So I went down a youtube rabbit hole:

The anthem of the Kingdom of Lombardy-Venetia:

The anthem of the Kingdom of Hungary

The anthem of the Kingdom of Bohemia

The anthem of the Kingdom of Croatia

The anthem in Romanian:

all the same tune, same idea, but different words and language used to express it.
 
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So I went down a youtube rabbit hole:

The anthem of the Kingdom of Lombardy-Venetia:

The anthem of the Kingdom of Hungary

The anthem of the Kingdom of Bohemia

The anthem of the Kingdom of Croatia

The anthem in Romanian:

all the same tune, same idea, but different words and language used to express it.
AEIOU!

Thanks!
 
Waiting for Guizot
It is Paris! I understand that whatever you did in the 19th would never, even, aproach the horrors of 20th century arquitecture, but... It is Paris!! Good luck.
And thanks a lot for your work
A look at what's happening in France. This is more just a look at how things have been going down rather than actually moving the plot along- although Pam did have such long discussions with the French ambassador OTL as well. He even admits to it in a speech to parliament that it was for three days in a row that he had held long discussions "the ambassador arrived in the morning and remained until a late hour" to make sure that the ambassador "clearly understood" Britain's position.- specifically with both the chambers and the redesign of Paris (and the...problems)

Soundtrack: Jean Baptiste Davaux - Sinfonie Concertante 'Mêlée d'Airs Patriotique' in G Major - Allegro Moderato 'La Marseillaise'

*exterior* *London* *we see a carriage stop at 4 Carlton Gardens and the French ambassador, the duc de Broglie, climbs out* *we next see him being shown into a room where Viscount Palmerston is waiting*
*cut to clearly late in the evening* *the street lamps are lit and Broglie's coachman is clearly irritated at having been left outside for so long* *Broglie emerges from Palmerston's home and we hear him promising to return to discuss the matter further the next day*

*cut to Calais* *we see the Dover packet arriving* *cut to Broglie stepping ashore in France once more* *the man looks as though he's practically about to fall on his knees and kiss the ground in relief* *with him, is an interesting companion: one Monsieur François Guizot* *Guizot, unlike Broglie, does not look thrilled to be back in France* *in fact, he looks rather uncomfortable*

*cut to Paris* *the French chambres are convening* *clearly this is a "joint" session, since we see Louis XIX sitting in state on the throne* *on the middle of three tabourets on a step lower than him are Berryer, Chancellor of France* *on either side of him are the marquis de la Rochejacquelein [1], président of the Chambre des Pairs, and the président of the Chambre des Deputés, Nicolas Changarnier [2]*
*the hall- buzzing before procedings commence- falls silent*
Serjeant-at-Arms: *announces* Monsieur François Pierre Guillaume Guizot enter the chamber.
*we see several members jeering and even protesting at the outrage of allowing this man to enter the sacred purlieus*
Louis XIX: silence!
Guizot: *looks at the king as though to say "like that'll work*
*to our surprise and probably Guizot's too, the hubbub dies down*
Guizot: *is brought to the steps at the foot of the throne* *he stands before Louis XIX* *looks at the king for a moment* *then slowly bows*
Louis XIX: *without allowing him to rise* Monsieur Guizot...we are so pleased to welcome you home to France after your...long absence in England.
Guizot: *starts speaking*
Louis XIX: *cuts him short* we trust that your time in England has not robbed you of your manners. *clearly dismissive* the serjeant may escort you to the gallery.

*cut to Broglie making his report on the state of affairs in England, what Lord Palmerston has said et cetera et cetera* *we see several of the peers and deputies both shouting about the outrage of "perfidious Albion"* *each time Louis XIX clears his throat for order and the hall falls silent*
*pan up to the gallery where, lazily leaning on the balcony is Louis Napoléon, duc de Saint-Leu, he's clearly Guizot's "jailer"*
Guizot: is it always like this?
Saint-Leu: tumultuous?
Guizot: that the king is able to do that?
Saint-Leu: that the king is able to do that? Or because your king was never able to do that?
Guizot: *about to answer*
Saint-Leu: *half-smiling* I admit, he doesn't look the type. All old and nervous and frail...but he knows how to handle the circus down there. As my son says, you're never quite sure if he's the lion-tamer or the lion.
Guizot: do I detect a note of awe in your voice, Monsieur le Duc?
Saint-Leu: you find my admiring his Majesty unseemly?
Guizot: I simply wondered if you were taking pointers.
Saint-Leu: when I was younger and stupider, I escaped the firing squad thanks to my mother and no thanks to your king-
Guizot: you were a traitor who attempted to lead an insurrection against his Majesty.
Saint-Leu: and you, Monsieur Guizot, are a traitor until such time as the king of France and Navarre deems otherwise. I, on the other hand, have- on my cousin's advice- made my peace with the king and queen. My daughter is the duchesse de Polignac and in waiting to the duchesse de Berri, Lulu is currently serving in Algeria and Enzio [3] is on an outing with my brother and the duc d'Orléans.
Guizot: an outing?
Saint-Leu: more like a daily excursion to the Gymnase Triât-
Guizot: the Gymnase Triât? Is that like a school?
Saint-Leu: it's a sort of hall where you can exercise to keep fit. My brother, the ducs de Montpensier and Seville and one or two others are all clients of Monsieur Triât [4]. He's actually attempting to get the king to establish the portfolio of a "minister of physical education" [5].
Guizot: you don't sound optimistic-
Saint-Leu: the duc de Bordeaux might do it when he becomes king, *looks at Louis XIX* I think his Majesty will not.
Guizot: if he becomes king.
Saint-Leu: is that a threat, Monsieur Guizot?
Guizot: if the king blunders into a war with Great Britain like they are clamouring for, he might end up going the same way as King Louis Philippe.
Saint-Leu: if you think his Majesty is so stupid as to blunder into a war, then I should suggest that you stop comparing him with my uncle. The king is aware of how precarious things are. He will not risk it.
Guizot: *looks down at hall* he may not have a choice.
Saint-Leu: per the charte [6], the Assemblée does not have the powers to declare war, Monsieur Guizot. Those powers remain with the king. After all, seeing the unholy mess that the duc d'Orléans and then the republic got us into when the Assemblée had those powers makes it better if they do not have them.
Guizot: so the king can deny the will of the people then?
Saint-Leu: my uncle reigned for the gloire and France was caught up in one never-ending war. His Majesty's father got bogged down in an Algerian quagmire that half the Assemblée can't decide if they want or not. The duc d'Orléans involved us in another war. In the last fifty years, France's longest period of peace was- excepting his Majesty marching to Spain in support of King Ferdinand- the decade after my uncle being deposed. It would suit Britain to go to war with us. It is, however, a race to the bottom in which we have no horse.
Guizot: slavery is still not abolished in France.
Saint-Leu: technically it is.
Guizot: if the king is restored then that-
Saint-Leu: the republic- the literatti at my cousin, the duchesse d'Uzès' salon [7] calling it the "Second" as though that is somehow better. Or as though the First Republic was in any way any more successful-
Guizot: *distastefully* at least your uncle didn't execute the leaders as the Bourbons did.
Saint-Leu: my uncle murdered more than his fair share of people: the late duc d'Enghien is simply the name everyone cares to recall. One forgets his actions in the Vendée. Or that he criticized the queen's father for not being willing to fight for his throne. In fact, the king was one of the ones who wished to await the arrival of the army to deal with the rising that brought your late master to power in 1830; he was overruled [8]. So when he was given the chance to return, as much as he would have preferred not to, he did not make the same mistake a second time. If only to prove Talleyrand wrong that Bourbons learn nothing. -now, to return to the matter of slavery. The republic abolished it, even before they had decided on their constitution or who should be their leader, they re-asserted the law of 16 pluviose an II [9]. When the charte was drafted, the king insisted that it be inclu-
Guizot: *interrupts as someone stands up below* what madwoman has wandered in from the street down there?
Saint-Leu: *chuckling* one of the three Les Tricoteuses [10] in the Chambre. That is Madame Roland- no relation of the guillotined lady of the same name.
Guizot: is that also in the charte? That women can vote?
Saint-Leu: it's not. But there also is no law that explicitly prevents them from standing for public office. And both the king and the duc de Bordeaux decided that it would be...ill-advised to refuse to honour the will of the people. It should say something when a woman- much less three- obtains more votes than her male contenders, but all the voters are men.
Guizot: I'm trying to determine if his Majesty is a mad man or a-
Saint-Leu: you have two daughters, don't you, Monsieur Guizot [11]?
Guizot: yes.
Saint-Leu: then wouldn't- if one of them were to display any aptitude for politics [12]- you wish for them to be able to follow in your footsteps if they so chose? Or would you prefer for her to become a spinster governess?
Guizot: *looks rather offended by the idea*
Saint-Leu: it would not be my first preference of career for my daughter or a granddaughter, but I also wouldn't want them to be a nun. And while even Madame Sand and the Comtesse d'Agoult would share both your sentiments and mine, as my brother says, "march at the head of the ideas of your century, and these ideas follow you and support you. March behind them and they drag you after them. March against them and they overthrow you. [13]"

*few days later* *Place de la Bastille* *Hector Berlioz is conducting the military band* *there is a cheering crowd gathered all around as the soldiers march into the square escorting the king on horseback*
*cut to the Minister de Travaux Publiques, Jacques Ignace Hittorff [14] making a short speech* *and then, once the applause dies down, we see the king sitting in the "royal box" with the duchesse de Berri at his side, give the signal*
Guizot: the queen is ill?
Alphonse de Lamartine [14]: *quietly* his Majesty believed that obliging her to attend this ceremony- on the site of the Bastille, at a memorial to the dead of both the July and April Revolutions- would be too cruel.
*the side panels of a wooden box at the centre of the place are lowered* *to reveal...a gleaming gilt-bronze elephant*
Guizot: that is what all the fuss is about?
Lamartine: no fuss, I assure you, Guizot.
Guizot: my dear Lamartine, since I have returned, I have seen a Bourbon pretending to be a Bonaparte. First in the chambres, then in that ridiculous palais that he is building at Chaillot, now with this elephant?
*a cheer goes up as the fountain begins to spout from the elephant's trunk*
Lamartine: is it a Bourbon pretending to be a Bonaparte? Or Bonaparte who wished to be a Bourbon? The design of an elephant fountain was originally considered for the Place de la Concorde when it was laid out under Louis XV already.
*we hear snippets of Louis XIX announcing to the crowd that he planned to open this fountain in commemoration of the fall of the Bastille on its fiftieth anniversary [14 July 1849]*
Guizot: *drowning out why Louis XIX didn't* so he tears down the column to the revolution-
Lamartine: not at all. The king decided to...rearrange things. When the April Revolution took place, in addition to burning the throne, Notre Dame, the court carriages and so on, the revolutionaries also toppled the Austerlitz Column. If we had left them long enough, no doubt they would've exploded the Pont d'Iena for what it represents. But that angered the Bonapartists...sacred cows and all that. There was a great bickering on the part of the architects about it, whether to restore the column or not. The duc de Bordeaux proposed the Elephant as a compromise.
Guizot: a compromise?
Lamartine: it was one of the emperor's plans, so supporting it would soothe the ruffled Bonapartist feathers about wanton destruction. To the royalists the choice of place removed a memorial to the revolution- they wished to have Monsieur Hittolff build the new opera house here-. To the Parisians, *points to fountain* it is representative of not only the king providing them with water, but also the duc de Seville and comte de Triel's championing of overhauling of the city's sewer system. The only objectors were the Orléanists such as yourself.
Guizot: so he melted down the July Column?
Lamartine: that was the king's mediation. Since the Austerlitz column left an empty base, and the July Column would have to be taken down to build the elephant...his Majesty decided that a solution to the problem- and a way of appeasing both the republicans and the Orléanists- would be to move the July Column to the Place Louis le Grand [15] rather than destroying it.
Guizot: *irritably as he watches the king descend from the box to make his way to his horse* *he is "working the crowd" returning salutes and accepting kisses to his hand* I take it back, the king isn't trying to be Bonaparte, he is doing exactly what Bonaparte did. He is rewriting history to suit his own...propaganda
Lamartine: not exactly what Bonaparte did. If it were, you, my dear Guizot, would still be in exile teaching students at Oxford how your king's rewritten history. *watches as Louis XIX mounts his horse unaided* perhaps it is for the best that the comte de Triel, Professor Filon [16] and Monsieur Dumas were given charge of the duc d'Orléans and his brother's education rather than yourself. Who knows how one such as yourself might be able to...rewrite history. *cold smile*

*fade to black*

[1] Rochejacquelein planned to stand for election in 1848, with the hope of facilitating a monarchist restoration
[2] thanks to @DrakeRlugia for pointing me in the direction of this politician
[3] Louis, Duc de Saint-Leu is the elder son of Hortense de Beauharnais and Louis Bonaparte. He has three children, a daughter, Julie (b.1827), and two sons, Louis "Lulu" (b.1830) and Henri "Enzio" (b.1835)
[4] OTL Napoléon III ("my brother", TTL comte de Triel) was a client of Hippolyte Triât, who established one of the first gyms (in the modern sense) in Paris in 1846. How did Montpensier get into it? Figure as the "bachelor uncle" with no kids of his own, he's a species of "guardian" for his nephews as much as Napoléon III is their "tutor"/governor. So he likely went to check it out to see what it's all about. He and Seville both being members could be a hilarious take on their OTL rivalry and TTL they're those two guys at the gym who are constantly competing with one another.
[5] they actually tried this in the Second Republic OTL
[6] not sure what the 1815 charte said about this, but there was debate at the drafting of the Second Republic constitution of this power devolving to the assemblée due to fears of the executive branch of government being too powerful
[7] Mathilde Bonaparte
[8] OTL
[9] Law of 4 February 1794 which reads: The National Convention declares slavery abolished throughout all the colonies: consequently, it decrees that all men, without distinction of color, domiciliated in the colonies, are French citizens, and entitled to the enjoyment of all the rights secured by the Constitution. Referred to the Committee of Public Safety for it to report immediately on the measures to be taken for the execution of the decree
[10] Les tricoteuses (the knitters) were the women who sat alongside the guillotine with their knitting during the Revolution. Of the trio listed, both Jeanne Deroin and Désirée Gay were originally seamstresses by trade, hence the nickname. The third is Pauline Roland
[11] OTL, Guizot had three sons and two daughters. The eldest son died a few days after his birth in 1813. His second son, François Junior died of pleurisy in 1837. The third boy, Guillaume, was born in 1833, and while he lived until 1892, his health was always fragile. TTL, Guillaume and his brother both die in 1837. I can't find out exactly what Guizot's stance on women's suffrage was, although given the fact that he was against universal suffrage, that might be an indicator.
[12] Guizot's elder daughter, Henriette (b.1829) did display her father's aptitude for both history, economics and languages and often acted as his hostess at the ministry OTL.
[13] Napoléon III really did say this. Pity he didn't take his own advice
[14] While most famously remembered as the architect responsible for the redesign of the Place de la Concorde in 1833, Hittorff actually has a pretty distinguished pedigree as an architect. He was one of Percier and Fontaine's chief draughtsmen. Then he was basically whatever the reincarnation of the Directeur des Menu-Plaisirs was from 1819-1830. He worked on the façades on the Champs-Elysées, the Rue de Rivoli and the Place de l'Étoile and the design of the Bois de Boulogne and the Garé du Nord. He finally fell out of favour with Napoléon III with his design for the Exposition Universelle (Napoléon le Petit considered Hittorff's plan for the grand palais "poor" and handed it off to another architect. Given that that other architect's design was criticized as resembling "an ox trampling through a rose garden", I'm not sure that was a credit to Nappy's artistic taste)
[14] while Lamartine was a Bonapartist, he actually started his "career" as a species of valet/page to Charles X
[15] OTL Place Vendôme
[16] Charles Auguste Filon, father of Augustin Filon- tutor to Napoléon III's son- and a respected monarchist, historian and professor in his own right. With one of his magnum opuses being a critical Histoire comparée de la France et de l'Angleterre (1832). Augustin and his older brother would actually be roughly "of an age" with both the duc d'Orléans (OTL comte de Paris) and Napoléon III's TTL children.
 
A look at what's happening in France. This is more just a look at how things have been going down rather than actually moving the plot along- although Pam did have such long discussions with the French ambassador OTL as well. He even admits to it in a speech to parliament that it was for three days in a row that he had held long discussions "the ambassador arrived in the morning and remained until a late hour" to make sure that the ambassador "clearly understood" Britain's position.- specifically with both the chambers and the redesign of Paris (and the...problems)

Soundtrack: Jean Baptiste Davaux - Sinfonie Concertante 'Mêlée d'Airs Patriotique' in G Major - Allegro Moderato 'La Marseillaise'

*exterior* *London* *we see a carriage stop at 4 Carlton Gardens and the French ambassador, the duc de Broglie, climbs out* *we next see him being shown into a room where Viscount Palmerston is waiting*
*cut to clearly late in the evening* *the street lamps are lit and Broglie's coachman is clearly irritated at having been left outside for so long* *Broglie emerges from Palmerston's home and we hear him promising to return to discuss the matter further the next day*

*cut to Calais* *we see the Dover packet arriving* *cut to Broglie stepping ashore in France once more* *the man looks as though he's practically about to fall on his knees and kiss the ground in relief* *with him, is an interesting companion: one Monsieur François Guizot* *Guizot, unlike Broglie, does not look thrilled to be back in France* *in fact, he looks rather uncomfortable*

*cut to Paris* *the French chambres are convening* *clearly this is a "joint" session, since we see Louis XIX sitting in state on the throne* *on the middle of three tabourets on a step lower than him are Berryer, Chancellor of France* *on either side of him are the marquis de la Rochejacquelein [1], président of the Chambre des Pairs, and the président of the Chambre des Deputés, Nicolas Changarnier [2]*
*the hall- buzzing before procedings commence- falls silent*
Serjeant-at-Arms: *announces* Monsieur François Pierre Guillaume Guizot enter the chamber.
*we see several members jeering and even protesting at the outrage of allowing this man to enter the sacred purlieus*
Louis XIX: silence!
Guizot: *looks at the king as though to say "like that'll work*
*to our surprise and probably Guizot's too, the hubbub dies down*
Guizot: *is brought to the steps at the foot of the throne* *he stands before Louis XIX* *looks at the king for a moment* *then slowly bows*
Louis XIX: *without allowing him to rise* Monsieur Guizot...we are so pleased to welcome you home to France after your...long absence in England.
Guizot: *starts speaking*
Louis XIX: *cuts him short* we trust that your time in England has not robbed you of your manners. *clearly dismissive* the serjeant may escort you to the gallery.

*cut to Broglie making his report on the state of affairs in England, what Lord Palmerston has said et cetera et cetera* *we see several of the peers and deputies both shouting about the outrage of "perfidious Albion"* *each time Louis XIX clears his throat for order and the hall falls silent*
*pan up to the gallery where, lazily leaning on the balcony is Louis Napoléon, duc de Saint-Leu, he's clearly Guizot's "jailer"*
Guizot: is it always like this?
Saint-Leu: tumultuous?
Guizot: that the king is able to do that?
Saint-Leu: that the king is able to do that? Or because your king was never able to do that?
Guizot: *about to answer*
Saint-Leu: *half-smiling* I admit, he doesn't look the type. All old and nervous and frail...but he knows how to handle the circus down there. As my son says, you're never quite sure if he's the lion-tamer or the lion.
Guizot: do I detect a note of awe in your voice, Monsieur le Duc?
Saint-Leu: you find my admiring his Majesty unseemly?
Guizot: I simply wondered if you were taking pointers.
Saint-Leu: when I was younger and stupider, I escaped the firing squad thanks to my mother and no thanks to your king-
Guizot: you were a traitor who attempted to lead an insurrection against his Majesty.
Saint-Leu: and you, Monsieur Guizot, are a traitor until such time as the king of France and Navarre deems otherwise. I, on the other hand, have- on my cousin's advice- made my peace with the king and queen. My daughter is the duchesse de Polignac and in waiting to the duchesse de Berri, Lulu is currently serving in Algeria and Enzio [3] is on an outing with my brother and the duc d'Orléans.
Guizot: an outing?
Saint-Leu: more like a daily excursion to the Gymnase Triât-
Guizot: the Gymnase Triât? Is that like a school?
Saint-Leu: it's a sort of hall where you can exercise to keep fit. My brother, the ducs de Montpensier and Seville and one or two others are all clients of Monsieur Triât [4]. He's actually attempting to get the king to establish the portfolio of a "minister of physical education" [5].
Guizot: you don't sound optimistic-
Saint-Leu: the duc de Bordeaux might do it when he becomes king, *looks at Louis XIX* I think his Majesty will not.
Guizot: if he becomes king.
Saint-Leu: is that a threat, Monsieur Guizot?
Guizot: if the king blunders into a war with Great Britain like they are clamouring for, he might end up going the same way as King Louis Philippe.
Saint-Leu: if you think his Majesty is so stupid as to blunder into a war, then I should suggest that you stop comparing him with my uncle. The king is aware of how precarious things are. He will not risk it.
Guizot: *looks down at hall* he may not have a choice.
Saint-Leu: per the charte [6], the Assemblée does not have the powers to declare war, Monsieur Guizot. Those powers remain with the king. After all, seeing the unholy mess that the duc d'Orléans and then the republic got us into when the Assemblée had those powers makes it better if they do not have them.
Guizot: so the king can deny the will of the people then?
Saint-Leu: my uncle reigned for the gloire and France was caught up in one never-ending war. His Majesty's father got bogged down in an Algerian quagmire that half the Assemblée can't decide if they want or not. The duc d'Orléans involved us in another war. In the last fifty years, France's longest period of peace was- excepting his Majesty marching to Spain in support of King Ferdinand- the decade after my uncle being deposed. It would suit Britain to go to war with us. It is, however, a race to the bottom in which we have no horse.
Guizot: slavery is still not abolished in France.
Saint-Leu: technically it is.
Guizot: if the king is restored then that-
Saint-Leu: the republic- the literatti at my cousin, the duchesse d'Uzès' salon [7] calling it the "Second" as though that is somehow better. Or as though the First Republic was in any way any more successful-
Guizot: *distastefully* at least your uncle didn't execute the leaders as the Bourbons did.
Saint-Leu: my uncle murdered more than his fair share of people: the late duc d'Enghien is simply the name everyone cares to recall. One forgets his actions in the Vendée. Or that he criticized the queen's father for not being willing to fight for his throne. In fact, the king was one of the ones who wished to await the arrival of the army to deal with the rising that brought your late master to power in 1830; he was overruled [8]. So when he was given the chance to return, as much as he would have preferred not to, he did not make the same mistake a second time. If only to prove Talleyrand wrong that Bourbons learn nothing. -now, to return to the matter of slavery. The republic abolished it, even before they had decided on their constitution or who should be their leader, they re-asserted the law of 16 pluviose an II [9]. When the charte was drafted, the king insisted that it be inclu-
Guizot: *interrupts as someone stands up below* what madwoman has wandered in from the street down there?
Saint-Leu: *chuckling* one of the three Les Tricoteuses [10] in the Chambre. That is Madame Roland- no relation of the guillotined lady of the same name.
Guizot: is that also in the charte? That women can vote?
Saint-Leu: it's not. But there also is no law that explicitly prevents them from standing for public office. And both the king and the duc de Bordeaux decided that it would be...ill-advised to refuse to honour the will of the people. It should say something when a woman- much less three- obtains more votes than her male contenders, but all the voters are men.
Guizot: I'm trying to determine if his Majesty is a mad man or a-
Saint-Leu: you have two daughters, don't you, Monsieur Guizot [11]?
Guizot: yes.
Saint-Leu: then wouldn't- if one of them were to display any aptitude for politics [12]- you wish for them to be able to follow in your footsteps if they so chose? Or would you prefer for her to become a spinster governess?
Guizot: *looks rather offended by the idea*
Saint-Leu: it would not be my first preference of career for my daughter or a granddaughter, but I also wouldn't want them to be a nun. And while even Madame Sand and the Comtesse d'Agoult would share both your sentiments and mine, as my brother says, "march at the head of the ideas of your century, and these ideas follow you and support you. March behind them and they drag you after them. March against them and they overthrow you. [13]"

*few days later* *Place de la Bastille* *Hector Berlioz is conducting the military band* *there is a cheering crowd gathered all around as the soldiers march into the square escorting the king on horseback*
*cut to the Minister de Travaux Publiques, Jacques Ignace Hittorff [14] making a short speech* *and then, once the applause dies down, we see the king sitting in the "royal box" with the duchesse de Berri at his side, give the signal*
Guizot: the queen is ill?
Alphonse de Lamartine [14]: *quietly* his Majesty believed that obliging her to attend this ceremony- on the site of the Bastille, at a memorial to the dead of both the July and April Revolutions- would be too cruel.
*the side panels of a wooden box at the centre of the place are lowered* *to reveal...a gleaming gilt-bronze elephant*
Guizot: that is what all the fuss is about?
Lamartine: no fuss, I assure you, Guizot.
Guizot: my dear Lamartine, since I have returned, I have seen a Bourbon pretending to be a Bonaparte. First in the chambres, then in that ridiculous palais that he is building at Chaillot, now with this elephant?
*a cheer goes up as the fountain begins to spout from the elephant's trunk*
Lamartine: is it a Bourbon pretending to be a Bonaparte? Or Bonaparte who wished to be a Bourbon? The design of an elephant fountain was originally considered for the Place de la Concorde when it was laid out under Louis XV already.
*we hear snippets of Louis XIX announcing to the crowd that he planned to open this fountain in commemoration of the fall of the Bastille on its fiftieth anniversary [14 July 1849]*
Guizot: *drowning out why Louis XIX didn't* so he tears down the column to the revolution-
Lamartine: not at all. The king decided to...rearrange things. When the April Revolution took place, in addition to burning the throne, Notre Dame, the court carriages and so on, the revolutionaries also toppled the Austerlitz Column. If we had left them long enough, no doubt they would've exploded the Pont d'Iena for what it represents. But that angered the Bonapartists...sacred cows and all that. There was a great bickering on the part of the architects about it, whether to restore the column or not. The duc de Bordeaux proposed the Elephant as a compromise.
Guizot: a compromise?
Lamartine: it was one of the emperor's plans, so supporting it would soothe the ruffled Bonapartist feathers about wanton destruction. To the royalists the choice of place removed a memorial to the revolution- they wished to have Monsieur Hittolff build the new opera house here-. To the Parisians, *points to fountain* it is representative of not only the king providing them with water, but also the duc de Seville and comte de Triel's championing of overhauling of the city's sewer system. The only objectors were the Orléanists such as yourself.
Guizot: so he melted down the July Column?
Lamartine: that was the king's mediation. Since the Austerlitz column left an empty base, and the July Column would have to be taken down to build the elephant...his Majesty decided that a solution to the problem- and a way of appeasing both the republicans and the Orléanists- would be to move the July Column to the Place Louis le Grand [15] rather than destroying it.
Guizot: *irritably as he watches the king descend from the box to make his way to his horse* *he is "working the crowd" returning salutes and accepting kisses to his hand* I take it back, the king isn't trying to be Bonaparte, he is doing exactly what Bonaparte did. He is rewriting history to suit his own...propaganda
Lamartine: not exactly what Bonaparte did. If it were, you, my dear Guizot, would still be in exile teaching students at Oxford how your king's rewritten history. *watches as Louis XIX mounts his horse unaided* perhaps it is for the best that the comte de Triel, Professor Filon [16] and Monsieur Dumas were given charge of the duc d'Orléans and his brother's education rather than yourself. Who knows how one such as yourself might be able to...rewrite history. *cold smile*

*fade to black*

[1] Rochejacquelein planned to stand for election in 1848, with the hope of facilitating a monarchist restoration
[2] thanks to @DrakeRlugia for pointing me in the direction of this politician
[3] Louis, Duc de Saint-Leu is the elder son of Hortense de Beauharnais and Louis Bonaparte. He has three children, a daughter, Julie (b.1827), and two sons, Louis "Lulu" (b.1830) and Henri "Enzio" (b.1835)
[4] OTL Napoléon III ("my brother", TTL comte de Triel) was a client of Hippolyte Triât, who established one of the first gyms (in the modern sense) in Paris in 1846. How did Montpensier get into it? Figure as the "bachelor uncle" with no kids of his own, he's a species of "guardian" for his nephews as much as Napoléon III is their "tutor"/governor. So he likely went to check it out to see what it's all about. He and Seville both being members could be a hilarious take on their OTL rivalry and TTL they're those two guys at the gym who are constantly competing with one another.
[5] they actually tried this in the Second Republic OTL
[6] not sure what the 1815 charte said about this, but there was debate at the drafting of the Second Republic constitution of this power devolving to the assemblée due to fears of the executive branch of government being too powerful
[7] Mathilde Bonaparte
[8] OTL
[9] Law of 4 February 1794 which reads: The National Convention declares slavery abolished throughout all the colonies: consequently, it decrees that all men, without distinction of color, domiciliated in the colonies, are French citizens, and entitled to the enjoyment of all the rights secured by the Constitution. Referred to the Committee of Public Safety for it to report immediately on the measures to be taken for the execution of the decree
[10] Les tricoteuses (the knitters) were the women who sat alongside the guillotine with their knitting during the Revolution. Of the trio listed, both Jeanne Deroin and Désirée Gay were originally seamstresses by trade, hence the nickname. The third is Pauline Roland
[11] OTL, Guizot had three sons and two daughters. The eldest son died a few days after his birth in 1813. His second son, François Junior died of pleurisy in 1837. The third boy, Guillaume, was born in 1833, and while he lived until 1892, his health was always fragile. TTL, Guillaume and his brother both die in 1837. I can't find out exactly what Guizot's stance on women's suffrage was, although given the fact that he was against universal suffrage, that might be an indicator.
[12] Guizot's elder daughter, Henriette (b.1829) did display her father's aptitude for both history, economics and languages and often acted as his hostess at the ministry OTL.
[13] Napoléon III really did say this. Pity he didn't take his own advice
[14] While most famously remembered as the architect responsible for the redesign of the Place de la Concorde in 1833, Hittorff actually has a pretty distinguished pedigree as an architect. He was one of Percier and Fontaine's chief draughtsmen. Then he was basically whatever the reincarnation of the Directeur des Menu-Plaisirs was from 1819-1830. He worked on the façades on the Champs-Elysées, the Rue de Rivoli and the Place de l'Étoile and the design of the Bois de Boulogne and the Garé du Nord. He finally fell out of favour with Napoléon III with his design for the Exposition Universelle (Napoléon le Petit considered Hittorff's plan for the grand palais "poor" and handed it off to another architect. Given that that other architect's design was criticized as resembling "an ox trampling through a rose garden", I'm not sure that was a credit to Nappy's artistic taste)
[14] while Lamartine was a Bonapartist, he actually started his "career" as a species of valet/page to Charles X
[15] OTL Place Vendôme
[16] Charles Auguste Filon, father of Augustin Filon- tutor to Napoléon III's son- and a respected monarchist, historian and professor in his own right. With one of his magnum opuses being a critical Histoire comparée de la France et de l'Angleterre (1832). Augustin and his older brother would actually be roughly "of an age" with both the duc d'Orléans (OTL comte de Paris) and Napoléon III's TTL children.
Amazing work! Love seeing the intrigues!
 
I'm very happy to see Changarnier make a little cameo!
Thank you for the recommendation, realized when looking for a plausible "president of the chamber of deputies" that most of the candidates around either received peerage and would be unable to hold the office or were diehard Orléanists or were Légitimists but not involved in politics.
Great update Kellan.… I loved it…
Thank you very much. Now...I am sorely tempted to have the "Statue of Liberty" originally made for the Place de la Concorde, and banished under the Consulate, make a reappearance to be set up outside the Palais Bourbon.

Thank you for phrasing this perfectly - and allow me to steal it in honor to use it to praise you! Fantastic, as always! Vive Louis XIX!
I'll take that as a compliment. I feel like, at this point, where everyone in France is going pro-war or anti-war, Légitimist, Orléanists or Bonapartist, Louis XIX seizes on this "compromise" /reconciliation of all three strands to remind the average Frenchman what the king is doing for them (water, sanitation, public service) as well as what can be done under peaceable conditions. I could half imagine that Guizot-so used to "Bourbon bad bad bad"- is shocked/horrified to see that not only is Louis adopting the Napoléonic imagery (the elephant, execution of the republicans, the by the will of the people illusion) as he is by the unNapoléonic behaviors (working the crowd, women in the deputies etc)
 
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Thank you very much. Now...I am sorely tempted to have the "Statue of Liberty" originally made for the Place de la Concorde, and banished under the Consulate, make a reappearance to be set up outside the Palais Bourbon.
so apparently it seems to have been presumed destroyed circa 1800

franais-franois-frdric-lemot-statue-de-la-libert-place-de-la-concorde-aquarelle-et-plume-314-x-476-cm-en-provenance-de-la-collection-hippolyte-destailleur-between-1795-and-1799-unattributed-802-lemot-pl-concorde-MP31GW.jpg

^the statue^ And on her way to the scaffold, Madame Roland addressed the statue with the words "Ô Liberté, comme on t'a jouée !" (O Liberty, how you have been fooled), often more poetically translated as "O Liberty, what crimes are committed in thy name!"

I could definitely see a replica of the statue being set up at the bottom of the main entrance's steps with those words inscribed on the pedestal as a sort of veiled criticism of the tyranny of the Revolution. Bonus points if the statue has the face of Madame Royal (the OTL statue of liberty has the face of Auguste Bartholdi's mom, so it's hardly ASB)
 
Berliner Luft
Soundtrack: Meyerbeer - Le Prophète - Gémissant sous le joug et sous la tyrannie


*Berlin* *The Moabit Ironworks* *we see Präsident Murat touring the ironworks, accompanied by his pregnant niece, Vicomtesse de Rochechouart [1], and the ironworks' owner, August Borsig*
*cut to Präsident Murat opening the Hamburger Bahnhof [2]* *he gives a short speech in "French-sounding German" praising the workers diligence and thanking them for having it finished so quickly* *the crowd roars its approval* *we see hats waved in the air* *then we seem him appearing at the window of one of the carriages as one of the new locomotives chugs a short distance along the track*
*cut to him leaving the Bahnhof and crossing the street to the Charité Hospital* *we see him visiting the patients in the wards* *talking to them briefly before moving on* *we next see him speaking with Rudolf Virchow [3]*
*cut to him being shown into one of the wards, where the vicomtesse is lying in one of the beds* *in her arms is what appears to be a bundle of cloth*
*we see Achille sitting down on the bed next to her*
Achille: *gruffly* boy or girl?
Caroline: boy, Oncle
Achille: *nods absently*

*cut to Schloss Monbijou [4]* *we see Achille receiving the new American minister to Prussia, Andrew Jackson Donelson [5] and his wife, Elizabeth Martin Randolph*
*cut to them at dinner*
Achille: *in fluent, if accented, English* your Excellency has no doubt heard of what the British have done in Brasil?
Donelson: bad show, sir, extraordinarily bad show. Even the government back in Washington says so.
Achille: and how does the United States plan to react to this outrage?
Donelson: we have no quarrel with Great Britain. And President Benton [6] has no wish to involve himself so shortly after the bloody quadmire that we were involved in with Mexico.
Achille: it was a poor move by President Clay. But then...the man always was a nitwit [7]
Donelson: and yourself, your Excellency?
Achille: even a nitwit like Clay could see that Britain was in the wrong here. If they continue in such a fashion, Brasil, Livorno, I'm told that there is some unfortunate situation in Greece that they are also trying to press [8].
Donelson: from what I have heard, sir, the instance in Greece is very similar to the situation in Livorno. The British ambassador's house was violated, and he's claiming damages.
Achille: you can understand why I do not wish to take sides against Britain, Mr. Donelson. After all, lest they hold Berlin to ransom for the damages to their ambassador's property in like fashion.
Donelson: what do you know of their intrigues in the Levant, sir?
Achille: bad business. My father- as you know- *looks at Gros' painting of Murat facing off against Mustafa Pasha at the Battle of Aboukir* was wounded in the jaw fighting them for *spits* Bonaparte [9]
Donelson: relations with your cousin have not improved, sir?
Achille: should they have? He is his father's son. I have agreed to his terms and conditions as much as I am able to while preserving Prussian independence, and the only missives I have received from him are to certify if my niece is safe and well, and a note that I "shouldn't have done that" to me sending a wreath for the king of the Belgians' funeral. He neglects to think how it would've looked for me if I hadn't sent it. All Europe would've thought that I sent the assassin to murder the man.
Donelson: of course.
Achille: now, to return to your question about the British interfering in the Levant...I say it bodes them as ill as what it does in Brasil. They will find themselves no friends from involving themselves there. The sultan already distrusts them, he thinks they are too close with Egypt. Although the Khedive is known to prefer the French to the British. Perhaps that is why they are tinkering around with Mount Lebanon [10]. To be sure, I do not forbid them to go meddle wheresoever they choose, so long as they leave me and my Prussians alone.

*cut to the Villa Bonaparte, Porta San Giorgio* *we see Frankie, Amalie and the children on the beach* *the kids are frolicking in the shallows* *we see Frankie taking a snooze in a camp chair* *Amalie is sitting in the chair alongside him reading*
*cut to Amalie standing alongside Frankie's "stepson", Robert [11] waving out at the water* *next we see Frankie stroking to shore* *then him staggering out of the water*
Amalie: *wraps a towel around him*
Frankie: *looks at her*
Amalie: so you don't freeze to death. The wind's coming up. It's why I already sent the children up.
Frankie: *looks at Robert* except this one, eh? *grins*
Robert: this came for you as we got to the house, sir. *holds out envelope* I thought it better if I brought it down than Marmont.
Frankie: *takes envelope* *we see its addressed to S.M. l'Empereur des Français* *he makes to throw it in the water* *reconsiders* *opens it* *mouth turns down*
Amalie: what is it, Frank?
Frankie: it's from Achille.
Amalie: in Berlin?
Frankie: it seems he feels the need to inform me that Caroline has given birth to a son.
Amalie: his?
Frankie: *looks at her*
Amalie: *shrugs* I've heard the rumours that he might be the father.
Frankie: he's not. The dates don't correspond. She was apparently already pregnant when she arrived in Berlin. Either way, Achille feels the diplomatic niceties should be observed and that I care that "Arthur Guillaume Casimir Joachim André de Rochechouart" has arrived in the world. And that the mother and child are both healthy.
Amalie: that's good news at least.
Frankie: some. Although in all likelihood, the vicomte will be wanting custody of his son. *continues reading* my cousin is seemingly at great pains to assure me that he will not be siding with the British in this spat-although why he thinks I should've ever thought that is unclear. - and that he hopes I will not object to that the Berlin Republic plans to sign a commercial treaty with the United States. -again, why I should care is unclear. Aside from a mention that Britain wishes to cause trouble in the Holy Land, there's nothing in the letter I couldn't have found out opening a newspaper.

*cut to Rome* *Porta del Popolo* *a carriage, escorted by sipahis [12] on horseback, pauses*
A voice from inside the carriage: arms at rest, men... We are not entering Rome as a conquering army nor has the city surrendered to us. We arrive as guests, not as a Gallic horror as we have too often in the past.
*we see the sipahis shifting their weapons uncomfortably*
*the carriage drives on*

*cut to the Palazzo Farnese* *the carriage sways into the piazza*
*cut to the interior of the Palazzo* *we see Cardinal Sisto Riario Sforza [13] and several other members of the papal government assembled in the Sala Grande*
Riario Sforza: *gives a deep bow* your Royal Highness, on behalf of his Holiness, I bid you welcome to Rome. On behalf of his Majesty, the king of the Two Sicilies, I bid you welcome to his home.
Henri: *looks at Riario Sforza* cousin [14], may I present her Royal and Imperial Highness, the Duchesse de Bordeaux, the Grand Duchess Élisabeth Mikhailovna.
Riario Sforza: *bows* your Royal Highness... Her Majesty the Queen hopes that you will find the residence to your liking and that you will enjoy your stay in Rome.
Élisabeth: *looking around in awe, but not quite goggle-eyed astonishment* it is very much like the Hermitage [15], I am sure I will feel... Most at home here. You may thank her Majesty for me. Will she and the king be joining us, your Eminence?
Riario Sforza: the queen has... once more found herself in that state that prevents her from traveling.
Henri: *quietly* I'm afraid that... Having borne witness to the tragic end of the duc d'Orléans' daughter [16], my sister does not travel when she is with child. And having lost his first wife to the birthing bed as well, my brother [in law] does not force her. They mean no offense by it, but... There are certain ghosts which one does not wish to reawaken.

*fade to black*



[1] née Caroline Laetitia Murat. Married to the Vicomte de Rochechouart since the Chapter Kabale und Liebe, in Chapter Mecklenburg, Metternich and Murat, Queen Victoria notes that she fled from her husband, Arthur de Rochechouart, to her uncle in Berlin
[2] the Hamburg Bahnhof opened in 1849 or 1850- depending on the source consulted
[3] Virchow was expelled from his chair at the Charité due to his participation in the OTL 1848 Revolution. It's not unthinkable that Murat's regime would have an interest in keeping "the pope of medicine" in place
[4] Schloss Monbijou was the residence of Luise of Prussia (daughter of Prince Carl of Prussia and Marie of Weimar) at this point OTL. But since she's crown princess of Sweden TTL, I doubt she has any use for the residence
[5] nephew of the late President Andrew Jackson, and US minister to Prussia until 1849 OTL.
[6] Thomas Hart Benton, taking @Galba Otho Vitelius ' suggestion from another thread that, if Clay had been president, Benton would likely remain the "right hand man", senior politician and a potential shoe-in for the Democrats. Not sure how likely this would be, but Calhoun, Cass and Frelinghuysen (Clay's running mate in 1844 OTL) might all be either "too radical" or too tainted by the previous regime. Benton himself felt Calhoun put personal interests and opinion ahead of the interests of the country. While Benton was expansionist à la Polk, he was opposed to expansion for expansion's sake
[7] OTL Murat didn't like Clay much OTL either. Not sure why this was, if it was simply personal or political. I'm going with personal
[8] the OTL Parkerika/Don Pacifico affair
[9] OTL. Murat cut off two of Mustapha's fingers
Antoine-Jean_Gros_-_Bataille_d%27Aboukir%2C_25_juillet_1799_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg

[10] believe it or not, Britain was pottering around here OTL as well. It wasn't outright war, more selling guns to the locals and letting them kill one another.
[11] Fanny Eisler's son by the prince of Salerno
[12] the unit was established in 1831
[13] as nephew of the papal camerlengo, Tommaso Riario Sforza, and archbishop of Naples (a position Ferdinando II recommended him for OTL) Cardinal Sisto is well placed to serve as the representative of both the church and the king of Sicily.
[14] why cousin? Sisto's paternal grandmother is the youngest daughter of Prince Xaver of Saxony (brother to Henri's great-grandmother, Maria Josepha)
[15] the Hermitage Palace in St. Petersburg contains the "Raphael Loggias" which were inspired both by the Raphael Stanze in the Vatican Palace and other parts replicated the Palazzo Farnese
[16] Chapter O Mio Babbino Caro
 
@Kellan Sullivan Amazing work as always.
Thank you
Funny that acuilles hates frankie, yet still desperetaly wants to attract his attention
To be fair, I think it's less attention and more acknowledgement that he even exists. It's not unlike how a child can hate a parent because they're ignored, yet at the same time be unwilling to sever ties completely because "maybe it'll change". Achille has his pride, and he's not going to come to Frankie on bended knee, but as much as he'd like to blame Frankie for leaving him to rot in a Prussian jail, if Frankie HADN'T done that, Achille could never have become präsident like he did. It comes down to the words of H. G. Wells "what you are [präsident] is the inescapable result of your tragedy [imprisonment]" if Frankie HAD ransomed his cousin instead of telling them to "keep him", Achille would likely be a lazy no-account still sueing everyone and their brother for money. Not saying he's a fantastic präsident or even that he's a good one, but after the tragically low bar that Friedrich Wilhelm IV set, even an average präsident can seem "decent".
 
Thank you

To be fair, I think it's less attention and more acknowledgement that he even exists. It's not unlike how a child can hate a parent because they're ignored, yet at the same time be unwilling to sever ties completely because "maybe it'll change". Achille has his pride, and he's not going to come to Frankie on bended knee, but as much as he'd like to blame Frankie for leaving him to rot in a Prussian jail, if Frankie HADN'T done that, Achille could never have become präsident like he did. It comes down to the words of H. G. Wells "what you are [präsident] is the inescapable result of your tragedy [imprisonment]" if Frankie HAD ransomed his cousin instead of telling them to "keep him", Achille would likely be a lazy no-account still sueing everyone and their brother for money. Not saying he's a fantastic präsident or even that he's a good one, but after the tragically low bar that Friedrich Wilhelm IV set, even an average präsident can seem "decent".
True
 
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