bid you bon voyage et bon chance, Madame. *kisses her hand in a way to indicate the interview is over*

*fade to black*

[1] the mill/house on the cliff of Estalières
[2] the children's garden in the eastern half of the park, one can still see the traces of the imperial playground, where there was a pavilion at the centre of a small animals enclosure, an ‘Indian’s hut’ made of straw but also (in keeping with the military cast of his upbringing) a little fortress with earth ramparts and an exercise ground. Also, the Robinson's Cave is where Frankie used to keep his garden tools
[3] Frankie has mentioned to Louise d'Artois that "only my mother calls me Napoléon", but it could also be the equivalent of a parent using your full name when angry with you
[4] Esterhazy is still the ambassador, but for coronations, monarchs often appointed a special ambassador (like how Morny was sent to Russia for the coronation of Alexander II or Soult to England for Queen Victoria's).
[5] this is vengeance, Corsican style. These men are not given the publicity of a trial or an execution, just quietly disposed of in a place where they...likely felt safe. Frankie lasers in on the ones directly involved rather than poison/disband the whole regiment. He also ensures it that the deaths can easily be explained as "natural" (the guard was murdered in the sentrybox by a local criminal; the guards who were smothered died in their sleep after drinking too much; the commandant in Vienna found something in his food he was allergic to. It's swift and brutal, and while he doesn't make a habit of murdering/poisoning his political opponents - he probably has a guy for that that nothing can be traced back to him - this is personal.
[6] Marie Louise's governess, Victoire de Folliot de Crenneville married the Prince de Lambesc OTL. They had no children (since she was already in her fifties at the time of the marriage). I had this idea that Victoire's daughter (b.1789) is the one to marry Lambesc instead, and that they managed to have at least a son (so the non-Habsburg house of Lorraine continues). Any thoughts?


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