Fictional inventory of modern airforces

Dassault's a Go-Go Part II

Carrying from the earlier Dassault a Go Go post and continuing in the same timeline as before. This concerns the Ouragan and the Mystere series of aircraft becoming standard European combat aircraft instead of the F-84 & F-86 series.

BELGUIM

120 x Ouragan
120 x Mystere I/II
120 x Mystere IV
120 x Super Mystere

All license built by SABCA instead of 444 x F-84 in OTL

GERMANY

240 x Ouragan
240 x Mystere i/II
240 x Mystere IV
240 x Super Mystere

All license built instead of 783 x F-84 & 163 x F-86 in OTL

GREECE

72 x Ouragan
72 x Mystere I/II
72 x Mystere IV
72 x Super Mystere

All license built by FIAT instead of 382 F-84 & F-86 in OTL

ITALY

160 x Ouragan
160 x Mystere I/II
160 x Mystere IV
160 x Super Mystere

All license built by FIAT instead of 525+ F-84 & 155 x F-86 in OTL

NETHERLANDS

120 x Ouragan
120 x Mystere I/II
120 x Mystere IV
120 x Super Mystere

All license built by FOKKER instead of 377 x F-84 & 63 x F-86 in OTL

PORTUGAL

48 x Ouragan
48 x Mystere I/II
48 x Mystere IV
48 x Super Mystere

All built in France instead of 125 x F-84 & 65 x F-86 in OTL

SPAIN

60 x Ouragan
60 x Mystere I/II
60 x Mystere IV
60 x Super Mystere

All built in France instead of 270 x F-86 in OTL

TURKEY

160 x Ouragan
160 x Mystere I/II
160 x Mystere IV
160 x Super Mystere

All built in France instead of 483 x F-84 & 206 x F-100 in OTL
Four types instead of one for a small air force like that of Belgium? Madness.
 
Four types instead of one for a small air force like that of Belgium? Madness.
That's why they did the smart thing and got on the F-104G program. For a little airforce? Being able to offer 60 mission capable strike aircraft into the battle plan of 2 AFCENT should certainly indicate a commitment under the NATO manifest?
The F-104 tac-nuke capability gave WarPac eternal indigestion during the times of tension,
They had no means to counter it at the time. Their subsequent efforts (MiG 23 in it's variants) were still incapable of dealing with a 104 on a "one way" mission.
There was a large degree of "gallows humor" amongst the pilots flying/training for these sorties.
"No one gets out alive" is the common narrative...there is NO DEEPER TRUTH than the assessment provided by these guys.i
If it all goes sideways? We all (to a large degree) die...
 
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Boeing was already busy enough (on the Commercial level), Lockmart? Not so much.
Hence the reason for the C-5A
The 747 series was originally designed from the Boeing's C-X application not the other way around.

Without the C-X program they'd be no 747.
 

Pangur

Donor
The 747 series was originally designed from the Boeing's C-X application not the other way around.

Without the C-X program they'd be no 747.
Which is why I raised the query. That query has a follow on, namely a civilian airline based on the C5 i.e. swap there fates around
 
The Indian Air Force

The HAL (Hindustan Aeronautic Ltd) HF-24 'Marut' program

Originally designed by Kurt Tank and powered by two license built Bristol Orpheus the prototype first flew in 1961. Knowing the limitations at the time for this engine Kurt Tank quickly built an entirely different second prototype powered by a single Rolls Royce Avon which both the Indian and UK govt's had come to agreement to license built.

This change of engine instillation allowed the second prototype to soon travel at Mach 2 on it's next few flights and easily get to 50,000 ft with reheat and have performance comparable with the Dassault Mirage III.

An order was placed for 480 'Marut' F-1's in 1966 with deliveries starting in 1967 and continuing through to 1980.

As the manufacture of the first 'Marut's' got under way in 1966, Kurt Tank at the request of the Indian Gov't and HAL designed another version of the 'Marut' which was more orientated to the attack/strike role but keeping the same performance as the 'Marut' F-1. With a different nose profile to accommodate a radar from the UK's Jaguar which was being developed for both the French and UK air forces, the prototype for this model first flew in early 1968.

After successful series of test flights the 'Marut' FGR-1 was ordered in late 1968 and had performance comparable with the Dassault Mirage V.

An order for 480 'Marut' FGR's was made in late 1968 to be delivered from 1969 until 1983. This allows the Indian Air Force to virtually use one type of aircraft.

The 'Sea Marut'

In 1970 HAL, again with Kurt Tank's guidance was asked if it was possible to navalize the 'Marut' for carrier operations from the deck of the Indian Navy's "Majestic" class carrier as it's air group was becoming completely obsolete. The Dassault Etendard then Super Etendard aircraft was originally nominated in this role but it was felt that it was better to see a completely home built aircraft fly from the ship.

In 1971, a pre-production 'Sea Marut' with a heavier, stronger landing gear and arrestor hook made several landings and take off's from the carrier INS Vikrant throughout the year.

An order for 60 'Sea Marut's' was placed in 1972 to entirely re-equip the INS Vikrant's air group plus reserve Sqn's. These would be delivered throught the 1970's. INS Vikrant is never converted to a STOL carrier with SHAR's.

It was expected that all the Air Force aircraft would be replaced by a new design again of home grown origin sometime in the 80's based on a Dornier design called the ND-102

1200px-Northrop-Dornier_ND-102_modelle.jpg


images.jpg
 
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This was supposed to happen for the Philippine Air Force:

F/A-18 Hornet and F-16 Fighting Falcons by the late 90s. Never happened because of the 1998 Asian financial crisis. At that time, PAF used F-5s which retired in 2005. It would be in 2015 when the PAF received T/A-50 Fighting Eagles from South Korea.

JAS Grippen was considered in 2009 but has yet to push through.
 
Which is why I raised the query. That query has a follow on, namely a civilian airline based on the C5 i.e. swap there fates around
Right, I've been mulling over this for a while and can't see how a C-5 based airliner can come to fruition as Lockheed already have the L-1011 in the pipeline

Here's an idea.

Boeing wins the C-X program and as a consequence never goes on to develop the 747. Lockheed although disappointed carries on with it's L-1011 program.

Douglas & Lockheed both launch their respective aircraft.

As a consequence of there being no 747, both companies have a virtual duopoly of this class of aircraft until the 1990's when the 777 & A330/340 are launched.

747's produced until 1994 (introduction of 777) per model.

168 747 100's plus 16 100B's. 29 SR's. 45 SP's, 393 200's, 81 300's, 282 400's

Keeping to the 60/40 sales split between the DC-10 & L-1011 as in otl you get an extra 559 DC-10's and 373 L-1011's.
 
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