Flag Thread IV

A flag of a Fascist Yugoslavia:

View attachment 560879
Is there a way to split even between Serbs and Croats on a Yugoslav CoAs design, like having a marten supporter as well as a white eagle supporter on both sides of the shield.

You see, the biggest reason why Yugoslavia failed IOTL was that Serbs and Croats couldn’t get along... If they could live together, then the Slovenes, Bosnians, and Macedonians might try to fit in.
 
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Recently saw this:



And I got so irrationally upset because every stupid "thin blue line" flag just lazily slaps a "thin blue line" on the flag where there never was one. It works on the US flag A LITTLE because they HAVE stripes. Anyways, I made my own design.


"Thin Blue Circle" or "细蓝圈" = "The Police are the only thing keeping HK stable and together (also with China). The stars, representing the people and the Party, are also blue because the Police are loyal to them.


"Thin Red Circle" design, aka the Party or Chinese unity, or the Chinese people in general, are the only thing keeping HK stable and united.

These flags are not related to my personal views, and I would ask people NOT to use them for political-motivated reasons. They are simply an exercise in design.
 
Since I'm on a bit of a role today with my ASB Wisconsin story, I might as well upload some flags on here.
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Since the late 1920s, Wisconsin has been under the rule of a one-party socialist republic that promotes an ideology of Wisconsin nationalist identity, socialist nationalism and Pan-Amerindianism. Despite the numerous changes over the decades since the founding of the socialist state in 1926, the flag's basic colors of green, white and blue have largely remained the same with some exceptions. Here are the flags of Wisconsin over the years including the current party flag.

Before a socialist republic was proclaimed in 1926, Wisconsin had this flag between 1870 and 1926 used even during the first ten years of President Hoan's reign starting in 1916 which took Wisconsin to the left.
Flag of Republic of Wisconsin (1870-1926).png

It was a simple flag with a blue background with a red shield and a white star. The coat of arms was also a simple red shield with a white star as well. This was soon to be replaced with a nominally socialist looking flag in late 1926.

Flag of Wisconsin Socialist Republic (1927-1929).png

On December 13, 1926, a proposed national flag was introduced to the National Assembly, it would replace the previous regime's flag. The proposed flag had green symbolizing the rich green land of Wisconsin with blue on the bottom representing the great lakes and a white circle representing the oneness of the Wisconsin people. It was adopted from 1927 but was phased out in 1929 when other designers came forward with a different design that Hoan and the National Assembly preferred.
Flag of Wisconsin Socialist Republic (1929-1942).png

In 1929 a new national flag was unveiled which similar to the two year old flag from before would have a similar color of green and blue with the green being darker and in the white circle would have a single 5-pointed red star. An unusual choice because of Hoan's opposition to communism. However, the design was meant to symbolize the socialist unity of all political parties in Wisconsin and represented socialism not communism according to the flag designer. The new national flag would remain as the official flag of the state until 1942.
Flag of Wisconsin Socialist Republic (1942-1959).png

Once again in 1942 the national flag was altered again replacing the red star with a white star. The flag would be unaltered until the late 1950s when a military coup deposed of President Frank Zeidler and brought Alexander Kokotni into power in 1957. Soon the flag would be changed again.
People's Socialist Republic of Wisconsin flag.png

This now leads up to the current national flag of Wisconsin. Since 1959 this has been the official national flag of Wisconsin. The only two changes here was the inclusion of the orange flame in the center of the white star and the white and blue colors switched. The flame symbolizes socialist enlightenment and revolution in Wisconsin. Also in 1959 the Wisconsin Socialist Republic was renamed to the People's Socialist Republic of Wisconsin, a name that remains to this day.

As for the ruling party, the National Revolutionary Party of Wisconsin (NRPW), it has seen only a few changes since its inception. When the party was founded in 1919 the then Wisconsin Progressive Party which was a political coalition rather than a party, did not have an official flag or an emblem. In the 1920s despite being nominally anti-communist red flags were seldom used as a symbol of the Wisconsin Progressive Party but was not officially ordained by the state.

In 1943 the Wisconsin Progressive Party was renamed to the Wisconsin Labor Party and for the flag they simply used the national flag of Wisconsin until 1959.
Flag of the National Revolutionary Party of Wisconsin (1959-1995).png

In 1959 the Labor Party was renamed the National Revolutionary Party and since then it has stuck with that name. The party flag was also replaced in 1959 as well. It was simple green flag with a white circle on the slight left with an orange flame in the circle. This would be the party flag up until 1995 when it was replaced yet again with another flag.
Flag of the National Revolutionary Party of Wisconsin.png

From 1995 until 2019 this was the party flag used by members of the NRP. It was a simple green flag with a white star and the orange flame in the center with the letters NRP below.

In 2019 the government returned the party flag design back to its older previous one that was used during the Kokotni era.
 
Since I'm on a bit of a role today with my ASB Wisconsin story, I might as well upload some flags on here.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Since the late 1920s, Wisconsin has been under the rule of a one-party socialist republic that promotes an ideology of Wisconsin nationalist identity, socialist nationalism and Pan-Amerindianism. Despite the numerous changes over the decades since the founding of the socialist state in 1926, the flag's basic colors of green, white and blue have largely remained the same with some exceptions. Here are the flags of Wisconsin over the years including the current party flag.

Before a socialist republic was proclaimed in 1926, Wisconsin had this flag between 1870 and 1926 used even during the first ten years of President Hoan's reign starting in 1916 which took Wisconsin to the left.
View attachment 561780
It was a simple flag with a blue background with a red shield and a white star. The coat of arms was also a simple red shield with a white star as well. This was soon to be replaced with a nominally socialist looking flag in late 1926.

View attachment 561781
On December 13, 1926, a proposed national flag was introduced to the National Assembly, it would replace the previous regime's flag. The proposed flag had green symbolizing the rich green land of Wisconsin with blue on the bottom representing the great lakes and a white circle representing the oneness of the Wisconsin people. It was adopted from 1927 but was phased out in 1929 when other designers came forward with a different design that Hoan and the National Assembly preferred.
View attachment 561782
In 1929 a new national flag was unveiled which similar to the two year old flag from before would have a similar color of green and blue with the green being darker and in the white circle would have a single 5-pointed red star. An unusual choice because of Hoan's opposition to communism. However, the design was meant to symbolize the socialist unity of all political parties in Wisconsin and represented socialism not communism according to the flag designer. The new national flag would remain as the official flag of the state until 1942.
View attachment 561783
Once again in 1942 the national flag was altered again replacing the red star with a white star. The flag would be unaltered until the late 1950s when a military coup deposed of President Frank Zeidler and brought Alexander Kokotni into power in 1957. Soon the flag would be changed again.
View attachment 561784
This now leads up to the current national flag of Wisconsin. Since 1959 this has been the official national flag of Wisconsin. The only two changes here was the inclusion of the orange flame in the center of the white star and the white and blue colors switched. The flame symbolizes socialist enlightenment and revolution in Wisconsin. Also in 1959 the Wisconsin Socialist Republic was renamed to the People's Socialist Republic of Wisconsin, a name that remains to this day.

As for the ruling party, the National Revolutionary Party of Wisconsin (NRPW), it has seen only a few changes since its inception. When the party was founded in 1919 the then Wisconsin Progressive Party which was a political coalition rather than a party, did not have an official flag or an emblem. In the 1920s despite being nominally anti-communist red flags were seldom used as a symbol of the Wisconsin Progressive Party but was not officially ordained by the state.

In 1943 the Wisconsin Progressive Party was renamed to the Wisconsin Labor Party and for the flag they simply used the national flag of Wisconsin until 1959.
View attachment 561786
In 1959 the Labor Party was renamed the National Revolutionary Party and since then it has stuck with that name. The party flag was also replaced in 1959 as well. It was simple green flag with a white circle on the slight left with an orange flame in the circle. This would be the party flag up until 1995 when it was replaced yet again with another flag.
View attachment 561787
From 1995 until 2019 this was the party flag used by members of the NRP. It was a simple green flag with a white star and the orange flame in the center with the letters NRP below.

In 2019 the government returned the party flag design back to its older previous one that was used during the Kokotni era.
Fire! The superior element!
 
Since I'm on a bit of a role today with my ASB Wisconsin story, I might as well upload some flags on here.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Since the late 1920s, Wisconsin has been under the rule of a one-party socialist republic that promotes an ideology of Wisconsin nationalist identity, socialist nationalism and Pan-Amerindianism. Despite the numerous changes over the decades since the founding of the socialist state in 1926, the flag's basic colors of green, white and blue have largely remained the same with some exceptions. Here are the flags of Wisconsin over the years including the current party flag.

Before a socialist republic was proclaimed in 1926, Wisconsin had this flag between 1870 and 1926 used even during the first ten years of President Hoan's reign starting in 1916 which took Wisconsin to the left.
View attachment 561780
It was a simple flag with a blue background with a red shield and a white star. The coat of arms was also a simple red shield with a white star as well. This was soon to be replaced with a nominally socialist looking flag in late 1926.

View attachment 561781
On December 13, 1926, a proposed national flag was introduced to the National Assembly, it would replace the previous regime's flag. The proposed flag had green symbolizing the rich green land of Wisconsin with blue on the bottom representing the great lakes and a white circle representing the oneness of the Wisconsin people. It was adopted from 1927 but was phased out in 1929 when other designers came forward with a different design that Hoan and the National Assembly preferred.
View attachment 561782
In 1929 a new national flag was unveiled which similar to the two year old flag from before would have a similar color of green and blue with the green being darker and in the white circle would have a single 5-pointed red star. An unusual choice because of Hoan's opposition to communism. However, the design was meant to symbolize the socialist unity of all political parties in Wisconsin and represented socialism not communism according to the flag designer. The new national flag would remain as the official flag of the state until 1942.
View attachment 561783
Once again in 1942 the national flag was altered again replacing the red star with a white star. The flag would be unaltered until the late 1950s when a military coup deposed of President Frank Zeidler and brought Alexander Kokotni into power in 1957. Soon the flag would be changed again.
View attachment 561784
This now leads up to the current national flag of Wisconsin. Since 1959 this has been the official national flag of Wisconsin. The only two changes here was the inclusion of the orange flame in the center of the white star and the white and blue colors switched. The flame symbolizes socialist enlightenment and revolution in Wisconsin. Also in 1959 the Wisconsin Socialist Republic was renamed to the People's Socialist Republic of Wisconsin, a name that remains to this day.

As for the ruling party, the National Revolutionary Party of Wisconsin (NRPW), it has seen only a few changes since its inception. When the party was founded in 1919 the then Wisconsin Progressive Party which was a political coalition rather than a party, did not have an official flag or an emblem. In the 1920s despite being nominally anti-communist red flags were seldom used as a symbol of the Wisconsin Progressive Party but was not officially ordained by the state.

In 1943 the Wisconsin Progressive Party was renamed to the Wisconsin Labor Party and for the flag they simply used the national flag of Wisconsin until 1959.
View attachment 561786
In 1959 the Labor Party was renamed the National Revolutionary Party and since then it has stuck with that name. The party flag was also replaced in 1959 as well. It was simple green flag with a white circle on the slight left with an orange flame in the circle. This would be the party flag up until 1995 when it was replaced yet again with another flag.
View attachment 561787
From 1995 until 2019 this was the party flag used by members of the NRP. It was a simple green flag with a white star and the orange flame in the center with the letters NRP below.

In 2019 the government returned the party flag design back to its older previous one that was used during the Kokotni era.
Seems well thought out and contextual based.
Kudos!
 
Alternate US state flags (by Petike): Chapter 1

A few years ago, I made the resolution that I would create my own reworked versions of US state flags.

I even used this as a backstory for two state flags I already designed, when I entered them into the Weekly Flag Challenge back then.

Since then, my efforts had unfortunately stalled. However, now I've decided to revisit this older project of mine. This summer, and possibly until the end of this year, I will be taking part in a self-imposed challenge at redesigning various US state flags. Particularly those that have good elements, but are too cluttered and busy, or use questionable colour and charge choices, etc. Furthermore, like with my initial flags made for the project, the premise is that the US is trying to replace complicated-seals-on-a-bedsheet state flags with "bedsheet" state flags that have a proper, heraldic coat of arms. Minimalism, taking the rule of tincture into account, that sort of thing.

In each chapter of this ongoing project of mine, you'll find links to the OTL US state flags I'm reworking, as well as links to untextured, base versions of the flags I'll be gradually presenting.

----

General ATL backstory to this vexilological project

A timeline where the North American Vexilological Association saw the creation of a spinoff organisation, the North American Heraldry Association. During the ATL 1980s, the NAVA and NAHA gained a lot of public attention and lobbying power. Combined with a favourable political climate at the time, many US states agreed to create newer, simpler versions of their flags. Given the goal of greater simplicity, but also apprehension towards losing some of the traditional vexilological symbols, NAVA consultants proposed the idea of switching to European-style heraldry, with flags containing coats of arms instead of circular state seals. This was adopted as a compromise for many reworked US state flags, which still kept their basic "bedsheet" approach, but replaced their overly busy seals with coats of arms. This whole effort became known as the Heraldising reform. Though initially questioned by many, it gained gradual support from the public and new US state flags were born during the 1980s and 1990s.

----



State flag of Vermont (untextured version)

The coat of arms on the post-1980s Vermont state flag keeps the central tree, mountains and sheaves of wheat symbolism from the original coat of arms, but eschews everything else and simplifies the heraldic charges significantly. Only two colours were used for the coat of arms, a stark reduction from the many different shades used in the old coat of arms. In a creative use of this deliberate minimalism, the chosen colour for the mountain that makes up the majority of the shield was chosen as green (vert), while gold (or) was selected for the flora charges and the sky, to provide effective contrast. This makes the coat of arms a "talking" type, pointing to the name of the state (Vertmont, "Green Mountain"; historically misspelled as Vermont). A minor concession to the highly heraldic approach to the coat of arms was adding the little state motto at its foot, the single element unchanged from the previous flag with the state seal.




State flag of New Hampshire (untextured version)

The coat of arms on the post-1980s New Hampshire flag keeps the ship and wreath symbolism from the original state seal, in simplified form, while eschewing all the other graphical elements. To tie the coat of arms back to a pre-independence, colonial era seal, a trout-like fish is included in the upper part of the shield, above the wreath and ship. The New Hampshire coat of arms and flag helps highlight the early colonial period of the territory and the long history of settlement. The background of the flag was changed from dark blue to dark green, in order to avoid contrast issues with the coat of arms, and to provide the flag with a more distinguishable appearance.




State flag of West Virginia (untextured version)

West Virginia's state seal is notably complex and the history of its state flag has gone back and forth in terms of symbols, though the same motives repeat throughout the 20th century. The NAHA chose a few of the most enduring and meaningful symbols. Rhododendron maximum flowers were a recurring motif on the state's flag in the past. The wreath of green sprigs from this plant, with white-and-red flowers, was kept from the previous state seal. Between the two sprigs, at the centre of the upper half of the coat of arms, is a red phrygian cap, a symbol of liberty, seen already in previous WV state seals and flags. Together with the springs, the cap stands out on a white background, its colour meant to symbolise purity of heart and peace. The lower half of the new West Virginian coat of arms is green, symbolising the green forests and mountains of the Appalachians and the state, with an argent anvil at the forefront, symbolising the mining, crafts and industries of West Virginian history.

Yes, ladies and gents, you can humm the song, if you like. ;)




State flag of Wyoming - basic variant (untextured version)



State flag of Wyoming - heraldic variant (untextured version)

With the flag of Wyoming, the NAHA and NAVA had relatively little work to do. The seal of Wyoming was removed from the buffalo silhouette, and the new coat of arms for Wyoming incorporated the tincture pattern and the buffalo charge from the basic state flag. The coat of arms then became the basis for the heraldic variant of the state flag as well.




State flag of Arizona - basic variant (untextured version)



State flag of Arizona - heraldic variant (untextured version)

Arizona's flag was one of the easier existing state flags to tweak. The colour of the central star on the flag had never been officially specificed, and though an orange/copper colour was in use for decades, a white star, for better contrast, was popular on many variant flags of Arizona. This white star, with a slightly thicker black border, ultimately won out. It also became the basis for the state's new coat of arms, replacing the old state seal, and the coat of arms then appeared on a heraldic variant of the standard version, devised in cooperation between NAVA and NAHA.

----

The story so far:
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Chapter 4
 
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A flag of a People's Democratic Republic of Austria
Not a bad flag, though a bit on the busy side.

Some of the vassals and imitator regimes of the USSR always tended to have busy emblems, didn't they ? :p

How oddly US state seal of them ! :D (Now you know why I am trying to make simplified US state flags. ;) :D)

Though I think your Austria is from a non-USSR timeline. Just my hunch.
 
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Not a bad flag, though a bit on the busy side.

Some of the vassals and imitator regimes of the USSR always tended to have busy emblems, didn't they ? :p

How oddly US state seal of them ! :D (Now you know why I am trying to make simplified US state flags. ;) :D)

Though I think your Austria is from a non-USSR timeline. Just my hunch.
Well, I imagined this flag in the TL where soviets goes through Europe to France. So, in this fact, Austria is well a USSR-aligned country.
 
A flag of a communist Luxemburg:
You might want to remove the crown from the lion's head or else give it a mural crown. Another change I would suggest would be to have the lion hold the hammer in one hand and the sickle in the other instead of having them overlaid on it.
 
You might want to remove the crown from the lion's head or else give it a mural crown. Another change I would suggest would be to have the lion hold the hammer in one hand and the sickle in the other instead of having them overlaid on it.
Yes, why not? But it's still with Photoshop or with an other software i could do this?


Otherwise, I also have an alternative flag of Algeria. In a TL where the decolonization of Algeria was surprisingly smooth, and where European settlers have the right to stay there as Algerian citizens. The bands represent Europeans in blue, the Kabyles in yellow, the Berbers in white, and the Arabs in green.

algerian flag.png
 
But it's still with Photoshop or with an other software i could do this?
Another good free program is paint.net, for bitmap images (for Windows only). For vector images, inkscape is good.

Those, and GIMP which Marc linked to, are all linked to in the Illustration Tutorials and Advice Superthread, which also has links to some good tutorials for using various programs and hints on making various types of graphics, including flags.
 
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